Monthly Archives: Feb 2018

Hand Hand Safety Hand Therapy Snowblower Safety

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Preventing Injuries During Snow Removal

The winter months can be a festive and fun time of year; however, they can also bring many hazards that can lead to hand, wrist, elbow or shoulder injuries. Snow shoveling and removal are strenuous and sometimes risky activities that are necessary in these snowy months, and should be addressed with some simple safety measures to protect yourself from potential injury.

Common safety steps to take when addressing snow removal include:

  • Warm up before tackling snow removal – Doing a short amount of light exercise to warm your body prior to shoveling snow can assist in reducing your risk of injury.
  • Wearing gloves with skid resistant material – One simple strategy to combat the snow is to be sure your gloves and/or mittens have a skid resistant material on the palm and fingers. This will allow you to have adequate grip on your shovel to prevent unnecessary slipping of your equipment.
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Cubital Tunnel Syndrome Elbow Hand Nerves

3 Causes of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome is a condition that involves the ulnar nerve, also known as the “funny bone” nerve, which runs on the inner side of the elbow. This condition can cause numbness or tingling in the ring finger and small finger (sometimes referred to as “pins and needles”), pain in the forearm, loss of sensation and/or weakness in the hand.

Here are three potential causes of this condition:

  1. Pressure: The ulnar nerve has little padding over it, so direct pressure (like leaning your arm on an arm rest) can cause the arm and hand — especially the ring and small fingers — to “fall asleep.”
  2. Stretching: Keeping the elbow bent for a long time can stretch the ulnar nerve.  This can happen while you sleep or if you are holding a phone for a long period of time, for example.
  3. Anatomy: Sometimes, the ulnar nerve simply does not stay in its place. It will snap back and forth over a bony bump as you move your elbow, which can irritate the nerve.
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Finger Hand Hangnail

Why You Should Never, Ever Rip Off Your Hangnail

Hang Nail

from Men’s Health

Hangnails can make any grown man wince. They’re pesky, and even though they’re so small, they can hurt like hell.

“Most people don’t notice a hangnail until after it has fully developed and they feel roughness around the nail or pain from inflammation,” says Benjamin J. Jacobs, M.D., hand surgeon at Rebound Orthopedics and Neurosurgery in Portland, Oregon.

But they happen to everyone, and they can be particularly bad in winter months. But here’s how to prevent hangnails from happening and the best ways treat the ones that already exist.

Read the full story.

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Finger Hand Swan Neck Deformity

What is a Swan Neck Deformity?

Swan Neck Deformity
A Swan Neck Deformity is a deformity of the finger in which the middle joint is bent back more than normal, and the tip of the finger is bent down. Sometimes, this deformity can be caused by an injury. Other times, it can happen over time due to a condition such as rheumatoid arthritis.

The odd bending of the finger is usually due to a tear of a ligament in the middle joint of the finger.  Sometimes, the tendon is torn. It causes the tendon to become weak. Eventually, the ability of the tendons to straighten the joint becomes lessened, causing the bending. Here are some signs that you have a Swan Neck Deformity:

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Anatomy Arteries Blood Vessels Hand

Anatomy 101: Arteries of the Arm

There are 5 arteries in the arm and shoulder that supply blood to the body.

Arteries are muscle-lined tubes in the body that transport blood from the heart to other parts of the body. In the upper extremity, there are two arteries that pass through the axilla, also known as the “armpit.” These arteries are:

  • Subclavian Artery: This is the large vessel that begins the blood supply to the upper extremity.  It begins near the heart and travels under the clavicle bone toward the shoulder.  Eventually it turns into the axillary artery.
  • Axillary Artery: This is a continuation of the subclavian artery. This artery travels deep in the arm pit, feeding muscles and bones around the shoulder with its branches. It eventually turns into the brachial artery.
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