Monthly Archives: Mar 2019

Hand Hand Surgery Opioids Pain Surgery

Ask a Doctor: What to Expect After Surgery

Dr. Ekkehard Bonatz answers your questions about what to expect after you’ve had hand surgery.

Q: I’ve been told I will have a cast, splint, or brace. What does that mean?

A: Many surgeries require a short time of protection to allow your body to start its recovery from your procedure.  Leaving surgery, your hand, wrist, or forearm may be wrapped with a bulky dressing. Surgeons will frequently include a splint as a part of the dressing. It is a rigid part of the dressing that is intended to protect the surgical repair and add to comfort.  A splint typically covers only part of the surgical area, leaving some room for swelling.  Depending on what is needed for your particular surgery, your surgeon may recommend that you return to the office after a few days for a dressing change or a change to a full cast

A cast is applied by wrapping fiberglass tape or plaster around your hand, wrist, or arm. The cast hardens and forms a rigid hollow tube around your extremity. It holds the surgical area still during the healing process. It may need to be changed over time to account for swelling, wound care, suture removal, or to take x-rays.  Some surgeries require a brace during the healing process. 

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Arthritis Hand Hand Pain

Getting a Grip on Arthritis-Related Hand Pain

Man holding his hand – pain concept

from U.S. News & World Report

ESPECIALLY AS A PERSON ages, it’s common to experience pain in the hands that’s caused by arthritis. It’s most often the result of a loss of cartilage that can leave bone rubbing on bone, or what’s called osteoarthritis. Inflammatory arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis (resulting from the skin disease psoriasis) that leads to swollen fingers and toes can also be to blame.

While some are able to handle a mild degree of discomfort, arthritis in the hands is frequently more than a fleeting annoyance, and it can even lead to hand deformity if left untreated. As pain becomes more regular and severe, it can affect a person’s ability to do everything from activities they enjoy – like golf or other forms of recreation – to those things they need to do just to get through the day, from buttoning a shirt to gripping a cup of coffee in the morning.

Fortunately, there are ways you can ease arthritis-related hand pain. Read the full story.

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Hand Pain Hand Surgeon Numbness

Why Are My Hands Numb?

There can be many different causes for numb hands. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, which is a condition involving a pinched nerve in the wrist, is one of the most common reasons. Typically, with this condition, you’ll feel numbness or tingling in thumb, index, middle and ring fingers.

Here are five other reasons your hands may be numb:

  1. Compression Neuropathy: This means there is pressure on a nerve, which can happen from an injury or other medical condition. In addition to numbness, it can cause weak or twitchy muscles. The location of the compressed nerve can vary, resulting in a variety of different symptoms. Learn more.
  2. Peripheral Neuropathy: This condition can commonly occur in people with diabetes, alcoholics, older individuals or individuals who were poisoned from metals or industrial compounds. It typically causes constant numbness in a general area.
  3. Fibromyalgia: This is a disorder that causes pain all over the body. People with this condition can be more likely than others to develop Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, which in turn may cause numb hands.
  4. Myofascial Pain Syndrome: This condition can be similar to Fibromyalgia. While the symptoms of pain are typically in the neck and shoulder, it can also cause numb hands and forearms.
  5. Medications: Cancer treatment drugs are an example of medication that can cause numbness and tingling in the hands.
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