Fireworks Hand Safety Hand Surgeon

5 Fireworks Tips from a Hand Surgeon

Fireworks are a fascinating and fun part of holiday celebrations throughout the country. Unfortunately, this popular tradition is also associated with injuries that are all too common among both adults and children. Each year, it is estimated that over 10,000 fireworks-related injuries occur in the United States and at least 40% of these injuries involve the arm, hand, and fingers.

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Ligament Wrist Pain Wrist Sprain

Do I Have a Torn Ligament?

A torn ligament can happen in conjunction with a sprained wrist, typically when the wrist is bent backwards forcefully or put into an awkward position. This can happen during any sport such as gymnastics, soccer, football, etc. or simply during a fall. Ligaments are bands of tough connective tissue that connect two bones or hold together a joint. The most common ligament to be injured during a wrist sprain is the scapholunate ligament, which holds together the scaphoid and lunate bones.

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Hand Therapy Musician Overuse

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Injury Prevention for Musicians

In a previous blog post we discussed some of the common injuries that can occur in musicians due to the repetitive and sustained nature of playing an instrument.  These can include pain and cramping of the neck and shoulder. Numbness, tingling, heaviness, tremors and pain can occur in the wrist and hand, and fingers can become “stuck” in a bent position.

While a musician may seek treatment when these injuries occur, we as clinicians would prefer to help musicians learn to prevent these injuries in the first place. This can help prevent loss of playing time, income, and the ability to participate in their passion. Fortunately, there are techniques that can be learned in order to keep a musicians body “in tune” – learning body awareness, healthy practice and play, and maintaining general health and wellness.

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Amputation Hand Surgery Hand Therapy Prosthetics

Recovering From a Hand, Finger or Arm Amputation

The definition of an amputation is “the action of surgically cutting off a limb,” however, an amputation can also happen by accident. Many times, an amputation of the hand, finger or arm is the result of a tragic accident, but amputations can also be planned surgeries to prevent the spread of a disease. Sometimes, fingers that were amputated in an accident can be reattached by a hand surgeon, but this isn’t always possible.

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Finger Stiff Fingers Stiffness

10 Causes of Stiff Fingers

Hand surgeon Thomas R. Boyce, MD discusses why your fingers may be stiff and how to treat them.

Stiff fingers can be very troublesome.  Your hands and fingers are vital tools with which you interact with the world.  Without normal use of your hands and fingers, activities including household tasks, work, hobbies, and sports all can become more difficult.

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Fingertip Injury Jersey Finger Tendon Injuries

How to Treat a Jersey Finger

A “jersey finger” gets its name from, you guessed it, a sports jersey! Jersey fingers are a casual name for the disruption of a tendon in the finger, often times caused by gripping someone’s jersey with a clenched hand during a game while that person runs in the opposite direction. The force can cause your fingertip to abruptly extend, resulting in your tendon being pulled and sometimes even a chipped bone. This typically happens with the ring finger, but it can technically happen with any finger.

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Hand Surgeon PA Physician Assistant

What is a PA?

Lauren B. Grossman, MD answers your questions about physician assistants, also known as PAs.

What is a PA?

A PA is a physician assistant, a health care professional who is credentialed to practice medicine with physician supervision. There are more than 123,000 PAs who practice in every medical setting in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

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Hand Pain Joint Pain Joints

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Joint Protection

Until our hands begin to become painful we rarely think about the activities they perform.  The joints of your hands are smaller than your knees or shoulders, allowing us to reach into tight spaces, pinch, and manipulate objects.  Your joints are supported by ligaments which connect bone to bone and stop the joints from moving into directions they shouldn’t go. They provide support for the joint, allowing the muscle to move the joint correctly.  Throughout our lifetime joints can be stressed during activities like carrying a grocery bag, wringing out a washcloth, or twisting off a bottle cap.  These activities can stretch ligaments and wear out cartilage in your joints resulting in inflammation and pain.  There are simple strategies you can use to protect your joints which will reduce pain during daily tasks.

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