Monthly Archives: Jan 2017

Hand Wrist Wrist Fracture

5 Signs of a Wrist Fracture

A wrist fracture is a medical term for a broken wrist. Breaking your wrist can involve any of the eight small bones that make up the wrist, which are connected to the forearm bones called the radius and the ulna. The radius is the most common bone to break in a wrist fracture. This injury typically happens from falling on an outstretched hand, but it can also result from traumatic events such as a car accident. While wrist fractures can vary in severity, here are five signs that you may have broken your wrist rather than simply spraining it:

  1. Pain and swelling in the wrist
  2. Inability or difficulty using the hand or wrist
  3. Deformed-looking wrist
  4. Pain with finger movement
  5. Numb or tingling fingers
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Arm Hand Numbness Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Can a T-Shirt Improve Posture and Help Treat Arm Pain?

Are you someone who suffers from thoracic outlet syndrome and has arm pain? Perhaps this special t-shirt is for you!

Arm pain and tingling is a common symptom of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). TOS is a term used to describe compression in the space between the collarbone and the first rib. Other symptoms include numbness in the arm and hand, pain and aches in the neck, shoulder or hand and arm fatigue with activity. While the cause of TOS is compression, the cause of the compression can be due to a number of factors. One common offender is poor posture. The posture that is often associated with TOS is drooping or rounded shoulders and holding the head in a forward position.

TOS is often treated with rehabilitation, medication and sometimes surgery. During rehabilitation treatment, an emphasis is placed on improving posture through exercises, stretches and use of athletic taping techniques. Taping provides support and gentle feedback to guide the shoulder into a better position. A more recent development is a t-shirt that mimics the taping technology and accomplishes a similar effect with greater ease.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

Video: Preparing for Surgery


Surgery can be a scary thing. Not only does it mean your body will be undergoing a procedure, but it also requires taking time off work, receiving help at home and coordinating transportation to and from surgery. Despite these obstacles, surgeon members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand will ensure that your surgical experience is a good one. Your hand surgeon wants the best outcome for you.

To achieve the best outcome, your surgeon will be well prepared prior to your surgery. Reviewing the procedure with you is just one way your doctor will prepare. Watch our short, 1-minute video above to learn more about preparing for surgery.

Visit www.HandCare.org to read about different hand surgeries and how a hand surgeon can help you.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Hand Surgery

Random Fact: Recovering from Carpal Tunnel Surgery

technology, home and lifestyle concept - close up of man working with laptop computer and sitting on sofa at home

Did you know? After carpal tunnel surgery, you can begin using a keyboard again within two weeks. Now that’s a fast recovery! Learn more about Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and how it’s treated.

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Hand Hand Safety Snowblower Safety

How to Practice Snowblower Safety

Snow being removed during winter storm using snow blower.

As the snow piles up this winter, now is the time to use snowblowers, the quickest way to clear snow from your driveway and sidewalk. However, snowblowers can be dangerous and cause serious accidents. In fact, the most common snowblower injury is amputated fingertips, which results from misusing the machine.

Snowblower accidents typically occur when the snow is heavy and wet or has accumulated about 6 inches or more. Here are important tips to practice snowblower safety this season:

To keep your machine from clogging:

  • Work at a brisk pace. The faster the blades and pace, the less likely the snow will stick.
  • If heavy, wet snow is anticipated, consider snowblowing several times during the snowfall.
  • Some people spray the blades and chute with cooking oil spray. This may help.
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Hand Hand Surgery Scars

Surgical Scar Tissue: A Less-Talked-About Side Effect

Vector medical concept Surgeons in operation theater. Room with people, scalpel and screen disease and pulse patient, assistant doctor illustration. Team doctors in the operating room with the patient

from US News & World Report

When the short-term effects of surgery – such as oozing wounds and incision pain – have long faded, an unseen complication may be lurking beneath the skin. Excess scar tissue, layers deep, can significantly reduce function and movement months after surgery. And on the skin’s surface, visible, lingering scars might be noticeable enough to really bother patients. Before you undergo surgery, here’s what to know about reducing scarring as you heal.

Bend and straighten your elbow. The folds that form in your skin, known as Langer’s lines, represent the direction and orientation of the collagen fibers, similar to the grain of wood, says Dr. Robert Klapper, director of the Joint Replacement Program in Orthopaedic Surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. During surgery, it’s not always possible for surgeons to cut parallel to the grain with their scalpels.

“If you are not able, because of heart surgery for example, to get down to the sternum, we as surgeons have to violate the Langer’s line,” Klapper says. “This can often lead to keloids and bumps and poor healing, and extra scar tissue can take place.”

Performing joint surgery, Klapper says, involves cutting into multiple layers of anatomy: the epidermis or skin surface; subcutaneous fat; fascia or connective tissue; muscles, tendons and ligaments; and the lining around the bone called the ostium. “It’s kind of like a seven-layer cake, if you will,” he says. “As a surgeon, you must respect in your repair of the surgery all layers of the seven-layer cake. All should get closed properly.”

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