Monthly Archives: Nov 2016

Dupuytren's Contracture Finger Hand Lumps and Bumps

Ask a Doctor – Dupuytren’s Contracture

ask-a-doctor_dupuytren

 

Dr. Steven H. Goldberg answers your questions about Dupuytren’s contracture.

I noticed a new lump on the palm of my hand, and I noticed my tendon is visible and tight where I can’t fully straighten my finger. What could this be?

Dupuytren’s contracture, or fibromatosis, is a condition that can cause lumps on the palm of the hand; it also causes cords on the palm or fingers. The cord is not the tendon but rather a thickening of the fascia, a normal structure below the skin. The cord contains myofibroblasts which have a muscle-like quality that pull on the skin causing puckering, dimpling, and bending of the finger. The lumps and cords can also occur on the soles of the feet. Some people are more likely to have this disease due to genetics.

How do you know this lump is Dupuytren’s and not cancer?

Most lumps in the palm are not cancerous. Skin cancers are more common in sun-exposed areas, so a lump on the back of the hand is more likely to be cancerous compared to one on the palm.  Dupuytren’s lumps in the palm of the hand most commonly form in the ring and small finger. Skin puckering or dimpling can occur, and you typically can’t fully straighten your fingers. This loss of motion is less common with other masses or tumors. Dupuytren’s lumps are typically not painful and usually do not grow much.  A more worrisome bump or lump is often painful, can have rapid growth, and can either be painful at night or when resting. If a patient is very concerned about the lump, it can be surgically biopsied to confirm it is Dupuytren’s contracture.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

What is Office-Based Hand Surgery?

Male doctor talking with patient seriously at clinic. Close-up.

from Fox 17 West Michigan

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — Hands and wrists are subject to a variety of problems that result in pain, weakness or numbness. Thanks to a new technique, three doctors in Grand Rapids are fixing those problems quicker — and cheaper — than ever before.

It’s called office-based hand surgery, and during the procedure, the patient is wide awake.

Normally, if you have carpal tunnel syndrome, which causes numbness, tingling, or weakness in the hand, you would go to a hospital, undergo a number of tests, get put under anesthesia, and pay thousands of dollars for treatment.

Office-based hand surgery is not only cheaper, it’s safer and saves time.

Ryan Ganzevoort underwent hand surgery two weeks ago at Spectrum Health Medical Group. When he found the procedure took less than 10 minutes in the doctor’s office, it was a no-brainer, he says.

Read the full story.

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Cuts Hand Safety Turkey Carving

How to Safely Carve a Turkey

Roasted turkey on a server tray garnished with fresh figs grape kumquat and herbs on fall harvest table. Red wine side dishes pie and gravy. Decoraded with mini pumpkins candels and flowers.

Every year, too many people cut their hand while carving a turkey. These injuries can be serious, sometimes resulting in amputation of the finger. Luckily, they are avoidable. Follow these tips to safely carve a turkey this Thanksgiving:

  • Never cut toward yourself. Your free hand should be placed opposite the side you are carving toward. Don’t place your hand underneath the blade to catch the slice of meat.
  • Keep your knife handles and cutting area dry to avoid slips. Good lighting around the cutting area is also important.
  • Keep all cutting utensils sharp. Having a sharp knife will avoid the need to use a lot of force when cutting, which can be dangerous. Dull knives are more likely to cause slips and are still sharp enough to cause an injury. If possible, use an electric knife.
  • Use kitchen shears to tackle the job of cutting bones.
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Hand Hand Therapy Posture Stretching

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist – Desk Posture Part II

Rear view of young businesswoman sitting at desk stretching. Copy space

Spending extended periods of time at a workstation places high levels of stress on our body, especially our arms and hands. The more time we spend at our work station, the more our muscles fatigue and gravity pulls our body forward. The result is rounded shoulders and a forward head position. Standing or sitting in a static desk posture throughout the day places a lot of stress on our tendons, nerves and muscles. The nerves in our shoulders and arms can become compressed and irritable, which can result in numbness and tingling in our hands. The muscles at the front of our chest (our pectoralis muscles) become tight and the muscles between our shoulder blades become overstretched. As a result, we can develop painful trigger points in these muscles. Over, time these issues become more difficult to correct.

Here are some simple exercises to help prevent these issues:

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Hand Jammed Finger Mallet Finger Sports Injury

Video: Causes and Treatment of Mallet Finger


Mallet Finger
, sometimes known as baseball finger, happens when the top part of the finger is injured, forcing your finger to droop down and no longer straighten. Watch our short, 3-minute video to learn more about this injury and how to treat it. The video features NBA basketball player Dirk Nowitzki.

This injury is common in sports because it is easy for a basketball, baseball or football to strike the finger forcibly. While it may just seem like a jammed finger (you will have pain, swelling and bruising), there can be serious damage with a mallet finger. Early treatment is very important, especially if you see blood under the nail. Your doctor may treat you with a splint, cast or surgery, depending on how severe the injury is.

Learn more about this injury at www.HandCare.org.

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Anatomy Arteries Hand Vascular Disorders Veins

5 Causes of Vascular Disorders

radial-artery

If you have a vascular disorder, it means you have a problem with arteries and veins. Arteries are pipes that bring blood from the heart to the fingers. Veins are pipes that return the used blood back to the heart and lungs. There can be many different causes of vascular problems. Here are five common causes:

  1. Traumatic injury
  2. Flattening of pipes
  3. Blocked pipes
  4. Tumors or deformed, tangled pipes, which may or may not be present at birth
  5. Vessel spasms

Some signs of vascular problems include pain, color changes in the fingertips, wounds that won’t heal, numb hands and swelling.

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Bones Broken Arm Elbow Fracture Fracture Hand Fracture Shoulder Fracture

Random Fact: Broken Bone

Close-up of a young woman's hand in plaster.

Did you know? Just because you can move a body part doesn’t mean a bone isn’t broken. Learn more about the signs of a broken bone in the hand, arm, elbow and shoulder.

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