Monthly Archives: Aug 2017

Burns Grilling Hand Hand Safety

How to Grill Safely

Outdoor grilling is a favorite summer activity in the U.S. It’s fun, easy, and produces great tasting food. But grilling also poses a safety risk, whether you are using a charcoal or gas grill. Your hands are exposed to high heat and susceptible to burns. Here’s how to grill safely:

Always wear gloves.

When turning food or removing items from the grill, always use potholders or insulated gloves to protect your hands from the heat. The flame could flare up without notice.

Use long utensils.

Use long utensils that are meant for grilling when placing food on the grill, turning it or removing it so that your hands do not get too close to the flame.

Avoid grilling on windy days.

The winds can cause the flame to jump which may burn your hands or start clothing on fire.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

5 Steps to Removing a Stuck Ring

Getting a ring stuck on your finger is not uncommon. It can happen if you force a ring onto your finger that is too small, but it can also happen over time. Sometimes, your joints become arthritic, causing the joints or tissue to swell, which can cause the ring to get stuck.

Here’s an easy way to remove a stuck ring in 5 steps:

  1. Squirt some Windex (or some soap or oil) on the finger and ring to lubricate it.
  2. Elevate the hand overhead for 5-10 minutes with ice around the ring and finger.
  3. Slide a long string of dental floss (or other thread) under the stuck ring with the bulk of it toward the fingertip (Figure 1).
  4. Beginning at the top of the ring, tightly wrap the floss around and around your finger all the way up and over the knuckle (Figure 2).
  5. Take the opposite end of the string and begin to unwrap the floss. The ring will slide over the knuckle as you go (Figure 3).
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Anatomy Bones Shoulder

Anatomy 101: Shoulder Bones

There are five major bones in the shoulder. The shoulder bones can easily be affected by falls or accidents, in addition to arthritis. Here is an overview of the shoulder bones:

  1. Scapula: Another name for this bone is the shoulder blade. There are 17 muscles that attach to the scapula! Much of your shoulder motion is between the scapula and the chest. The scapula is part of the “shoulder girdle” which also includes muscle and ligament that allow your shoulder to move.
  2. Clavicle: This bone is also referred to as the collar bone. The clavicle connects the arm to the chest. It has joints on both ends, which can become arthritic.
  3. Acromion: This bone is a flat projection of the scapula that gives the shoulder its square shape.
  4. Coracoid Process: This bone is also a projection of the scapula. It points outward toward the front of the body. This bone is important because its muscles and ligaments help support the clavicle, shoulder joint and humerus.
  5. Glenoid Cavity: This is the socket portion of the ball-and-socket joint of the shoulder. Any abnormalities in the cavity can cause joint instability, which can lead to a condition called “frozen shoulder.”

Learn more about the shoulder bones and the anatomy of the upper extremity (including the hand, wrist, arm and shoulder) at www.HandCare.org/hand-arm-anatomy.

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