Category : Broken Hand

Bones Broken Hand Hand Hand Therapy

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: How Do Broken Bones Heal?

 

Have you ever wondered how a broken bone heals? Broken bones, also called fractures, can heal two different ways.  The two types of bone healing are primary and secondary bone healing.  Secondary bone healing is more common than primary bone healing.

Secondary bone healing occurs when there is slight, controlled motion between the two ends of broken bone during the healing time.   For example, slight motion occurs when the broken bone is set in a cast.  Once the broken bone has been aligned back to its normal position and is placed in a cast, proper healing can begin.

In addition, secondary bone healing progresses through different stages.  The first stage occurs immediately after the fracture.  In this stage, there is swelling and bleeding around the broken bone.  The bleeding then becomes a mass around the break.  This mass is first known as a soft callus and eventually becomes a hard callus.  Once the soft callus becomes hard, the bone is stable.  After a cast is removed, the hard callus is gradually remodeled to normal bone.  This can take up to several years.

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Bones Broken Hand Hand Fracture Hand Surgery

Ask a Doctor – Hand Fractures

Hand surgeon Brian P. Kelley, MD, answers your questions about a broken hand.

How do I know if I broke a bone in my hand?

Breaking a bone, or fracturing a bone as a doctor may refer to it, is a common injury that can occur at any age.  In fact, fractures of the bones of the hand represent one of the most common reasons for a visit to the emergency department in the United States (about 1.5% of all emergency visits). Also, fractures of the fingers represent about 10% of all types of fractures.

Fractures often occur after physical trauma, such as during sports, work, or falls. However, it’s important to remember that not all hand injuries involve a fracture of the bone.  Other injuries, such as sprains or dislocations, may occur around the bones, but may not actually involve a break. In these cases, the soft tissues that hold bones together may be injured (such as ligaments, tendons, muscles, or cartilage).

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