Monthly Archives: Sep 2020

Hand Hand Tumor Lumps and Bumps

4 Common Types of Hand Tumors

Hand tumors and wrist tumors can come in all shapes and sizes. Sometimes, it may just look like an ordinary lump or bump. And while it may technically be a tumor, the tumor is not necessarily cancerous. There are many different types of hand tumors, and most are benign, which means non-cancerous. Hand tumors can be something as common as a wart or a mole, which are on top of the skin, or something more uncommon that is beneath the skin. Here are some examples of common hand tumors:

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Therapy Nerves

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition of the upper extremity that is known as the most common nerve compression to occur in the body. It affects approximately 3% of the population and can cause many debilitating symptoms that affect a person’s daily life. In fact, because of its commonality and significance of symptoms, carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common causes of work time lost in the U.S., making this an important diagnosis to understand and be aware of. In an effort to build better awareness of this diagnosis, here are some commonly addressed questions regarding carpal tunnel syndrome:

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Hand Wrist Wrist Fracture

5 Signs of a Wrist Fracture

The wrist is a part of the body that is injured frequently, and these injuries may result in pain, a sprained wrist or even a wrist fracture. A wrist fracture is a medical term for a broken wrist, which means you’ve broken one or more of the many bones in your wrist. There are eight wrist bones which are connected to the forearm bones called the radius and the ulna. The radius is the most common bone to break in the wrist. This injury typically happens from falling on an outstretched hand, but it can also result from traumatic events such as a car accident.

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Cold Hand Disease Finger Raynaud's Raynaud's Phenomenon

What is Raynaud’s Disease?

Hand surgeon Ekkehard Bonatz, MD, PhD answers your questions about Raynaud’s disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon, and the difference between the two.

What is Raynaud’s?

Raynaud’s is known as Raynaud’s disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon and Raynaud’s syndrome. It is a medical condition in which the circulation to your fingertips is interrupted. The fingers, and sometimes toes, will turn pale and white as they have no blood supply. After a while they turn blue, and you may experience discomfort or pain. Eventually the blood flow to the fingers returns, making them appear red, and your fingers may burn. The problem then settles down, with return of normal circulation and feeling, and the burning disappears. The periods of discoloration may last from a few minutes to several hours.

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