Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

Video: Preparing for Surgery


Surgery can be a scary thing. Not only does it mean your body will be undergoing a procedure, but it also requires taking time off work, receiving help at home and coordinating transportation to and from surgery. Despite these obstacles, surgeon members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand will ensure that your surgical experience is a good one. Your hand surgeon wants the best outcome for you.

To achieve the best outcome, your surgeon will be well prepared prior to your surgery. Reviewing the procedure with you is just one way your doctor will prepare. Watch our short, 1-minute video above to learn more about preparing for surgery.

Visit www.HandCare.org to read about different hand surgeries and how a hand surgeon can help you.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Hand Surgery

Random Fact: Recovering from Carpal Tunnel Surgery

technology, home and lifestyle concept - close up of man working with laptop computer and sitting on sofa at home

Did you know? After carpal tunnel surgery, you can begin using a keyboard again within two weeks. Now that’s a fast recovery! Learn more about Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and how it’s treated.

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Hand Hand Safety Snowblower Safety

How to Practice Snowblower Safety

Snow being removed during winter storm using snow blower.

As the snow piles up this winter, now is the time to use snowblowers, the quickest way to clear snow from your driveway and sidewalk. However, snowblowers can be dangerous and cause serious accidents. In fact, the most common snowblower injury is amputated fingertips, which results from misusing the machine.

Snowblower accidents typically occur when the snow is heavy and wet or has accumulated about 6 inches or more. Here are important tips to practice snowblower safety this season:

To keep your machine from clogging:

  • Work at a brisk pace. The faster the blades and pace, the less likely the snow will stick.
  • If heavy, wet snow is anticipated, consider snowblowing several times during the snowfall.
  • Some people spray the blades and chute with cooking oil spray. This may help.
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Hand Hand Surgery Scars

Surgical Scar Tissue: A Less-Talked-About Side Effect

Vector medical concept Surgeons in operation theater. Room with people, scalpel and screen disease and pulse patient, assistant doctor illustration. Team doctors in the operating room with the patient

from US News & World Report

When the short-term effects of surgery – such as oozing wounds and incision pain – have long faded, an unseen complication may be lurking beneath the skin. Excess scar tissue, layers deep, can significantly reduce function and movement months after surgery. And on the skin’s surface, visible, lingering scars might be noticeable enough to really bother patients. Before you undergo surgery, here’s what to know about reducing scarring as you heal.

Bend and straighten your elbow. The folds that form in your skin, known as Langer’s lines, represent the direction and orientation of the collagen fibers, similar to the grain of wood, says Dr. Robert Klapper, director of the Joint Replacement Program in Orthopaedic Surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. During surgery, it’s not always possible for surgeons to cut parallel to the grain with their scalpels.

“If you are not able, because of heart surgery for example, to get down to the sternum, we as surgeons have to violate the Langer’s line,” Klapper says. “This can often lead to keloids and bumps and poor healing, and extra scar tissue can take place.”

Performing joint surgery, Klapper says, involves cutting into multiple layers of anatomy: the epidermis or skin surface; subcutaneous fat; fascia or connective tissue; muscles, tendons and ligaments; and the lining around the bone called the ostium. “It’s kind of like a seven-layer cake, if you will,” he says. “As a surgeon, you must respect in your repair of the surgery all layers of the seven-layer cake. All should get closed properly.”

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Hand Hand Safety Hand Therapy

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Safety Tips to Avoid Common Holiday Injuries

christmas-lights-cropped

Many of us start our holiday preparations by “making a list and checking it twice!” Suddenly, we are overwhelmed by its length. The fact that baking, decorating, shopping, wrapping and travel all come before December 25 can be dismaying. If this describes your current quandary, please continue to read about how you can have a safe and enjoyable holiday season!

The most commonly reported decorating injuries are lacerations, back strains and falls. Luggage-related injuries increased to approximately 75,500 annually, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. The American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) reports that holiday hand injuries are caused by carving a turkey, ham or roast and that tendon and nerve injuries are caused during meal cleanup (contact with a sharp knife or a broken glass).

Here are simple holiday tips for ladder safety, luggage transport and meat carving:

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Hand Hand Safety Ski and Snowboard Injury

Skiing Safety and Snowboarding Safety Tips

ski-and-snowboard-safety-v1_image

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Finger Hand Systemic Disease

8 Examples of Systemic Diseases

Rheumatoid arthritis , Gout arthritis ( Film x-ray both hands of child with multiple joint arthritis ) ( Medical , Science and Health care concept )

A systemic disease is a disease that affects other parts of the body, or even the whole body. The hands are complex. They are composed of many types of tissue including blood vessels, nerves, skin and skin-related tissues, bones, and muscles/tendons/ligaments. Because of this complexity, the hands may suffer from side effects of systemic diseases. Here are some examples that may affect the hand:

1. Arthritic Swelling: Swelling of the middle joint of a finger is called a Bouchard’s node, and swelling at the small finger joints are called Heberden’s nodes.

2. Dactylitis: Dactylitis can sometimes be associated with psoriatic arthritis.  It can cause swelling and stiffness in the fingers. There also may be pain.  This swelling may be improved with medicines for the problem causing it.

3. Mucous Cyst: With a mucous cyst, if the skin becomes thin, the cyst may break resulting in drainage of a clear sticky fluid.  This may allow bacteria to reach the nearby joint, causing a joint or bone infection.

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Arthritis Hand Thumb Thumb Arthritis

How to Treat Thumb Arthritis

Closeup on young housewife opening jar of pickled cucumbers

Thumb arthritis can cause you to feel pain and weakness when you try to pinch things (with your thumb and index finger) and also when you try to grasp objects. It can be painful opening jars, turning doorknobs or keys, and sometimes writing. This condition is genetic. Just like gray hair, it comes on with age; however, women tend to have thumb arthritis more often than men. With some families, it can show up at a younger age.

Like other types of arthritis, this condition is due to the thinning of cartilage, which covers our joints. Without this cartilage, the joints cannot allow the bones to move as smoothly as they normally would, which causes pain.

Because thumb arthritis is typically part of the aging process, treatment can sometimes be unnecessary. To ease the pain, the follow treatments are sometimes used:

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