Author Archives: The Hand Society

Hand Hand Therapy Shoulder

7 stretches for a frozen shoulder

Check out the Hand Society’s latest re-tweet from Harvard Health about getting rid of a frozen shoulder. Learn more about shoulder pain at www.handcare.org.

 

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Burns Golf Hand Jammed Finger Lawnmower Wrist Wrist Sprain

5 common summer injuries and how to prevent them

fitness, people and healthy lifestyle concept - happy young female runner jogging outdoors

We all love the warm summer weather and the fun activities that come with it, but the summer season is a peak time for many injuries. Here are some common summer injuries and how to prevent them:

  1. Wrist sprains: Falls are extremely common during the summer. Many activities such as skateboarding, rollerblading, bike riding or riding a scooter can result in a wrist sprain. To protect your wrists, wear wrist guards during these activities.
  2. Lawnmower injuries: Each year, 25% of hand and foot lawnmower injuries result in amputation. Keep children away from the lawnmower and always keep hands and feet away from the blades. For more information, read these safety tips.
  3. Burns: Barbecuing and relaxing around a fire pit during the summer is always enjoyable, but the open flames can be dangerous. Keep your distance from the grill and/or fire pit and always keep an eye on children that are nearby. Always use long tongs when grilling to protect your hands.
  4. Golfing injuries: Golfing can be tough on your hands, arms and wrists. Warming up and stretching before playing is important for injury prevention.
  5. Jammed finger: Many sports become more active in the summer, and jammed fingers are some of the most common sports injuries. Learn more about how to treat a jammed finger.
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Hand Hand Therapy Scar Treatment

How to treat a scar

Scar Stages (4)

 

Scars are normal after an injury or surgery.  It is how the body heals. Your hand surgeon or hand therapist may recommend a variety of scar treatments after your injury is healed, cut is healed, or stitches are removed. Here are some treatments that may help the look and feel of your scar:

  • Massage: Gently massaging your scar can help reduce sensitivity and make it more smooth and movable.
  • Rubbing with textures: Exposing your scar to different textures can also help reduce its sensitivity, making it more used to the normal forces of daily life. Desensitizing a scar can take up to four months. You should begin as soon as you are done healing.
  • Exercise: An early exercise program can prevent stiffness of the joints near your scar.
  • Silicone gel: This gel can be placed on your scar in the form of gel or sheets, often at night. Wrapping the scar can reduce swelling and tension.
  • Injections or surgery: For special scar problems such as burns, an injection or surgery may be recommended by your surgeon.

Some scars take up to a year to complete the healing process, which is complete when the scar is light in color, smooth, and no longer sensitive to touch. During the healing process, be sure to protect your scar from the sun. Learn more about scar treatment at www.handcare.org.

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Finger Fracture Hand Pediatrics Wrist

Random Fact: Playground Injuries

Happy friends having fun on playground

Each year, more than 200,000 children visit the emergency room from an injury on the playground. Learn more about finger, wrist and hand fractures in children, common playground injuries.

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Fireworks Hand Hand Safety

12 fireworks safety tips

Fireworks FINAL

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Elbow Hand Lateral Epicondylitis Tendons Tennis Elbow

Ask a Doctor: Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. Noah Raizman answers your questions about Lateral Epicondylitis, sometimes known as tennis elbow.

Q: What is Lateral Epicondylitis, and is it the same thing as “Tennis Elbow?”
A: Lateral Epicondylitis and Tennis Elbow are one and the same. Lateral Epicondylitis is a painful condition caused by damage to the elbow where the tendons that extend your wrist and fingers originate from. That area is called the lateral epicondyle. Tendons attach muscle to bone. The primary muscle that allows your wrist to extend, the ECRB (extensor carpi radialis brevis), is usually the tendon involved.

Q: What causes it?
A: Lateral Epicondylitis can be caused by trauma, repetitive mild trauma and overuse, but truly, we are not sure why some people get it and others do not. We consider it a “tendinopathy of middle age” because it typically happens in patients in their 40s and 50s, though it can occur at any age. Sometimes it is due to sports activities like golf or racquet sports and sometimes from work activities, but, just as often, it seems to happen after lifting or carrying objects.

Q: What are the symptoms?
A: Lateral Epicondylitis typically includes symptoms such as pain over the outside (lateral) part of the elbow. There is typically no clicking, popping or feeling of instability. There typically is no pain over the back or inside of the elbow. The pain is worst with gripping, grasping and wringing activities and can be provoked by typing or using a computer mouse with the wrist extended. There is not usually any numbness or tingling associated with it.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Nerves Wrist

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Check out this latest video from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand that explains the causes, symptoms and treatment options for carpal tunnel syndrome.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused by swelling in the carpal tunnel, which puts pressure on the nerve.  This pressure can happen due to joint dislocations, fractures, arthritis, and many other causes. Symptoms can include pain, numbness, tingling, a weak grip and clumsiness. Learn more about carpal tunnel syndrome at www.handcare.org.

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Anatomy Fracture Hand Wrist

Anatomy 101: Wrist Bones

Bones-Wrist-Scaphoid

The wrist bones and hand bones give you the support and flexibility needed to move your hand in all different ways and control objects of all shapes and sizes. There are eight bones in the wrist:

  1. Scaphoid
  2. Lunate
  3. Triquetrum
  4. Trapezoid
  5. Trapezium
  6. Capitate
  7. Hamate

The scaphoid bone is the most commonly injured wrist bone, typically resulting in a scaphoid fracture.

Learn more about the bones of the wrist with the interactive anatomy tool from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.

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