Monthly Archives: Jan 2016

Hand Hand Therapy Pain

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist on Central Sensitization: Why do I still have pain?

Closeup portrait young man having acute bad joint pain in his hands writer's cramp massaging them sitting in chair isolated outdoors background

Why do I have pain?

Pain, in its most basic form, is a protective response the body uses to survive. Responses and reactions to pain can vary from person to person. Our brain interprets the signals from our body as either non harmful or harmful (pain). Pain is not always an indicator of damage. For example, recall how painful a paper cut is!

Why has my pain lasted so long?

While pain can be a good, protective response in the body, sometimes our pain experience can last longer or be more intense than a typical pain response to an injury or surgery.

Typically, when we get hurt, say a cut to the finger, our body interprets this as a ‘flight or fight’ response. This response includes increased blood flow, pain, swelling and redness to the area temporarily until the threat passes. This is controlled by something called the sympathetic nervous system. Once the threat passes, the body calms down. As it returns to a normal state, the pain and swelling also decrease.

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Finger Hand Nail Bed Injury

Nail Bed Injuries: Types, Causes and Treatment

Close up of man hand holding blank advertising card on white

Dr. Avery Arora with Michigan Surgery Specialists explains the causes of and treatment options for nailbed injuries.

The hand has a substantial number of bones, not to mention quite a few other important parts including ligaments, tendons, joints, the nails and the nail bed. An injury to the hand can cause damage to any and all of these locations. The nail and the nail bed are two of the areas that many people rarely consider when they think about injuries to their hand.

Types of Injuries to the Nail Bed

The most common type of nail injury is a crushing injury, which could happen to a single nail, or several at the same time depending on what happens. Dropping something heavy on the hand, and having it hit the nails or hitting the nail with a hammer while working are just two of the possible ways that you could have a crushing injury to the nail. It’s also possible to puncture the nail. Injuries to the nail bed could also mean there is damage to other parts of your finger and hand.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Therapy

What is a hand therapist?

What is a Hand Therapist FINAL FINAL

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Hand Hand Surgeon

7 Myths About Your Hands

Doctor's hand holding a wrinkled elderly hand

from Everyday Health

By Glenn D. Cohen, MD, Special to Everyday Health

People all over the world of various cultures, religions, and nationalities use their hands to greet one another, communicate through sign language, hold their babies, do work, and more. Hands are a universal part of our humanity, and the hand is one of the most vital parts of the body. Here’s proof: One-fourth of the motor cortex in the brain is dedicated to controlling muscles in your hands. Yet what I’ve learned as a hand surgeon is that many people don’t know a lot about their hands. Here are some hand misconceptions I’ve encountered over the years.

Myth No. 1: If You Can Move Your Finger, Wrist, or Elbow, It Isn’t Broken

Recently, I treated a tough young defensive end who was sure his finger wasn’t broken because he could move it. He insisted on getting back in the game. “Just because you can move it doesn’t mean it’s not broken,” I told him. Only a doctor, using an X-ray, can make the definitive call.

In high school football, the hand is the most commonly fractured body part, according to a study published in 2012 in The American Journal of Sports Medicine. More than 150,000 football players under age 15 seek treatment for injuries each year, and one out of every seven of those injuries are to the hand, finger, or wrist.

Read the full story at Everyday Health.

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Arm Casts and Splints Hand Hand Safety

How to take care of your arm cast

Close-up of a young woman's hand in plaster.

Whether it’s an arm cast, wrist splint or finger splint, many types of casts can help your recovery from surgery or an injury. Casts are hard, made with plaster or fiberglass, while splints are lighter and can be taken on and off more easily. These are important to protecting you while your injury heals, so follow these tips to take good care of your cast or splint:

  1. Keep your cast or splint clean and dry. Getting it wet could irritate your skin. Cover it with a plastic bag, seal it with tape or rubber bands to keep it dry, and elevate it overhead while showering.
  2. Do not let dirt, sand or other materials get inside your cast or splint.
  3. Do not stick objects in your cast. If you feel itchy, ask your doctor for advice.
  4. Never attempt to trim your cast. If there are rough edges or your skin is irritated around the ends, contact your doctor.
  5. Contact your doctor if your cast or splint has a crack or soft spot.
  6. Never attempt to remove a cast yourself.

Be sure to contact your doctor if you have worsening pain, excessive swelling, numbness or tingling in your fingers, burning or stinging, or loss of movement in your fingers while wearing a cast. Learn more about casts and splints at www.HandCare.org.

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Hand Hand Safety Ski and Snowboard Injury Thumb

Random Fact: Skiing Injuries

Close up of female skier hands  holding ski poles.Did you know? One of the most common skiing injuries is a thumb ligament tear. Learn how to avoid a ski or snowboard injury this winter at www.HandCare.org.

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