Category : Finger

Congenital Finger Hand Syndactyly

What is Syndactyly?

Hand surgeon Reena Anjalie Bhatt, MD answers your questions about webbed fingers, also known as syndactyly.

What is syndactyly?

Syndactyly is a condition in which a child is born with two fused fingers or toes. This can occur in the hands or the feet or both. It can occur in one hand or foot, or all four. Syndactyly is the most common congenital malformation of the limbs.

Most commonly, the fused fingers or toes are joined by soft tissue, this is termed simple syndactyly. When adjacent finger bones are fused as well as the soft tissue, this is termed complex syndactyly. When fingers are fused all the way to the fingertips, this is termed complete, whereas fusion that occurs only partway across the webspace is termed incomplete. Syndactyly can occur as part of a syndrome. Complex syndactyly with bony fusion more commonly occurs with with a syndrome. Apert syndrome and Poland syndrome are two examples of syndromes with syndactyly association.

Syndactyly can occur sporadically or be inherited and occurs in 1 out of 2,000 births. In 15-40% of patients there is a family history.

Read More
Cold Hand Disease Finger Raynaud's Raynaud's Phenomenon

What is Raynaud’s Disease?

Hand surgeon Ekkehard Bonatz, MD, PhD answers your questions about Raynaud’s disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon, and the difference between the two.

What is Raynaud’s?

Raynaud’s is known as Raynaud’s disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon and Raynaud’s syndrome. It is a medical condition in which the circulation to your fingertips is interrupted. The fingers, and sometimes toes, will turn pale and white as they have no blood supply. After a while they turn blue, and you may experience discomfort or pain. Eventually the blood flow to the fingers returns, making them appear red, and your fingers may burn. The problem then settles down, with return of normal circulation and feeling, and the burning disappears. The periods of discoloration may last from a few minutes to several hours.

Read More
Finger Joints Knuckles

Is Knuckle Cracking Safe?

Hand surgeon Omar Nazir, MD answers your questions about knuckle cracking.

Crack!  Pop!  Snap!  We are all familiar with the unique sounds that come from our joints.  While knuckle cracking causes some to breathe a side of relief, other cringe at the sound.

What causes the “cracking” sound?

Numerous theories have been proposed as to the cause of these sounds.  Over the past hundred years ideas ranging from the realignment of tendons, small bands within the joints (plicas) and sudden tightening of the joint capsule have all been proposed.

Read More
Finger Stiff Fingers Stiffness

10 Causes of Stiff Fingers

Hand surgeon Thomas R. Boyce, MD discusses why your fingers may be stiff and how to treat them.

Stiff fingers can be very troublesome.  Your hands and fingers are vital tools with which you interact with the world.  Without normal use of your hands and fingers, activities including household tasks, work, hobbies, and sports all can become more difficult.

Read More
Finger Hand Hand Pain Hand Therapy

5 Common Hand and Finger Exercises

If you’ve suffered an injury, are recovering from surgery or are living with a condition that affects your hands, chances are you’ve seen a hand therapist or have received instructions to do so by your hand surgeon. Hand therapists are essential to helping patients recover from injuries or surgeries and can help those in pain get back to living a normal life. Hand therapists and hand surgeons often work closely together to determine the best outcome for their patients.

Read More
Arthritis Finger Swelling

How to Get Rid of Swollen Fingers

Swollen fingers can develop for a variety of reasons, including a medical condition such as arthritis, an injury such as a broken bone, or even a hot day. It’s the body’s natural healing response to extra fluid and blood in the fingers and can cause you to feel uncomfortable and/or unable to completely move your fingers. While it can sometimes be painful, swollen fingers are common and can be treated right at home.

Try these methods for reducing swelling in your fingers:

Read More
Finger Fingertip Injury Hand

Ask a Doctor: Fingertip Injuries

Hand surgeon Ryan Zimmerman, MD answers your questions about fingertip injuries.

Fingertip Injuries

What are fingertips made of?

Fingertips have several parts, all with special purposes.  At the core is the bone, called the distal phalanx, which provides support and shape to the end of the finger.  On the top and bottom of the bone are tendons that attach to the bone and make it move.  On the top rests the nail, supported by the specialized nail bed skin just below.  The rest of the fingertip is covered by skin that has lots of nerves, which give fingertips their sensitivity. 

Are fingertip injuries common?  How do they happen?

Fingertips are one of the most commonly injured body parts, and injuries can happen lots of different ways.  Two common ways are cuts, such as from a knife, or crush injuries, such as getting caught in a car door or under a heavy object. 

Read More
Boutonnière Deformity Finger Joints Thumb

What is a Boutonnière Deformity?

Boutonnière deformity is when the finger or thumb is bent down at the middle joint and bent backwards at the end joint (see photo above). This deformity can happen for a couple of different reasons, including:

  1. A cut tendon on the back of the finger or thumb
  2. Tearing or weakening of the tendon from a disease such as rheumatoid arthritis

These two reasons are what can cause the middle joint to bend down. The backwards bending of the end joint is caused after the middle joint bends because there is more pull on the end joint of the finger.

Read More
1 2 3 7