Category : Arthritis

Arthritis Food Hand

Can salt cause arthritis?

food, junk-food, cooking and unhealthy eating concept - close up of white salt cellar on wooden table

from The Paper

There’s a salt epidemic going on – according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the average American ingests up to double the recommended sodium intake every day. Not only is this bad news for those with high blood pressure, diabetes or kidney disease, but one local bone expert points out that too much salt can also exacerbate the most common hand issue Americans face: arthritis.

Currently, approximately twenty percent of the U.S. population suffers from arthritis – that’s more than 52 million people. Dr. Mark Ciaglia, the preeminent hand surgeon and owner of Woodlands Center for Special Surgery, has noted a trend in arthritis hitting younger age groups, thanks in large part to repetitive motion injuries caused by activities such as video gaming or intense school-level sports.

“People, depending on their health, should take in between 1500 to 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day; yet the average person eats about 3,400,” said Ciaglia. He points out a couple of reasons why this can lead to arthritis and other hand issues.

Read the full story.

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Arthritis Hand Joints

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Protecting Your Joints

Closeup on young housewife opening jar of pickled cucumbers

May is National Arthritis Awareness Month! What better time to revisit and elaborate on a topic we started back in August 2015: Living with(out) thumb pain. In that post, we briefly discussed something called “joint protection,” and specifically discussed ways to protect your thumb and fingers when opening jars. For this edition, we’ll answer a few more questions and offer a few more tips.

The joints in my fingers are achy and feel swollen and stiff. I especially notice this after I’ve been working in the yard or doing household chores like vacuuming. My doctor says it is osteoarthritis. Is there anything I can do to make them feel better?

If your doctor has said you have osteoarthritis, you should consider this an early warning alarm.  You have a degenerative process happening within the joints. You need to do something to keep that from getting worse. This is where joint protection comes into play.

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Arthritis Hand Wrist

5 causes of wrist pain

Closeup on business woman with wrist pain

Hand surgeon Avery Arora, MD talks about common causes of wrist pain.

Even though the wrist is a relatively small part of the body, it has eight bones, as well as ligaments, tendons and tissue. The wrist also happens to be easy to damage, which could cause not only pain but also limited use of the wrist and hand. A wide range of things can affect the wrist.

1. Repetitive Motion

One of the most common reasons that people develop pain in their wrists is due to repetitive motion. Motions that cause your hands to do the same things, even simply staying in the same position for a long period can have terrible effects on the wrist. Driving for too long, typing and more can cause irritation in the joints, as well as stress fractures in some cases. This can lead to chronic pain for many patients.

2. Physical Impacts

Physical impacts, such as falling on your wrist or having something hit your wrist is a cause of injury and pain as well. An impact can cause a fracture, as well as a strain or a sprain. Even if the impact does not break a bone, it can harm the nerves, and cause tissue damage and swelling.

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Arthritis Hand Thumb Thumb Arthritis

Ask a Doctor: Thumb Arthritis

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. Tamara Clancy answers your questions about thumb arthritis, also known as arthritis base of the thumb.

What is the painful bump at the base of my thumb?

This is more than likely wear-and-tear arthritis, and the bump is one of the bones (metacarpal) that becomes prominent as the joint wears out (cartilage thins).

What is the cause?

The cause is the cartilage in the joint thinning out.  Some of this is genetic (inherited).  Injury and joint laxity (being “double-jointed”) may contribute to developing this as well.  It is also more common in women.

Is there any way to know if my pain will get worse?

No — this is a problem that usually gets worse as we get older, but there is no way to predict how rapidly the pain will progress in a particular person.

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Arthritis Hand Hand Safety Hand Surgeon

Advice from a doctor on avoiding hand injuries during the holidays

cooking and home concept - close up of male hand cutting tomato on cutting board with sharp knife

from the Sun Sentinel

Longtime West Boca Medical Center and private practice hand surgeon Dr. Michael Joyner sees his share of holiday mishaps – cutting holiday appetizers or prepping dinner with arthritis or using too sharp a knife – and has sage advice on how to ward off hand injuries.

What has arthritis got to do with food preparation?

They don’t have a good hold or grip. A lot of times, they’ll get a cut or laceration. In the hand, it doesn’t bleed so much, but may a hit a nerve. Many times they’ll have a constant numbness or tingling.

Does it get worse?

The longer you wait, the less likely it will be repaired.

What should people do if this happens to them?

I would follow up with a hand surgeon and be evaluated in a timely fashion. That can make a difference in your treatment plan.

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Arthritis Hand Hand Therapy Paraffin Wax

9 steps to treating your hands with paraffin wax

Spa salon. Manicure. Paraffin hand bath. Studio photo set.

Paraffin wax can provide relief from arthritis pain, sore joints or sore muscles. It is a type of wax that is used for candles and can be used in your own home. A paraffin wax unit can be purchased for a low cost or even rented. Learn how to safely use one of these units for your hands by following these 9 steps:

1. Wash your hands with soap and water and dry them.

2. Rub lotion onto your hands: Hand lotion allows the wax to be removed easily after treatment.

3. Dip your hand into the wax (Figure 1 above): Your fingertips should go in first. Keep your fingers separated and submerse your hand all the way past the wrist if desired.

4. Remove your hand after it has been coated with wax.

5. Repeat steps 3 and 4: Dip your hand 6-8 times, waiting a few seconds between each dip. This allows layers of wax to form over your hand.

6. Immediately cover your hand with a plastic bag and wrap with a hand towel (Figure 2 below): Wait 10-15 minutes. This will create moist, deep heat for your hand.

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Arthritis Hand MP Joint Arthritis Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Thumb Arthritis

Random Fact: Arthritis

Doctor's hand holding a wrinkled elderly hand

Arthritis impacts 53 million adults and 300,000 children. Learn about the different types that may affect your hands, including  osteoarthritis, arthritis base of the thumb, MP joint arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

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Arthritis Hand Joints Wrist

6 types of arthritis

Closeup on business woman with wrist pain

 

Arthritis is a common hand condition that can affect anyone. Learn about the different types of arthritis below.

  1. MP Joint Arthritis: This type of arthritis is a result of loss of cartilage at a joint, which can result from regular wear and tear, an injury or a medical condition. With MP Joint Arthritis, a common symptom is a shift in the fingers toward the pinky side. Other symptoms include pain, loss of motion, swelling and swollen-looking joints. Learn more.
  2. Osteoarthritis: This arthritis is a degenerative joint disease that also involves loss of cartilage at the joints. It may cause bony nodules at the middle joint of the finger or at the end of the finger, as well as swelling, aching and bumps. It may be more difficult to open a jar or turn a key. Learn more.
  3. Psoriatic Arthritis: Psoriasis is a skin disease in which patients have dry, red and scaly skin rashes on the body.  Some patients may develop psoriatic arthritis as a result. Symptoms may include swollen fingers, fingernail deformities, deformity at the end of the finger, and skin rashes. Learn more.
  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis: This condition is most common in the wrist and knuckles and typically occurs in both hands. Symptoms may include a soft lump on the back of the hand, a bent middle finger, firm nodules along the fingers or elbow, and the inability to straighten or bend a finger. You may feel numbness or tingling in your hand due to the swelling of the tendons. Learn more.
  5. Shoulder Arthritis: The likelihood of shoulder arthritis increases with age. It is most common in people over the age of 50; however, younger people can get it after suffering from a fracture or dislocation. The most common symptom of this condition is pain, which worsens with activity. Loss of motion is also a symptom of shoulder arthritis. Learn more.
  6. Thumb Arthritis: This type of arthritis comes with age. You may feel pain and weakness with pinching and grasping. Opening jars, turning doorknobs or keys, and writing are often painful activities. Learn more.

Visit www.handcare.org to browse articles, images and videos related to arthritis.

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