Monthly Archives: Aug 2016

Back Pain Backpacks Hand Hand Therapy

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist – Backpack Awareness

backpack cropped

“Pack it Light, Wear it Right” 

Q: As a parent of elementary school children and teens, I’ve often wondered if the books they are carrying in their backpacks are too heavy.

A: Your intuition is on track. Statistics tell us that 79 million students in the U.S. carry heavy loads in backpacks. The risk associated with having back pain at an early age is that it often lasts through adulthood. In 2013, the U.S. Consumer Product and Safety Commission reported nearly 22,200 strains, sprains, fractures and dislocations from school-age children and young adults carrying backpacks who were treated in emergency rooms, physician offices and clinics.

Q: Are there guidelines for the weight these children should be carrying in their backpacks? 

A: Yes there is, and it is easy to remember. The backpack should not weigh more than 10% of the child’s body weight. Students and parents need to pay serious attention to this guideline. One study showed 55% of students carried backpacks heavier than the guideline.

Here are some tips to consider when purchasing your child’s school backpack this month (follow the links below for more details):

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Hand Wrist Wrist Pain

7 causes of ulnar-sided wrist pain

people, healthcare and problem concept - close up of man suffering from pain in hand oe wrist at home

The “pinkie” side of the wrist is also known as the ulnar side. Pain on this side can be very common. It can result from injury to bones, cartilage, ligaments or tendons. Due to this wide range of causes, it can be difficult to determine why the pain is happening. Here are some possible causes of ulnar-sided wrist pain:

  1. Wrist fracture
  2. Arthritis of the joint(s) between the bones
  3. Ulnar Impaction Syndrome (when the ulna is longer than the radius, which can cause it to “bump into” the smaller wrist bones)
  4. Inflammation or irritation of the tendons that bend and extend the wrist
  5. Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Injury (TFCC) (when the connection between the ulna bone and other structures in the wrist is torn by an injury or frayed over time)
  6. Nerve injury or compression
  7. Tumors, most commonly ganglion cysts, that are benign
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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Hand Surgery Pain

5 Ways You Can Ease Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Pain Without Surgery

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from the Cleveland Clinic

Does the thumb side of your hand feel like it’s going to sleep — that weak, numb, pins-and-needles feeling — for no apparent reason? You may suspect that you have carpal tunnel syndrome.

The good news is that there are a number of methods you can try at home to ease your pain. And if those don’t work, surgery can be a highly effective treatment.

What is carpel tunnel syndrome?

Carpel tunnel syndrome is a fairly common condition that affects the hand and wrist, says hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder surgeon William Seitz, MD.

“Symptoms include numbness, tingling and pain, usually in your thumb and the first three fingers of your hand,” Dr. Seitz says.

Carpel tunnel syndrome happens when the median nerve, which runs from your forearm to your hand through a narrow space called the carpel tunnel, is compressed or pinched, Dr. Seitz says.

Read the full story.

 

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Emergency Room Hand Injury

When to visit the emergency room

when-to-visit-the-er

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Bones Dislocated Elbow Elbow Hand

Taking care of a dislocated elbow

a man holds his painful, aching elbow ** Note: Shallow depth of field

Guest post by Avery Arora, MD

When the bones in the forearm are moved out of place with the bones in the upper part of the arm, the result is usually a dislocated elbow. All of the bones in the arm meet at the elbow joint, and dislocating the joint is a very serious injury.

What causes a dislocated elbow?

The dislocation of an elbow generally stems from some type of traumatic force that causes the bones to push apart from one another. This can happen during many types of sports, as well as in auto accidents. It can also occur when someone falls onto his or her outstretched arms and tries to stop the fall.

What are the signs and symptoms?

Those who have dislocated their elbow will generally experience an enormous amount of pain when the injury occurs. They will no longer be able to continue with whatever activity they were doing, as the pain will be too bad and they will have limited movement. The greatest amount of pain is generally felt at the elbow, but pain can also be in the rest of the arm, the hand, and the fingers.

It’s often possible to feel the elbow “pop” out of place when the injury occurs. The area around the elbow will also begin to swell. In the most serious cases, it can cause damage to the blood vessels, which will result in a loss of pulse in the arm. This is very serious and requires immediate medical care.

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Hand Hand Safety Power Saws

How to safely use a power saw

close up of circular saw and saw dust

Power saws are extremely powerful tools that can be dangerous to those who use them. While this tool can be useful for cutting different types of materials, it can cause serious hand injuries that may result in the loss of a hand or finger. Exercise power saw safety by following these important tips:

  1. Never use your hands to clear the scraps from a sawing worktable. Instead, use a push stick.
  2. Do not wear loose clothing,  jewelry or work gloves. They may get caught in the blade.
  3. Use sharp blades. Dull blades cause binding, stalling and possible kickback.
  4. Never drink alcohol while using a saw.
  5. When starting, let the saw reach full speed before cutting, and support the work firmly so it will not shift.
  6. NEVER look away from your work for any reason.
  7. Use the correct blade for the application. Set it for the correct depth to minimize the amount of exposed blade.
  8. Never disable safety guards, and always read instructions first.
  9. When starting or stopping the saw, make sure the work is not touching the blade.
  10. Lower a table saw blade below the table top when finished.
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Anatomy Arm Bones

Anatomy 101: Arm Bones

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While the hand is made up of many small bones, the arm consists of three large bones. The arm bones are:

  1. Humerus: This bone runs from the shoulder to the elbow.
  2. Radius: This is one of two bones in the forearm. It is on the thumb side of the forearm (radial side). This bone spins around the ulna when you move your palm up and down.
  3. Ulna: This is the other bone in the forearm. It is on the pinkie side (ulnar side) of the forearm. This bone does not spin.

Learn more about other bones of the upper extremity, including shoulder bones and hand bones in the anatomy section at www.HandCare.org. Here you can also learn about broken bones (i.e. how to know when your arm is broken and how it can be treated) and search for a hand surgeon to treat your injury.

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Hand Hand Surgery Hand Transplant Prosthetics

WATCH: Zion Harvey, 1st child to receive double-hand transplant, throws 1st pitch at Orioles game

levin and zion

from NJ.com

The doctors at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia truly are amazing and the latest example caused a standing ovation at Tuesday night’s Baltimore Orioles game at Camden Yards. Prior to the game, nine-year-old Zion Harvey threw out the first pitch to Orioles outfielder Adam Jones.

While a nine-year-old throwing out the first pitch would be a fun story on its own, Harvey’s path to that moment made it special.

Roughly one year ago, Harvey—a Maryland resident—became the first child in history to undergo successful bilateral hand transplant surgery at CHOP in Philadelphia. When Harvey was two, he developed an infection that led to his hands and feet amputated. Years later, the doctors at CHOP helped remake his life and what happened in Baltimore on Tuesday night possible.

Watch the video and read the full story.

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