Category : Bones

Bones Fracture Hand Pediatrics

How to Know if Your Child Has a Broken Bone

It can be difficult to know if your child has a broken bone (also called a “fracture”), if they need emergency care or if they simply need at-home care. To complicate matters further, children need special care when they do break a bone because their bones are still growing and have a different consistency and quality than adult bones.

Children can break bones in a number of ways due to their constant activity and curiosity. They can fall, crush a finger in a door, touch dangerous machinery that they shouldn’t, get hit by a ball, etc.

Here are some important things to note if your child has an injury:

  • Bring your child to the emergency room if the finger, wrist, or arm is not in normal alignment or if there is a skin wound leading to the fracture.
  • Ice the injury if the injured body part looks normal and is movable, but keep an eye on your child’s symptoms.
  • If there is significant bruising or swelling, bring your child to see a hand surgeon as soon as possible. The finger, wrist or arm may be broken, but an x-ray is the only way to tell.
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Bones Fracture Hand Hand Therapy Radial Head Fracture

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Radial Head Fractures

The ability to move our elbows is required for using our arms during daily activities. We would not be able to reach our face to eat or our feet to put on shoes without our elbows.

Three bones make up the elbow: the long bone closer to your shoulder is the humerus, and the two forearm bones are the radius and ulna.  See the image above to get an idea of the location of these bones.

The radius and ulna are involved in bending and straightening the elbow as well as turning the palm up and down.  Radial head fractures affect all of these motions, especially the ability to rotate the forearm and hand.

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Bones Broken Hand Hand Hand Therapy

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: How Do Broken Bones Heal?

 

Have you ever wondered how a broken bone heals? Broken bones, also called fractures, can heal two different ways.  The two types of bone healing are primary and secondary bone healing.  Secondary bone healing is more common than primary bone healing.

Secondary bone healing occurs when there is slight, controlled motion between the two ends of broken bone during the healing time.   For example, slight motion occurs when the broken bone is set in a cast.  Once the broken bone has been aligned back to its normal position and is placed in a cast, proper healing can begin.

In addition, secondary bone healing progresses through different stages.  The first stage occurs immediately after the fracture.  In this stage, there is swelling and bleeding around the broken bone.  The bleeding then becomes a mass around the break.  This mass is first known as a soft callus and eventually becomes a hard callus.  Once the soft callus becomes hard, the bone is stable.  After a cast is removed, the hard callus is gradually remodeled to normal bone.  This can take up to several years.

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Bones Elbow Olecranon Bursitis

How to Know if You Have Olecranon Bursitis

Olecranon bursitis is a condition in which painful swelling develops at the back of the elbow. Here are signs that you may have this condition:

  • Swollen elbow (sometimes looking like a golf ball at the tip)
  • Tenderness
  • Redness
  • Warmth around the elbow
  • Fever
  • Draining pus

Most times, you feel no pain with olecranon bursitis. The swelling can either be gradual or happen at once. Sometimes, it can be painful if the bursa is infected.

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Bones Broken Hand Hand Fracture Hand Surgery

Ask a Doctor – Hand Fractures

Hand surgeon Brian P. Kelley, MD, answers your questions about a broken hand.

How do I know if I broke a bone in my hand?

Breaking a bone, or fracturing a bone as a doctor may refer to it, is a common injury that can occur at any age.  In fact, fractures of the bones of the hand represent one of the most common reasons for a visit to the emergency department in the United States (about 1.5% of all emergency visits). Also, fractures of the fingers represent about 10% of all types of fractures.

Fractures often occur after physical trauma, such as during sports, work, or falls. However, it’s important to remember that not all hand injuries involve a fracture of the bone.  Other injuries, such as sprains or dislocations, may occur around the bones, but may not actually involve a break. In these cases, the soft tissues that hold bones together may be injured (such as ligaments, tendons, muscles, or cartilage).

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Bones Elbow Elbow Fracture Hand

Ask a Doctor: Elbow Fractures

Elbow Fractures

Hand surgeon Benjamin R. Graves, MD answers your questions about elbow fractures.


Of all the joints in the body, the elbow is one of the most complex.  This complexity comes from the fact that the “elbow joint” is made up of three separate joints that form where the humerus, radius, and ulna bones meet.  Under normal circumstances, these three joints work together seamlessly to allow the flexion, extension, and forearm rotation we need to brush our hair and teeth, feed ourselves, turn a door handle, serve a tennis ball, and perform a multitude of other daily tasks.

Fractures involving the elbow can range in severity, from relatively minor injuries that heal on their own, to more severe injuries that require surgery.  Elbow fractures can also lead to a lot of questions for patients and their families.  I have compiled a list of five questions that I am frequently asked regarding elbow fractures.

I hurt my elbow. How do I know if I have an elbow fracture?

Elbow fractures can occur in a variety of ways.  Low-energy injuries, such as falls from standing or bumping the elbow onto a hard object can lead to small, stable fractures that can easily be mistaken for a sprain or strain.  They don’t always cause deformity or instability, and might only cause limited swelling and hurt-to-the-touch in a specific location.  These injuries may hurt for days or weeks and then stop hurting on their own.

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Bones Kienbock's Disease Wrist Wrist Pain

Ask a Doctor: Kienbock’s Disease

kienbocks

Dr. Mark Yuhas answers your questions about Kienbock’s Disease:

What is Kienbock’s Disease?

Kienbock’s Disease, also known as avascular necrosis of the lunate, is a disease that can result in pain and stiffness in the wrist. The lunate is one of eight small bones in the wrist that give the wrist its complex and unique motion.  “Avascular necrosis” is a lack of blood supply to the bone, which results in bone death. Blood supply is important to all bones to grow, heal, and provide structure and support to the body. Without blood supply, the lunate may not provide the same support and structure needed for proper wrist function.

What is the cause of Kienbock’s Disease? Can it be prevented?

There are several theories about the cause of Kienbock’s Disease, but a single cause has not been identified. Multiple variables are thought to be involved, including a history of wrist trauma. Other contributing factors include variations in anatomy such as the position of the forearm bones at the wrist, the shape of the lunate, and the pattern of blood supply to the lunate. Most of these factors are not able to be controlled by the patient.

There is no way that we know to prevent Kienbock’s Disease. However, it is important to identify this problem as soon as possible in order to prevent progression of the disease which can lead to wrist arthritis. This ultimately can cause pain, stiffness, and decreased function in the wrist.

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Anatomy Bones Shoulder

Anatomy 101: Shoulder Bones

There are five major bones in the shoulder. The shoulder bones can easily be affected by falls or accidents, in addition to arthritis. Here is an overview of the shoulder bones:

  1. Scapula: Another name for this bone is the shoulder blade. There are 17 muscles that attach to the scapula! Much of your shoulder motion is between the scapula and the chest. The scapula is part of the “shoulder girdle” which also includes muscle and ligament that allow your shoulder to move.
  2. Clavicle: This bone is also referred to as the collar bone. The clavicle connects the arm to the chest. It has joints on both ends, which can become arthritic.
  3. Acromion: This bone is a flat projection of the scapula that gives the shoulder its square shape.
  4. Coracoid Process: This bone is also a projection of the scapula. It points outward toward the front of the body. This bone is important because its muscles and ligaments help support the clavicle, shoulder joint and humerus.
  5. Glenoid Cavity: This is the socket portion of the ball-and-socket joint of the shoulder. Any abnormalities in the cavity can cause joint instability, which can lead to a condition called “frozen shoulder.”

Learn more about the shoulder bones and the anatomy of the upper extremity (including the hand, wrist, arm and shoulder) at www.HandCare.org/hand-arm-anatomy.

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