Espanol Hand Hand Conditions

5 Common Hand Conditions (in Español) / 5 Condiciones comunes de la mano

Did you know that the American Society for Surgery of the Hand provides online information on 20 different hand and upper extremity conditions in Spanish? Here are some of our most popular conditions in Spanish:

  1. Artritis de la base del pulgar (thumb arthritis): La artritis en la base del pulgar es una predisposición genética: al igual que las canas y el afinamiento del pelo, aparece con la edad y surge más temprano en algunas familias.  A diferencia del afinamiento del cabello, las mujeres tienden a padecer artritis del pulgar antes que los hombres.
  2. Dedo en gatillo (trigger finger): La tendosinovitis estenosante, comúnmente conocida como “dedo en gatillo” o “pulgar en gatillo”, afecta los tendones y poleas de la mano que flexionan los dedos.
  3. Quistes sinoviales (ganglion cysts): Los quistes sinoviales (o “gangliones”) son bultos muy comunes en la mano y la muñeca que aparecen junto a articulaciones o tendones.  Los lugares más comunes son la parte de arriba de la muñeca, el lado de la palma de la muñeca, la base de los dedos del lado de la palma y la parte superior de la articulación que está más cerca de la punta de los dedos.
  4. Síndrome del túnel carpiano (carpal tunnel syndrome): El síndrome del túnel carpiano (STC) es una afección que surge debido al aumento de la presión sobre el nervio medo en la muñeca. En efecto, es un nervio pellizcado en la muñeca.
  5. Epicondilitis lateral (tennis elbow): La epicondilitis lateral, en general conocida como codo de tenista, es una afección dolorosa de los tendones que se unen al hueso en la parte externa (lateral) del codo.

For additional topics in Spanish, visit www.HandCare.org.

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Anatomy Forearm Muscles Wrist

Anatomy 101: Wrist Muscles and Forearm Muscles

The wrist muscles and forearm muscles do so much more than give you strength in your arm and wrist. These muscles also play a part in helping you move your hand and fingers. There are 18 different muscles!

Here’s a preview of these muscles:

  • Flexor pollicis longus: Helps you bend the tip of your thumb.
  • Flexor digitorum profundus: Helps you bend your index, middle, ring and small fingers.
  • Flexor digitorum superficialis: Helps you bend the middle joint of each finger, except for the thumb, which allows you to do things such as eating with chopsticks.
  • Flexor carpi ulnaris: Helps you move your wrist away from the thumb, which is helpful in playing darts.
  • Brachioradialis: Helps you twist your forearm so your palm is either facing up or down.
  • Flexor carpi radialis: Helps you bend the wrist and move it toward the thumb.
  • Palmaris longus: Helps you bend the wrist.
  • Extensor pollicis brevis: Helps you straighten the thumb.

To learn more about all 18 muscles, visit our wrist and forearm muscles page on www.HandCare.org.

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Hand Hand Safety Lawnmower

How To Use a Lawnmower Safely

Download a PDF of this infographic.

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Hand Hand Surgery Hand Therapy

What is a Hand Therapist?

I have been told to see a hand therapist, but am unsure what that means. Who provides “hand therapy”?

A hand therapist is an occupational therapist (OT) or physical therapist (PT) who has specific training and expertise in treating hand and arm conditions. Typically, this person has spent many additional years gaining expertise with hand and arm injuries and treatment. When an OT or PT has reached this higher level of experience, they often become a Certified Hand Therapist (CHT).

So I can see anyone that is a PT, OT or CHT to take care of my problem?

You will want to ensure that the therapist you see, whether it is an OT or a PT, is qualified to treat your condition. If they are a CHT, it means they have had extra training and passed a rigorous exam to demonstrate their skill. If they are an OT or a PT, they may still treat hand and arm conditions, but you should ask questions to ensure they have spent extra time after their formal education learning about the hand and arm. To find a hand therapist near you, click here.

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Avocado Cuts Hand Safety Knife Safety

How to Cut an Avocado Without Cutting Yourself

from The New York Times

Avocados may seem harmless, but if you’ve ever peeled and cut one, you know they can be more than a little troublesome. They’re slippery, they’re oddly shaped, and they have that annoying pit in the middle that rarely slips out as easily as you’d like.

These characteristics have earned the avocado a reputation as one of the most dangerous foods to cut. Just recently, the wife of a colleague here at The New York Times was slicing an avocado when she suffered a cut so deep she had to be taken to the emergency room.

Medical professionals and hospitals in the United States don’t track kitchen injuries by ingredient, but anecdotally, doctors say they see a number of avocado-related cooking injuries annually — enough to notice.

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Baseball Elbow Hand Sports Injury

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Treating Tommy John Injuries

Baseball season is in full swing for the pros. Unfortunately, for many youth baseball players, summer leagues are just one of the year-round seasons they play. A Tommy John injury (injury of the ulnar collateral ligament at the elbow) was unheard of in youth leagues in the mid-90s. By 2010, the adolescent rate was nearly 40 percent. As a baseball enthusiast, I find this trend disturbing. I asked Dr. Bobby Chhabra, Chair of the Orthopedic Department at the University of Virginia, his perception of this epidemic.

“Every year I see more and more adolescent elbow injuries from pitching and throwing. These injuries vary across a spectrum from little leaguer’s elbow, to muscle strains, to UCL injuries (Tommy John), and cartilage injuries. I would agree that the adolescent rate is increasing and the trend shows that this group may soon reach half of all surgeries performed to repair a Tommy John injury. 

The reasons for this are likely multi-factorial but include the increasing number of kids who play one sport and pitch year round from a young age, have poor mechanics, have fatigue leading to poor mechanics and injury, and have overuse with minimal rest.  

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CMC Boss Hand Hand Pain Lumps and Bumps

How to Know if You Have a CMC Boss

A carpometacarpal boss, also known as a CMC boss or “bossing,” is a lump that appears on the back of the hand. It is typically in line with the pointer or middle finger. The exact cause of it is unknown, although sometimes they can arise from a traumatic injury or repetitive wrist motion that can happen during things like golf.

Here are some signs that you have a CMC boss:

  • You notice a lump on the back of your hand
  • It appeared between the ages of 20 and 40
  • You feel pain when moving the wrist up or down
  • You feel a snapping sensation when moving the wrist
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Hand Rotator Cuff Shoulder Shoulder Pain

5 Potential Causes of Shoulder Pain

Shoulder pain can be caused by a wide variety of issues. This is because the shoulder is comprised of several key structures, including tendons, cartilage and bone. The shoulder itself is a ball-and-socket joint, which allows a wide range of movement.

Shoulder pain can range from pain simply with moving the shoulder to the inability to lift the arm overhead or feeling weak. Here are five potential causes of such shoulder pain:

  1. Shoulder Arthritis: This can be caused by everyday wear and tear.
  2. Frozen Shoulder: If you have frozen shoulder, the inner lining of your shoulder has become inflamed and tight, preventing you from having full motion and also causing pain.
  3. Shoulder Dislocation: A dislocation is when the ball slides out of the socket. This is most commonly caused by an athletic injury or fall.
  4.  Shoulder Fractures: A shoulder fracture is another word for a broken shoulder. It can be a break of the ball, socket or scapula.
  5. Rotator Cuff Injuries: The rotator cuff is where the four tendons that encompass the ball of the shoulder meet. Injuries to the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain.
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