Monthly Archives: Oct 2015

Ganglion Cysts Hand Wrist

Ask a Doctor: Ganglion Cysts

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. Khurram Pervaiz answers your questions about ganglion cysts.

My doctor told me I have a “ganglion cyst.” What is that?

A ganglion “cyst” is a benign (not cancer) mass that can occur in the hand or wrist. The cyst is composed of a sac filled with fluid.

What causes a ganglion cyst?

No one knows exactly why this happens, but a defect in the joint capsule causes fluid to leak out into the soft tissues and cause the cyst.

What are some of the symptoms of a ganglion cyst?

Ganglion cysts can happen in different parts of the hand and wrist. They most commonly appear on the “back” of the wrist. They may also affect the palm side of the wrist, hand or fingers. They sometimes are attached to a finger tendon. A ganglion cyst can change in size. Some hurt, and others do not.

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Elbow Hand Joints Shoulder Wrist

How to protect your wrists, elbows and shoulders during yoga

Group of three young women practicing the side plank pose during yoga class in a gym

from Huffpost Healthy Living

Some of the most common injuries in yoga are muscle or joint problems, though most problems are mild. Yoga can even be a safe and helpful form of exercise for people with joint issues like rheumatoid arthritis, as long as you know how to modify postures with the help of your yoga teacher.

Here are seven tips to help keep your joints healthy and safe in yoga:

1. Protect your wrists: Spread your hands wide and evenly when your hands bear weight, such as in Downward Facing Dog Pose.

Beginners in yoga often tent their hands in Downward Facing Dog Pose, but this actually makes it more difficult on your hands and wrists. Make sure that your hands are spread wide and ground all corners of your palm on your mat. Your hands should be pressed down firmly enough that someone would not be able to pluck your fingers off the mat.

Dr. David Wei of Orthopaedic & Neurosurgery Specialists in Greenwich, CT, an orthopedic hand surgeon who specializes in injuries of the hand, wrist, and elbow, explains:

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Finger Hand Hand Safety Hand Therapy

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Pumpkin Carving Tools

pile of small cute pumpkins at pumpkin patch

Are pumpkin-carving tools really worth buying? 

Yes, there has been real research on this topic. Dr. Alexander Marcus and his research group in Syracuse, N.Y. tested the performance of two different pumpkin carving tools against a serrated and a plain kitchen knife*. They tested the pressure it takes to cut or puncture a pumpkin with each of the knives and the pumpkin-carving tools. They then used the same pressure against the fingers of cadavers. The pumpkin-carving tools proved to be far superior and safer. The plain kitchen knife caused more injuries than the serrated kitchen knife. Both kitchen knives cut through both the tendons of the finger and, in some cases, a nerve as well. Kitchen knives require more force to puncture a pumpkin, meaning more opportunity for injury.

You can feel confident that investing in pumpkin-carving gadgets is a good idea. If you are interested in seeing the article along with pictures of the test, please be advised that there is a photo of a cadaver hand: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743504000374.

Here are some safe and creative ways to decorate your pumpkin this year:

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Anatomy Hand Thumb

The Value of the Thumb

from Medical Daily

Whether we’re doing fingerprints or we’re battling in a “thumb war,” we often take one of, if not the most valuable digit for granted. The thumb allows us to grasp objects, hitch a ride, and text message. But how powerful and versatile is our thumb?

 

In the BBC Series “Dissected,” hand surgeon Donald Sammut demonstrates to presenter Dr. George McGavin what gives the thumb its unique abilities by dissecting the human hand. “The general arrangement of the human hand has two hills and a valley in the middle, and these two hills consist of muscle, and they serve the little finger and the thumb,” Sammut says in the video.

Sammut strips away the tissues that protect the vital structures of the palm to look at the thumb. It’s surrounded by fat, which covers all of the important structures that pass through, such as major arteries, nerves, and flexor tendons — tissues that help control movement in your hand. The thumb has no fewer than nine muscles that are solely dedicated to controlling it, contributing to the precision of this intricate muscle system.


Learn more about anatomy of the hand at www.HandCare.org.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

5 Pumpkin Carving Safety Tips

Pumpkin Carving Tips FINAL

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Hand Thumb Thumb Arthritis Thumb Pain

Thumb Arthritis: Symptoms, Treatment and Recovery

 

Thumb arthritis, sometimes known as “basal joint arthritis” or “arthritis base of the thumb,” is a condition that is genetic and tends to come with age. Patients with thumb arthritis find it difficult to perform daily tasks such as opening a jar or turning a doorknob. The pain and swelling is found at the base of the thumb.

Watch this two-minute video to see how a quick surgery can relieve thumb arthritis symptoms if splints and injections do not work for you.

Learn more about Thumb Arthritis and watch more short videos at www.HandCare.org.

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Anatomy Elbow Hand

Anatomy 101: Elbow Tendons

Tendons-Elbow-Brachioradialis

 

The elbow is where your forearm and upper arm join together. Elbow tendons help connect muscles and bones, allowing your arm to bend and straighten. Here are some specifics:

  • Biceps brachii tendons: Connect the muscle in the upper arm to the bones near the front shoulder and to the radius bone at the elbow. These tendons help bend (flex) the elbow and rotate the forearm.
  • Tricep brachii tendons: Connect the muscle in the upper arm to the bones near the shoulder and to the ulna bone at the back of the elbow. These tendons help straighten (extend) the elbow.
  • Brachialis tendon: Connects the muscle in the upper arm to the ulna bone of the forearm near the elbow. This tendon helps bend (flex) the elbow.
  • Brachioradialis tendons: Connect the muscle in the forearm to the humerus bone in the upper arm and the radius bone in the forearm near the wrist. These tendons help bend (flex) the elbow.
  • Supinator tendons: Connect the muscle in the forearm to the humerus bone in the upper arm and the radius bone in the forearm near the elbow. These tendons allow the muscle to rotate the forearm.

View full-detail illustrations on the interactive anatomy page at www.HandCare.org for more information.

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