Author Archives: The Hand Society

Hand Wrist Wrist Fracture

5 Signs of a Wrist Fracture

The wrist is a part of the body that is injured frequently, and these injuries may result in pain, a sprained wrist or even a wrist fracture. A wrist fracture is a medical term for a broken wrist, which means you’ve broken one or more of the many bones in your wrist. There are eight wrist bones which are connected to the forearm bones called the radius and the ulna. The radius is the most common bone to break in the wrist. This injury typically happens from falling on an outstretched hand, but it can also result from traumatic events such as a car accident.

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Cold Hand Disease Finger Raynaud's Raynaud's Phenomenon

What is Raynaud’s Disease?

Hand surgeon Ekkehard Bonatz, MD, PhD answers your questions about Raynaud’s disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon, and the difference between the two.

What is Raynaud’s?

Raynaud’s is known as Raynaud’s disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon and Raynaud’s syndrome. It is a medical condition in which the circulation to your fingertips is interrupted. The fingers, and sometimes toes, will turn pale and white as they have no blood supply. After a while they turn blue, and you may experience discomfort or pain. Eventually the blood flow to the fingers returns, making them appear red, and your fingers may burn. The problem then settles down, with return of normal circulation and feeling, and the burning disappears. The periods of discoloration may last from a few minutes to several hours.

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Finger Joints Knuckles

Is Knuckle Cracking Safe?

Hand surgeon Omar Nazir, MD answers your questions about knuckle cracking.

Crack!  Pop!  Snap!  We are all familiar with the unique sounds that come from our joints.  While knuckle cracking causes some to breathe a side of relief, other cringe at the sound.

What causes the “cracking” sound?

Numerous theories have been proposed as to the cause of these sounds.  Over the past hundred years ideas ranging from the realignment of tendons, small bands within the joints (plicas) and sudden tightening of the joint capsule have all been proposed.

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Elbow Elbow Fracture Hand

6 Signs of an Elbow Fracture

A young woman touching her painful elbow

Our elbows are vital to some of the daily tasks we perform, including things like washing your face, picking up objects, or anything that requires you to turn your palm up or down. Each year, many people suffer from an elbow fracture, which is another term for a broken elbow. Elbow fractures can result from a fall, a direct blow to the elbow, or an abnormal twisting of the arm. Here are 6 signs that you may have an elbow fracture:

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Hand Wrist Wrist Pain

7 causes of ulnar-sided wrist pain

wrist pain

Your wrist is extremely important to almost everything you do with your hands, including lifting objects, exercising, preparing food, etc. The ulnar side of your wrist is the side of your “pinkie” finger (or small finger), and pain on this side can be very common. It’s so common, in fact, that it can sometimes be difficult to determine the exact cause. The anatomy of the wrist is extremely complicated, which means that ulnar-sided wrist pain can result from an injury to bones, cartilage, ligaments or tendons.

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Fireworks Hand Safety Hand Surgeon

5 Fireworks Tips from a Hand Surgeon

Fireworks are a fascinating and fun part of holiday celebrations throughout the country. Unfortunately, this popular tradition is also associated with injuries that are all too common among both adults and children. Each year, it is estimated that over 10,000 fireworks-related injuries occur in the United States and at least 40% of these injuries involve the arm, hand, and fingers.

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Ligament Wrist Pain Wrist Sprain

Do I Have a Torn Ligament?

A torn ligament can happen in conjunction with a sprained wrist, typically when the wrist is bent backwards forcefully or put into an awkward position. This can happen during any sport such as gymnastics, soccer, football, etc. or simply during a fall. Ligaments are bands of tough connective tissue that connect two bones or hold together a joint. The most common ligament to be injured during a wrist sprain is the scapholunate ligament, which holds together the scaphoid and lunate bones.

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Amputation Hand Surgery Hand Therapy Prosthetics

Recovering From a Hand, Finger or Arm Amputation

The definition of an amputation is “the action of surgically cutting off a limb,” however, an amputation can also happen by accident. Many times, an amputation of the hand, finger or arm is the result of a tragic accident, but amputations can also be planned surgeries to prevent the spread of a disease. Sometimes, fingers that were amputated in an accident can be reattached by a hand surgeon, but this isn’t always possible.

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