Category : Elbow

Elbow Hand Hand Therapy Wrist

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist on Desk Posture

a woman sitting at a desk and has pain in the back. symbol photo for proper posture at work in the office.

I sit at a desk most of the workday, keyboarding. My wrists and elbows are always aching. Is there anything I can do?

If you spend most of your day at a desk, your work station should be evaluated and adjusted to ensure proper positioning and desk posture. Your work station should be set up specifically for you. There are many symptoms that may occur from sitting at a poorly designed work station. These symptoms include fatigue or soreness of wrists, elbows, neck, scapular region and lower back. Eventually, if these signs aren’t addressed, you may start to experience pain or numbness and tingling in these areas. If your work station is shared, it should be adjustable to fit the needs of all who use that workstation.

What should my work station look like?

Proper workstation assessment should include looking at the height of your chair, the type of keyboard and mouse you’re using, and position of your monitor. Proper height of your chair should allow ankles, knees, hips and elbows to rest at 90 degrees.

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Cubital Tunnel Syndrome Elbow Hand Nerves

Ask a Doctor: Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

ask a doctor_cubital tunnel

Dr. Douglas E. Pittner answers your questions about Cubital Tunnel Syndrome.

My doctor said I have cubital tunnel syndrome.  What does that mean?
The cubital tunnel is the name for a space, like a tunnel, at the inside of the elbow.  It is where your ulnar nerve (the “funny bone” nerve) travels around the elbow and into your forearm.  Sometimes problems develop in this area.  It is possible for this tunnel to be too tight, causing pressure on the ulnar nerve.  The nerve can also be stretched as it travels around the elbow.  Cubital tunnel syndrome refers to the pain, numbness, or weakness that is caused by these problems around the elbow.

Why do my fingers to go numb?
The ulnar nerve travels from your elbow to your hand and provides sensation to your fingers as well as connections to important muscles in your hand.  The nerve acts like an electrical wire that sends signals to and from the hand.  When this nerve is stretched or compressed at the elbow, the electrical signals can be slow.  Your body interprets this as numbness or tingling, usually in the small and ring fingers.  You may experience pain in the elbow or forearm.  Weakness can also develop in the hand muscles which can cause decreased strength with gripping or pinching.

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Elbow Hand Joints Shoulder Wrist

How to protect your wrists, elbows and shoulders during yoga

Group of three young women practicing the side plank pose during yoga class in a gym

from Huffpost Healthy Living

Some of the most common injuries in yoga are muscle or joint problems, though most problems are mild. Yoga can even be a safe and helpful form of exercise for people with joint issues like rheumatoid arthritis, as long as you know how to modify postures with the help of your yoga teacher.

Here are seven tips to help keep your joints healthy and safe in yoga:

1. Protect your wrists: Spread your hands wide and evenly when your hands bear weight, such as in Downward Facing Dog Pose.

Beginners in yoga often tent their hands in Downward Facing Dog Pose, but this actually makes it more difficult on your hands and wrists. Make sure that your hands are spread wide and ground all corners of your palm on your mat. Your hands should be pressed down firmly enough that someone would not be able to pluck your fingers off the mat.

Dr. David Wei of Orthopaedic & Neurosurgery Specialists in Greenwich, CT, an orthopedic hand surgeon who specializes in injuries of the hand, wrist, and elbow, explains:

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Anatomy Elbow Hand

Anatomy 101: Elbow Tendons



The elbow is where your forearm and upper arm join together. Elbow tendons help connect muscles and bones, allowing your arm to bend and straighten. Here are some specifics:

  • Biceps brachii tendons: Connect the muscle in the upper arm to the bones near the front shoulder and to the radius bone at the elbow. These tendons help bend (flex) the elbow and rotate the forearm.
  • Tricep brachii tendons: Connect the muscle in the upper arm to the bones near the shoulder and to the ulna bone at the back of the elbow. These tendons help straighten (extend) the elbow.
  • Brachialis tendon: Connects the muscle in the upper arm to the ulna bone of the forearm near the elbow. This tendon helps bend (flex) the elbow.
  • Brachioradialis tendons: Connect the muscle in the forearm to the humerus bone in the upper arm and the radius bone in the forearm near the wrist. These tendons help bend (flex) the elbow.
  • Supinator tendons: Connect the muscle in the forearm to the humerus bone in the upper arm and the radius bone in the forearm near the elbow. These tendons allow the muscle to rotate the forearm.

View full-detail illustrations on the interactive anatomy page at for more information.

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Elbow Hand Hand Therapy Lateral Epicondylitis Tennis Elbow

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist on Tennis Elbow

a man holds his painful, aching elbow ** Note: Shallow depth of field

I have pain on the outside of my elbow when reaching for objects with my elbow extended. The pain increases if the object weighs more than a few pounds, such as a gallon of milk, a coffee pot or the laundry detergent. How did I get this pain?

The condition you are describing may be lateral epicondylitis, more commonly known as “tennis elbow.” The irony is that this overuse condition often occurs in non-tennis players from improper lifting and carrying of objects, or from performing activities that are highly repetitive in nature. The activities translate force to the outside of the elbow, causing inflammation and micro-tears in the tendon (see diagram below).

There are times when my elbow is really painful. Is there a treatment for healing the micro-tears?

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Elbow Golf Hand Shoulder Wrist

How to prevent golf injuries

Golf Injuries v1

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Elbow Elbow Fracture Hand

6 signs of an elbow fracture

A young woman touching her painful elbow

An elbow fracture is another term for a broken elbow. It can result from a fall, a direct blow to the elbow, or an abnormal twisting of the arm. An x-ray can confirm if you have fractured your elbow, but how do you know whether to visit a hand surgeon or the emergency room? Here are 6 signs of an elbow fracture:

  1. Swelling and bruising of the elbow
  2. Extreme pain
  3. Stiffness in and around the elbow
  4. Snap or pop at the time of the injury
  5. Visible deformity
  6. Numbness or weakness in the arm, wrist and hand

Some elbow fractures are more severe than others. If the bones have not moved and have low risk of moving, a sling, cast or splint will be used to treat the injury. If the fracture is more severe, surgery may be required.

Learn more about the different types of elbow fractures, potential treatment options, and long-term side effects of this injury at

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Elbow Hand Lateral Epicondylitis Tennis Elbow

Symptoms, causes and treatment of Tennis Elbow

This 2-minute video tells you everything you need to know about the painful condition Lateral Epicondylitis, also known as Tennis Elbow.

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