Hand Hand Surgeon

7 Myths About Your Hands

Doctor's hand holding a wrinkled elderly hand

from Everyday Health

By Glenn D. Cohen, MD, Special to Everyday Health

People all over the world of various cultures, religions, and nationalities use their hands to greet one another, communicate through sign language, hold their babies, do work, and more. Hands are a universal part of our humanity, and the hand is one of the most vital parts of the body. Here’s proof: One-fourth of the motor cortex in the brain is dedicated to controlling muscles in your hands. Yet what I’ve learned as a hand surgeon is that many people don’t know a lot about their hands. Here are some hand misconceptions I’ve encountered over the years.

Myth No. 1: If You Can Move Your Finger, Wrist, or Elbow, It Isn’t Broken

Recently, I treated a tough young defensive end who was sure his finger wasn’t broken because he could move it. He insisted on getting back in the game. “Just because you can move it doesn’t mean it’s not broken,” I told him. Only a doctor, using an X-ray, can make the definitive call.

In high school football, the hand is the most commonly fractured body part, according to a study published in 2012 in The American Journal of Sports Medicine. More than 150,000 football players under age 15 seek treatment for injuries each year, and one out of every seven of those injuries are to the hand, finger, or wrist.

Read the full story at Everyday Health.

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