Monthly Archives: Mar 2016

Finger Hand Hand Surgeon Jammed Finger

Ask a Doctor: Jammed Finger

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. David J. Bozentka answers your questions about jammed fingers and what to do about them.

Why should I be concerned about my jammed finger?

A “jammed” finger is a common injury due to direct force to the tip of a finger.  The injury may occur during a variety of activities such as a thrown ball or a fall onto the hand.  It often leads to pain, swelling and the inability to move your finger well.  In general, a jammed finger means there is an injury to the middle joint of the finger, called the “proximal interphalangeal joint” (PIP joint).  Ligaments, tendons or bones can be involved.  Many people assume it will get better, so they delay treatment, but early treatment is important to prevent permanent stiffness and deformity in your finger.

What should I do if I have a jammed finger?

As with most joint injuries, you should initially rest, ice and elevate the finger to decrease swelling.  A finger splint can be used for comfort.

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Elbow Hand Hand Therapy Wrist

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist on Desk Posture

a woman sitting at a desk and has pain in the back. symbol photo for proper posture at work in the office.

I sit at a desk most of the workday, keyboarding. My wrists and elbows are always aching. Is there anything I can do?

If you spend most of your day at a desk, your work station should be evaluated and adjusted to ensure proper positioning and desk posture. Your work station should be set up specifically for you. There are many symptoms that may occur from sitting at a poorly designed work station. These symptoms include fatigue or soreness of wrists, elbows, neck, scapular region and lower back. Eventually, if these signs aren’t addressed, you may start to experience pain or numbness and tingling in these areas. If your work station is shared, it should be adjustable to fit the needs of all who use that workstation.

What should my work station look like?

Proper workstation assessment should include looking at the height of your chair, the type of keyboard and mouse you’re using, and position of your monitor. Proper height of your chair should allow ankles, knees, hips and elbows to rest at 90 degrees.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

What to expect at a hand surgery consultation

Male doctor talking with patient seriously at clinic. Close-up.

Dr. Avery Arora, MD discusses what a hand surgeon may ask you if you are considering surgery and what questions you should ask your hand surgeon.


When you go in for a hand surgery consultation, it is extremely important for the patient to be honest and open with the doctor regarding their health. While the exact questions may differ depending on the type of procedure and the reason for the procedure, the types of questions will generally have a number of similarities.

What types of questions will the doctor ask?

For example, the doctor will want to know if you have any other medical conditions, if you are going through any other medical treatments at the time, and if you have ever had any other surgeries. They want to know if you have any known drug allergies, as well as what medications you may be taking currently. They need to make sure that there is nothing that will interfere with the surgery. In addition to prescription and over the counter drugs, you need to let them know about tobacco use, alcohol and other drugs, as these could have an effect on whether you are a good candidate for surgery or not.

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Ganglion Cysts Hand Lumps and Bumps Wrist

5 treatment options for a Ganglion Cyst

ganglion cysts

A ganglion cyst is a lump in the hand or wrist that is not uncommon. The cysts can vary in size or even disappear completely, and they may or may not be painful. Usually, they are round-shaped and can be firm, and it may be painful to put pressure on the bump. Treatment for ganglion cysts depends on the location of the cyst and your personal situation. Here are some options your hand surgeon may recommend:

  1. Observation: Sometimes, doing nothing is the best option, as the cyst may go away.
  2. Splints: Material used to support the area.
  3. Anti-inflammatory medication: This may decrease pain during your daily activities. It can be used along with a splint.
  4. Aspiration: Using a needle to remove fluid from the cyst.
  5. Surgery: Completely removing the cyst.

Consult your doctor about the best treatment option for you. Learn more about ganglion cysts and find a hand surgeon at www.HandCare.org.

 

 

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Hand Wrist Wrist Fracture

Wrist Fractures: Causes and Treatment

Learn about wrist fractures, what causes them, and how to treat them in this video from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.

A wrist fracture is a medical term for a broken wrist. There are different types of wrist fractures. It can be “non-displaced,” which means the bones do not move out of place, or it can be “displaced,” when the bones need to be put back in the right place with a cast or splint. Both of these fractures are stable. It can also be unstable, which means the bone may have shattered and cannot be fixed with a cast or splint.

Fractures can be treated with a cast, splint or even surgery. It depends on your personal circumstances. Learn more about wrist fractures, and view additional videos at www.HandCare.org.

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Animal Bite Hand Infection

Random Fact: Animal Bites

Portrait of yellow-eyed cat. close-up of cat face

Did you know? Dog bites are the most common type of animal bite, but cat bites cause more infections. Learn more about animal bites and how to treat them.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Surgery

How to prepare for surgery

Preparing for Surgery v1

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