Author Archives: The Hand Society

Hand Hand Surgery Replantation

What is Replantation?

Replantation is a procedure during which a surgeon will reattach a finger, hand or arm that has been completely cut from a person’s body. Replantation, however, isn’t always an option. A surgeon will only perform this procedure if the limb is still expected to function without pain. Sometimes, the body part is too damaged to perform a replant.

This procedure takes a number of hours to complete. The steps include:

  • Step 1: Damaged tissue is carefully removed.
  • Step 2: Bone ends are shortened and rejoined with pins, wires, or plates and screws. This holds the part in place to allow the rest of the tissues to be restored.
  • Step 3: Muscles, tendons, arteries, nerves and veins are then repaired. Sometimes grafts or artificial spacers of bone, skin, tendons and blood vessels may be needed, too. The grafts can be from your own body or from a tissue bank.
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Hand Hand Pain Overuse

Smartphone-Related Hand Injuries and How to Reduce Them

from WRVO Public Media

Repeated use of anything can cause wear and tear including your smartphone. Continued scrolling and tapping can wear down the tendons in your hand and wrist causing injury. Repetitive use injuries are common in older adults but health professionals are seeing injury in younger patients as the age smartphone use decreases.

Dr. Daniel Polatsch, an orthopedic hand surgeon and co-director of the New York Hand and Wrist Center of Lenox Hill, joins us this week to discuss how extended use of smartphones can cause injury and how to reduce the risk of it.

Trigger finger and tendonitis are two of the more common injuries related to overusing your hands. This is usually common in people who spend long hours typing at the computer all day but Polatsch is seeing more patients come in with these injuries due to smartphone use.

“It can develop into something called a trigger finger or trigger thumb which is actually the proper name,” said Polatsch.

Read the full story.

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Hand Hand Safety Knife Safety Turkey Carving

Infographic: How to Carve a Turkey

In the United States, 88% of people eat turkey on Thanksgiving. That leaves a lot of room for hand injuries! It’s not uncommon to accidentally cut yourself while carving a turkey or other meats. Unfortunately, carving injuries can be serious, sometimes involving amputation. Here’s how you can safely carve a turkey this Thanksgiving:

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Giving Back Hand Surgery

Random Fact: Giving Back

Did you know? Studies have shown that giving to others actually increases our health. Learn about how you can help adults and children who need life-changing hand surgeries around the world by visiting www.TouchingHandsProject.org.

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Arthritis Finger Knuckles

A Hand Surgeon’s Advice About Knuckle Cracking

from Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

ASSH hand surgeon member Sanjeev Kakar, MD talks to Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute about knuckle cracking. Is it good for you? Does it make your knuckles big and swollen? Does it give you arthritis? Hear what he has to say in this new podcast.


Real deal or wives’ tale: Knuckle cracking can cause harm, including arthritis? In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, we hear from a hand surgeon and his answer may surprise you.

Listen to the podcast.

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Anatomy Finger Hand Joints

Anatomy 101: Finger Joints

Joints are cartilage surfaces that connect bones to each other. This cartilage allows our bones to glide smoothly against one another, allowing us painless movement. There are four joints in each finger, totaling 20 joints in each hand!

The small, ringer, middle and index fingers all have the same four joints:

  1. Distal Interphalangeal Joint (DIP): The DIP joint is located at the tip of the finger, just before the finger nail starts. Arthritis can develop at this joint, and it is also commonly fractured.
  2. Proximal Interphalangeal Joint (PIP): The PIP joint is the joint just below the DIP joint. It is located below the top two bones of the finger and allows the finger to bend and extend. This joint can become stiff easily after injury.
  3. Metacarpophalangeal Joint (MCP): The MP joint is where the hand bone meets the finger bone, referred to as the “knuckle.” These joints are very important, allowing us to bend/flex and spread our fingers.
  4. Carpometacarpal Joint (CMC Joint): The CMC joint is located at the bottom of the hand bone. This joint varies in each finger. For example, in the index finger, it has little motion. In the small finger, it has a lot of motion. Injuries and problems with this joint are uncommon.

The thumb joints are a little different than the other finger joints. To learn more about the thumb joints and more about the finger joints, visit our online Anatomy section.

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Hand Hand Safety Knife Safety Pumpkin Carving

How to Carve a Pumpkin

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Arthritis Hand Osteoarthritis

Ask a Doctor: Osteoarthritis

Hand surgeon Khurram Pervaiz, MD answers your questions about osteoarthritis.

My doctor told me I have osteoarthritis. What is that?

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis and involves wear and tear of the joint.  This form of arthritis is caused by inflammation, breakdown, and the eventual loss of cartilage in the joint – the cartilage wears down over time.

What causes osteoarthritis?

There are many reasons for osteoarthritis of a joint. The most common factors that lead to osteoarthritis are old age, genetics, weight and injury / trauma.

What are some of the symptoms of osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis affecting a joint can cause a variety of symptoms such as pain, stiffness (limited mobility), warmth, and swelling. There may be a grating feeling (or crepitus) with movement of the joint.

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