Author Archives: The Hand Society

Heat Treatment Ice Treatment

Heat and Cold Treatment: When to Heat or Ice an Injury

Hand surgeon Amar A. Patel, MD answers your questions about heat treatment and cold treatment and which one to use for your injury.

Heat packs or cold packs? This is a question that doctors and therapists often get from patients.  Both heat treatments and cold treatments are inexpensive and extremely effective modalities that can help speed up recovery and function when used properly.

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Hand Hand Safety Knife Safety Pumpkin Carving

How to Carve a Pumpkin

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Biking Hand Pain Nerves Overuse

Advice from a Hand Therapist: Hand Pain from Biking

Biking is a great way to get outside and get some exercise. As with all activities, there is a risk for injury. Injuries have different causes such as trauma or overuse. The hand is no exception to overuse with an activity such as biking. The hand contains two nerves, the median and ulnar nerve, that control the ability to bend your fingers and wrist. Bikers who frequently ride, or ride for long durations, may develop numbness or tingling in their ring and small fingers. This may be due to pressure on the ulnar nerve at the base of the palm. This area is called Guyon’s canal.

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Hand Ligament Wrist Wrist Sprain

How to Know if You Have a Sprained Wrist


The wrist is often injured, and there are many different types of injuries you could sustain including a sprained wrist, wrist fracture, ligament tear, etc. Most often, a sprained wrist takes place because of a fall or sudden twisting motion of the wrist. It can sometimes be hard to tell how severe your wrist injury is because many of these injuries have similar symptoms. A sprained wrist means that you’ve either stretched or torn a ligament. Ligaments are what connect the many bones in your wrist.

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Congenital Finger Hand Syndactyly

What is Syndactyly?

Hand surgeon Reena Anjalie Bhatt, MD answers your questions about webbed fingers, also known as syndactyly.

What is syndactyly?

Syndactyly is a condition in which a child is born with two fused fingers or toes. This can occur in the hands or the feet or both. It can occur in one hand or foot, or all four. Syndactyly is the most common congenital malformation of the limbs.

Most commonly, the fused fingers or toes are joined by soft tissue, this is termed simple syndactyly. When adjacent finger bones are fused as well as the soft tissue, this is termed complex syndactyly. When fingers are fused all the way to the fingertips, this is termed complete, whereas fusion that occurs only partway across the webspace is termed incomplete. Syndactyly can occur as part of a syndrome. Complex syndactyly with bony fusion more commonly occurs with with a syndrome. Apert syndrome and Poland syndrome are two examples of syndromes with syndactyly association.

Syndactyly can occur sporadically or be inherited and occurs in 1 out of 2,000 births. In 15-40% of patients there is a family history.

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Hand Hand Tumor Lumps and Bumps

4 Common Types of Hand Tumors

Hand tumors and wrist tumors can come in all shapes and sizes. Sometimes, it may just look like an ordinary lump or bump. And while it may technically be a tumor, the tumor is not necessarily cancerous. There are many different types of hand tumors, and most are benign, which means non-cancerous. Hand tumors can be something as common as a wart or a mole, which are on top of the skin, or something more uncommon that is beneath the skin. Here are some examples of common hand tumors:

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Hand Wrist Wrist Fracture

5 Signs of a Wrist Fracture

The wrist is a part of the body that is injured frequently, and these injuries may result in pain, a sprained wrist or even a wrist fracture. A wrist fracture is a medical term for a broken wrist, which means you’ve broken one or more of the many bones in your wrist. There are eight wrist bones which are connected to the forearm bones called the radius and the ulna. The radius is the most common bone to break in the wrist. This injury typically happens from falling on an outstretched hand, but it can also result from traumatic events such as a car accident.

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Cold Hand Disease Finger Raynaud's Raynaud's Phenomenon

What is Raynaud’s Disease?

Hand surgeon Ekkehard Bonatz, MD, PhD answers your questions about Raynaud’s disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon, and the difference between the two.

What is Raynaud’s?

Raynaud’s is known as Raynaud’s disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon and Raynaud’s syndrome. It is a medical condition in which the circulation to your fingertips is interrupted. The fingers, and sometimes toes, will turn pale and white as they have no blood supply. After a while they turn blue, and you may experience discomfort or pain. Eventually the blood flow to the fingers returns, making them appear red, and your fingers may burn. The problem then settles down, with return of normal circulation and feeling, and the burning disappears. The periods of discoloration may last from a few minutes to several hours.

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