Monthly Archives: May 2017

Avocado Cuts Hand Safety Knife Safety

How to Cut an Avocado Without Cutting Yourself

from The New York Times

Avocados may seem harmless, but if you’ve ever peeled and cut one, you know they can be more than a little troublesome. They’re slippery, they’re oddly shaped, and they have that annoying pit in the middle that rarely slips out as easily as you’d like.

These characteristics have earned the avocado a reputation as one of the most dangerous foods to cut. Just recently, the wife of a colleague here at The New York Times was slicing an avocado when she suffered a cut so deep she had to be taken to the emergency room.

Medical professionals and hospitals in the United States don’t track kitchen injuries by ingredient, but anecdotally, doctors say they see a number of avocado-related cooking injuries annually — enough to notice.

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Baseball Elbow Hand Sports Injury

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Treating Tommy John Injuries

Baseball season is in full swing for the pros. Unfortunately, for many youth baseball players, summer leagues are just one of the year-round seasons they play. A Tommy John injury (injury of the ulnar collateral ligament at the elbow) was unheard of in youth leagues in the mid-90s. By 2010, the adolescent rate was nearly 40 percent. As a baseball enthusiast, I find this trend disturbing. I asked Dr. Bobby Chhabra, Chair of the Orthopedic Department at the University of Virginia, his perception of this epidemic.

“Every year I see more and more adolescent elbow injuries from pitching and throwing. These injuries vary across a spectrum from little leaguer’s elbow, to muscle strains, to UCL injuries (Tommy John), and cartilage injuries. I would agree that the adolescent rate is increasing and the trend shows that this group may soon reach half of all surgeries performed to repair a Tommy John injury. 

The reasons for this are likely multi-factorial but include the increasing number of kids who play one sport and pitch year round from a young age, have poor mechanics, have fatigue leading to poor mechanics and injury, and have overuse with minimal rest.  

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CMC Boss Hand Hand Pain Lumps and Bumps

How to Know if You Have a CMC Boss

A carpometacarpal boss, also known as a CMC boss or “bossing,” is a lump that appears on the back of the hand. It is typically in line with the pointer or middle finger. The exact cause of it is unknown, although sometimes they can arise from a traumatic injury or repetitive wrist motion that can happen during things like golf.

Here are some signs that you have a CMC boss:

  • You notice a lump on the back of your hand
  • It appeared between the ages of 20 and 40
  • You feel pain when moving the wrist up or down
  • You feel a snapping sensation when moving the wrist
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Hand Rotator Cuff Shoulder Shoulder Pain

5 Potential Causes of Shoulder Pain

Shoulder pain can be caused by a wide variety of issues. This is because the shoulder is comprised of several key structures, including tendons, cartilage and bone. The shoulder itself is a ball-and-socket joint, which allows a wide range of movement.

Shoulder pain can range from pain simply with moving the shoulder to the inability to lift the arm overhead or feeling weak. Here are five potential causes of such shoulder pain:

  1. Shoulder Arthritis: This can be caused by everyday wear and tear.
  2. Frozen Shoulder: If you have frozen shoulder, the inner lining of your shoulder has become inflamed and tight, preventing you from having full motion and also causing pain.
  3. Shoulder Dislocation: A dislocation is when the ball slides out of the socket. This is most commonly caused by an athletic injury or fall.
  4.  Shoulder Fractures: A shoulder fracture is another word for a broken shoulder. It can be a break of the ball, socket or scapula.
  5. Rotator Cuff Injuries: The rotator cuff is where the four tendons that encompass the ball of the shoulder meet. Injuries to the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain.
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Finger Hand Thumb Trigger Finger

Video: Symptoms and Treatment for Trigger Finger

Trigger Finger is a common but debilitating condition of the hand. Its formal name is stenosing tenosynovitis and is sometimes called “trigger thumb.” Many times, the finger will lock up. Other symptoms include:

  • Pain at the base of the thumb or finger
  • Sensitivity to pressure
  • Lumps
  • Popping
  • Limited finger movement

Trigger Finger can interfere with daily activities such as cooking, playing music, typing, etc. Surgery can be an option for treating this condition, but night splints, medication, or steroid injections can also be possibilities. Watch our 5-minute video above for more information about trigger finger. You can also visit our trigger finger page.

Treatment for a hand condition varies depending on your situation. Find a hand surgeon near you to determine your best course of action.

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Finger Hand Texting Thumb Thumb Pain

Random Fact: Texting Thumb

Did you know? There is no technical diagnosis called “texting thumb,” but pain from repetitive motions, such as texting, can be treated. Learn more.

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