Author Archives: The Hand Society

"Tech Neck" Hand Pain Technology

The Right Way to Use Your Phone So You Don’t Wreck Your Body

from SELF

When you think of the impressive feats the human body has accomplished—building pyramids, running marathons, all that good stuff—hunching over a cell phone to scroll through Instagram likely isn’t one of them.

It’s not that there’s anything wrong with loving your phone. We live in a digital age, after all. But there might be something wrong with the way you use it. It might sound weird, but without proper form, prolonged cell phone use can cause a slew of issues from a painful neck to dry eyes and more. Fortunately, you don’t need to give up your phone entirely to help keep these problems at bay. Small changes can make all the difference.

Here, a look at a few common phone-related issues doctors see, plus how to prevent each one.

Read the full story on SELF.

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Hand Conditions Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

3 Facts About Hand Surgeons

The hand is extremely unique, and it takes a special type of surgeon to treat it. You may be surprised to learn these three things about hand surgeons:

  1. Hand surgeons treat everything from general hand pain to hand emergencies. Just because you don’t need hand surgery doesn’t mean you shouldn’t see a hand surgeon! Hand surgeons are specialists for all things related to the hand and can treat a variety of conditions including carpal tunnel, trigger finger, sports injuries, jammed fingers, broken hands/fingers, birth defects, etc. Hand surgeons can also potentially reattach your hand or finger if it is severed in a traumatic incident.
  2. Hand surgeons don’t just treat hands. Most hand surgeons treat the wrist and arm as well. Many can also treat the elbow and shoulder.
  3. Hand surgeons receive additional, specialized training. This extra training is a full year on top of their residency.
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Burns Hand Pain Skin

Random Fact: Burns

Hand burn

Did you know? If you have blisters after burning yourself, you may have a second degree burn, which requires a hand/forearm splint. Find out the signs of first, second, third and fourth degree burns and how they should be treated.

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Avocado Hand Hand Safety Knife Safety

The dangers of avocado: how to safely slice this summer

from the Daily Herald

As the temperatures rise and minds wander to poolside guacamole and fresh avocado toast, it’s important to be aware of the trending condition sending many avo-lovers to the hospital — avocado hand.

Dr. Leon Benson, a hand surgeon at NorthShore University HealthSystem and Illinois Bone & Joint Institute, has treated a number of patients for serious injuries sustained while cutting and removing the pit of an avocado; including torn tendons and hands that have been impaled by sharp knives.

If you’re an avo-lover, take warning. Even celebrities like Joy Behar and Meryl Streep have fallen victim to avocado hand. It’s important to know how to properly hold and cut an avocado so you don’t get injured by this supermarket booby trap. Below, Dr. Benson outlines his top tips for how to safely slice avocados.

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Hand Hand Surgery Opioids Pain

6 Ways to Reduce Pain Without Opioids

After surgery, you may be feeling pain. While your doctor may have prescribed medication to lessen the pain, there are many other things you can do to make yourself more comfortable post-surgery. Here are six ways to reduce pain without opioids:

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Anatomy Extensor Tendons Hand Tendons

Anatomy 101: The Extensor Tendon

Tendons are cord-like extensions that connect muscles to bones. Extensor tendons are thin tendons located on the back of the hand, just under the skin. These particular tendons allow you to straighten your fingers and thumb and can be injured by a simple cut or jammed finger. These injuries can cause the tendons to rip from their attachment to the bone, making it hard to straighten your fingers or thumb as you usually do.

Here are two common conditions that result from an injured extensor tendon:

  1. Mallet Fingers are common in baseball players and are typically caused when a ball hits the tip of the finger or thumb. It causes the finger or thumb to droop at the tip.
  2. Boutonnière Deformities are when the middle part of the finger is bent downward.
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Hand Hand Surgeon Tendon Injuries Tendons

Ask a Doctor: Tendon Injuries

Hand surgeon David J. Bozentka, MD answers your questions about tendon injuries.

What is a tendon?

A tendon is a cord-like structure that attaches a muscle to a bone.  The muscles that allow you to bend and straighten your fingers start in the forearm, and the tendons attach the muscles to your fingers and wrist.  The tendons on the palm side of the hand that bend the fingers and wrist are called flexor tendons.  The tendons on the back side of the hand and wrist are termed extensor tendons.

How do I know that I have a tendon injury?  

Difficulty in fully bending or straightening your finger or wrist after an injury may be related to damage to a tendon.  Lacerations (cuts) to the hand, wrist or forearm are some of the more common reasons you can injure a tendon.  In addition, an injury without an open wound can cause a tendon to pull away from a bone called an avulsion injury.  A Jersey Finger is a term used for a flexor tendon avulsion injury most commonly occurring in the ring finger.  A player that grabs another player’s jersey that is pulled away can avulse a flexor tendon, causing inability to bend the tip joint of the finger.  Alternatively, a Mallet Finger involves an avulsion injury of the extensor tendon leading to a droop of the tip joint of the involved digit.

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Elbow Hand Hand Pain Hand Surgeon Wrist

Pain in Your Hand, Wrist or Elbow? When to Seek Help

from the Cleveland Clinic

Pain is your body’s way of telling you something is wrong. But it doesn’t always tell you if you need medical treatment. So when pain develops in your hand, wrist or elbow, how do you know whether to treat it at home or see a doctor?

Orthopedic surgeon William Seitz, Jr., MD, who specializes in upper extremity problems, says if something is seriously wrong, you’ll know it.

A wrist fracture, for instance, will cause pain you can’t ignore. “When the pain is so bad you can’t move past it, call your doctor or head to the emergency department,” he says. If you don’t have that level of pain, then listen to your body. Take a moment to consider why you might be feeling pain and what it can tell you.

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