Author Archives: The Hand Society

Elbow Hand Joints Shoulder Wrist

How to protect your wrists, elbows and shoulders during yoga

Group of three young women practicing the side plank pose during yoga class in a gym

from Huffpost Healthy Living

Some of the most common injuries in yoga are muscle or joint problems, though most problems are mild. Yoga can even be a safe and helpful form of exercise for people with joint issues like rheumatoid arthritis, as long as you know how to modify postures with the help of your yoga teacher.

Here are seven tips to help keep your joints healthy and safe in yoga:

1. Protect your wrists: Spread your hands wide and evenly when your hands bear weight, such as in Downward Facing Dog Pose.

Beginners in yoga often tent their hands in Downward Facing Dog Pose, but this actually makes it more difficult on your hands and wrists. Make sure that your hands are spread wide and ground all corners of your palm on your mat. Your hands should be pressed down firmly enough that someone would not be able to pluck your fingers off the mat.

Dr. David Wei of Orthopaedic & Neurosurgery Specialists in Greenwich, CT, an orthopedic hand surgeon who specializes in injuries of the hand, wrist, and elbow, explains:

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Anatomy Hand Thumb

The Value of the Thumb

from Medical Daily

Whether we’re doing fingerprints or we’re battling in a “thumb war,” we often take one of, if not the most valuable digit for granted. The thumb allows us to grasp objects, hitch a ride, and text message. But how powerful and versatile is our thumb?

 

In the BBC Series “Dissected,” hand surgeon Donald Sammut demonstrates to presenter Dr. George McGavin what gives the thumb its unique abilities by dissecting the human hand. “The general arrangement of the human hand has two hills and a valley in the middle, and these two hills consist of muscle, and they serve the little finger and the thumb,” Sammut says in the video.

Sammut strips away the tissues that protect the vital structures of the palm to look at the thumb. It’s surrounded by fat, which covers all of the important structures that pass through, such as major arteries, nerves, and flexor tendons — tissues that help control movement in your hand. The thumb has no fewer than nine muscles that are solely dedicated to controlling it, contributing to the precision of this intricate muscle system.


Learn more about anatomy of the hand at www.HandCare.org.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

5 Pumpkin Carving Safety Tips

Pumpkin Carving Tips FINAL

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Hand Thumb Thumb Arthritis Thumb Pain

Thumb Arthritis: Symptoms, Treatment and Recovery

 

Thumb arthritis, sometimes known as “basal joint arthritis” or “arthritis base of the thumb,” is a condition that is genetic and tends to come with age. Patients with thumb arthritis find it difficult to perform daily tasks such as opening a jar or turning a doorknob. The pain and swelling is found at the base of the thumb.

Watch this two-minute video to see how a quick surgery can relieve thumb arthritis symptoms if splints and injections do not work for you.

Learn more about Thumb Arthritis and watch more short videos at www.HandCare.org.

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Anatomy Elbow Hand

Anatomy 101: Elbow Tendons

Tendons-Elbow-Brachioradialis

 

The elbow is where your forearm and upper arm join together. Elbow tendons help connect muscles and bones, allowing your arm to bend and straighten. Here are some specifics:

  • Biceps brachii tendons: Connect the muscle in the upper arm to the bones near the front shoulder and to the radius bone at the elbow. These tendons help bend (flex) the elbow and rotate the forearm.
  • Tricep brachii tendons: Connect the muscle in the upper arm to the bones near the shoulder and to the ulna bone at the back of the elbow. These tendons help straighten (extend) the elbow.
  • Brachialis tendon: Connects the muscle in the upper arm to the ulna bone of the forearm near the elbow. This tendon helps bend (flex) the elbow.
  • Brachioradialis tendons: Connect the muscle in the forearm to the humerus bone in the upper arm and the radius bone in the forearm near the wrist. These tendons help bend (flex) the elbow.
  • Supinator tendons: Connect the muscle in the forearm to the humerus bone in the upper arm and the radius bone in the forearm near the elbow. These tendons allow the muscle to rotate the forearm.

View full-detail illustrations on the interactive anatomy page at www.HandCare.org for more information.

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Finger Hand Thumb Trigger Finger

Ask a Doctor: Trigger Finger

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. Sameer Puri answers your most important questions about stenosing tenosynovitis, also known as trigger finger.

My doctor told me I might have a “trigger finger.” What is that?

“Trigger finger,” or stenosing tenosynovitis, is a condition that causes pain, locking, popping or clicking of the fingers or thumb when the hand is opened or closed.

What causes trigger finger?

Muscles in your forearm attach to tendons that run all the way to the bones at the ends of your fingers. These muscles help you bend your fingers into a fist. In the hand, the tendons are held close to the bone by pulleys. If the pulleys become too tight or thick, or the tendon gets swollen, the tendon can get stuck. If the tendon cannot glide freely, trigger finger occurs.

What are some of the symptoms of trigger finger?

In its early stages, trigger finger can cause pain. Usually, it is tender on your palm where the finger joins the hand. Sometimes, you feel the pain further along or even on the back of the finger. You might feel like your hands or fingers are stiff or swollen. As it progresses, the tightness can cause the tendon to catch as it tries to glide, leading to a painful snapping sensation when making a fist or opening the hand. Eventually, the finger can get stuck where it is, making it really hard either to straighten or to bend it.

The symptoms are often worst in the mornings immediately after waking up and can occur in any of the fingers or thumbs.

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Arm Hand Prosthetics

A day in the life of Bowen Toomey, the boy with no arms or legs adopted by a U.S. family

Bowen Toomey was adopted 5 years ago by hand surgeon Jeremy Toomey, MD and his wife Devon Toomey. People followed up with the family in their latest issue.

from People.com

The infant had no arms and no legs, but there was a brightness in his deep brown eyes that took Devon Toomey’s breath away. She couldn’t stop staring at the photo on Reese’s Rainbow special-needs adoption website. She just knew, without question, that the boy was meant to be her son.

“I couldn’t pull my eyes away – there was something special about him,” Devon, 40, tells PEOPLE, relaxing at the sunny kitchen table in her Eagle, Idaho, home as her three boys wrestle and laugh on the carpet nearby. “I’d always felt that when the time was right, a child in need would find us. And here he was, waiting for us, thousands of miles away.”

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Elbow Golf Hand Shoulder Wrist

How to prevent golf injuries

Golf Injuries v1

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