Category : Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Anatomy Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand

Video: The Anatomy of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome


Carpal tunnel syndrome
is a common condition affecting the hands. Patients typically say that they wake up at night with a feeling of pins and needles in their fingers, like their hand is asleep. They commonly shake their hands out to relive the symptoms. As the problem progresses, their hands will go numb when they drive, talk on the phone, or do their hair. As the problem becomes more severe, they will eventually report constant numbness in their fingers.

All of the nerves that go to the hand originate from the spinal cord at the neck level. The median nerve goes down the arm and crosses the wrist under a ligament called the transverse carpal ligament. This nerve then gives sensation to the thumb, index and long finger, as well as half the ring finger. Watch this 2-minute animation to learn more about how carpal tunnel affects your hand.

You can also read more about carpal tunnel on our website, www.HandCare.org.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Hand Surgery

Random Fact: Recovering from Carpal Tunnel Surgery

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Did you know? After carpal tunnel surgery, you can begin using a keyboard again within two weeks. Now that’s a fast recovery! Learn more about Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and how it’s treated.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Hand Surgery Pain

5 Ways You Can Ease Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Pain Without Surgery

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from the Cleveland Clinic

Does the thumb side of your hand feel like it’s going to sleep — that weak, numb, pins-and-needles feeling — for no apparent reason? You may suspect that you have carpal tunnel syndrome.

The good news is that there are a number of methods you can try at home to ease your pain. And if those don’t work, surgery can be a highly effective treatment.

What is carpel tunnel syndrome?

Carpel tunnel syndrome is a fairly common condition that affects the hand and wrist, says hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder surgeon William Seitz, MD.

“Symptoms include numbness, tingling and pain, usually in your thumb and the first three fingers of your hand,” Dr. Seitz says.

Carpel tunnel syndrome happens when the median nerve, which runs from your forearm to your hand through a narrow space called the carpel tunnel, is compressed or pinched, Dr. Seitz says.

Read the full story.

 

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Nerves Wrist

5 Signs of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Man holding his hand - pain concept

Carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common conditions of the hand. It happens when there is pressure on the median nerve in the wrist. It can be caused by things like arthritis and fractures, but, ultimately, there can be many causes.

Here are 5 signs that you may have carpal tunnel:

  1. Pain
  2. Numbness
  3. Tingling
  4. Weaker grip
  5. Tendency to drop things

Numbness and tingling is common in the thumb and pointer, middle and ring fingers. Sometimes, symptoms can be worse during the night, but they can also be felt during daily activities.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Nerves Wrist

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Check out this latest video from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand that explains the causes, symptoms and treatment options for carpal tunnel syndrome.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused by swelling in the carpal tunnel, which puts pressure on the nerve.  This pressure can happen due to joint dislocations, fractures, arthritis, and many other causes. Symptoms can include pain, numbness, tingling, a weak grip and clumsiness. Learn more about carpal tunnel syndrome at www.handcare.org.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Nerves Wrist

Carpal Tunnel and Migraines

Could your splitting migraine possibly be related to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Check out the latest ASSH Facebook post about recent findings that link the two.


Learn more about the link between #carpaltunnel and #migraines that member Douglas M. Sammers, MD, FACS and a team of other plastic surgeons at UT Southwestern Medical Center found. http://bit.ly/1bLhomM

Posted by American Society for Surgery of the Hand on Monday, April 27, 2015

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Finger Hand Wrist

Ask a Doctor: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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Dr. Benjamin J. Jacobs, an orthopaedic surgeon, answers your questions about carpal tunnel syndrome.

Q: What is the carpal tunnel?
A: It is an actual tunnel made from the bones in your wrist and a tough ligament. The carpal tunnel nerve (median nerve) and several tendons run through the carpal tunnel. The thumb, index finger, middle finger and half of the ring finger get their sensibility from the carpal tunnel nerve.

Q: What does carpal tunnel syndrome feel like?
A: It varies on the person. The most common feelings people tell me about carpal tunnel syndrome are numbness, tingling, pain, weakness, and clumsiness (frequently dropping things, difficulty with buttons or needle work). The numbness or tingling most often takes place in the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers. Very commonly, people wake at night or in the morning and have to “shake out” the numbness from their hand.

Q: How does carpal tunnel syndrome happen?
A: Anything that increases pressure on the carpal tunnel nerve can cause carpal tunnel syndrome. Often, we don’t ever find out why someone develops carpal tunnel syndrome.  Sometimes we see carpal tunnel syndrome in the setting of certain medical conditions such as diabetes, thyroid problems, and pregnancy. Often it is not just one thing causing carpal tunnel syndrome, but a combination of factors.

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