Category : Bones

Anatomy Bones Joints Wrist

Anatomy 101: Wrist Joints

The wrist joints lie between the many different bones in the wrist and forearm. Many wrist injuries (such as fractures, also known as a broken bone) involve the joint surface. There are three joints in the wrist:

  1. Radiocarpal joint: This joint is where the radius, one of the forearm bones, joins with the first row of wrist bones (scaphoid, lunate, and triquetrum).
  2. Ulnocarpal joint: This joint is where the ulna, one of the forearm bones, joins with the lunate and triquetrum wrist bones. This joint is commonly injured when you sprain your wrist. Some people are born with (or develop) an ulna that is longer than the radius, which can cause stress and pain on the joint, known as ulnocarpal abutment (impaction) syndrome.
  3. Distal radioulnar joint: This joint is where the two forearm bones connect. Pain with this joint can sometimes be a challenging problem to treat.

Learn more about the joints of the wrist and also the bones of the wrist in our Anatomy section. You can also visit www.HandCare.org for information on conditions and injuries of the hand, wrist, arm and shoulder.

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Bones Casts and Splints Hand

How to Take Care of a Cast

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Bones Broken Arm Elbow Fracture Fracture Hand Fracture Shoulder Fracture

Random Fact: Broken Bone

Close-up of a young woman's hand in plaster.

Did you know? Just because you can move a body part doesn’t mean a bone isn’t broken. Learn more about the signs of a broken bone in the hand, arm, elbow and shoulder.

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Bones Dislocated Elbow Elbow Hand

Taking care of a dislocated elbow

a man holds his painful, aching elbow ** Note: Shallow depth of field

Guest post by Avery Arora, MD

When the bones in the forearm are moved out of place with the bones in the upper part of the arm, the result is usually a dislocated elbow. All of the bones in the arm meet at the elbow joint, and dislocating the joint is a very serious injury.

What causes a dislocated elbow?

The dislocation of an elbow generally stems from some type of traumatic force that causes the bones to push apart from one another. This can happen during many types of sports, as well as in auto accidents. It can also occur when someone falls onto his or her outstretched arms and tries to stop the fall.

What are the signs and symptoms?

Those who have dislocated their elbow will generally experience an enormous amount of pain when the injury occurs. They will no longer be able to continue with whatever activity they were doing, as the pain will be too bad and they will have limited movement. The greatest amount of pain is generally felt at the elbow, but pain can also be in the rest of the arm, the hand, and the fingers.

It’s often possible to feel the elbow “pop” out of place when the injury occurs. The area around the elbow will also begin to swell. In the most serious cases, it can cause damage to the blood vessels, which will result in a loss of pulse in the arm. This is very serious and requires immediate medical care.

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Anatomy Arm Bones

Anatomy 101: Arm Bones

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While the hand is made up of many small bones, the arm consists of three large bones. The arm bones are:

  1. Humerus: This bone runs from the shoulder to the elbow.
  2. Radius: This is one of two bones in the forearm. It is on the thumb side of the forearm (radial side). This bone spins around the ulna when you move your palm up and down.
  3. Ulna: This is the other bone in the forearm. It is on the pinkie side (ulnar side) of the forearm. This bone does not spin.

Learn more about other bones of the upper extremity, including shoulder bones and hand bones in the anatomy section at www.HandCare.org. Here you can also learn about broken bones (i.e. how to know when your arm is broken and how it can be treated) and search for a hand surgeon to treat your injury.

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Arm Bones Broken Arm Fracture

How to know if you have a broken arm

Close-up of a young woman's hand in plaster.

It can sometimes be hard to tell the difference between a broken bone, also known as a fracture, and simply a sprain or other injury. Here are six signs that may mean you have a broken arm:

  1. Arm looks crooked
  2. Bruising
  3. Pain
  4. Swelling
  5. Arm is difficult to move
  6. Arm feels numb or tingly

Visit a hand surgeon if any of these symptoms are true. Any deep cuts that may have occurred during your injury should also be checked immediately since there is a risk of infection. Your hand surgeon or emergency doctor may treat you with a cast or recommend surgery.

Read more about broken arm injuries at www.HandCare.org.

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Anatomy Bones Finger Hand

Anatomy 101: Finger Bones

Bones-Metacarpals_Index

Did you know that there are 27 bones in the hand and wrist? The hand is a very complex anatomical structure. Fingers, also known as phalanges, have three bones each. The finger bones, as shown in the figure above, are:

  1. Proximal phalanges: Above the metacarpals, below the knuckle
  2. Middle phalanges: Just above the knuckle
  3. Distal phalanges: At the fingertip

The thumb mimics the other fingers but does not have a middle phalanx. Metacarpals are hand bones that line up with the fingers. They give the hand its structure and serve as an attachment for many small muscles, tendons and ligaments in the hand.

Learn more about the bones of the fingers, hand and wrist on the anatomy page at www.HandCare.org.

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