Category : Finger

Arthritis Finger Knuckles

A Hand Surgeon’s Advice About Knuckle Cracking

from Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

ASSH hand surgeon member Sanjeev Kakar, MD talks to Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute about knuckle cracking. Is it good for you? Does it make your knuckles big and swollen? Does it give you arthritis? Hear what he has to say in this new podcast.


Real deal or wives’ tale: Knuckle cracking can cause harm, including arthritis? In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, we hear from a hand surgeon and his answer may surprise you.

Listen to the podcast.

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Anatomy Finger Hand Joints

Anatomy 101: Finger Joints

Joints are cartilage surfaces that connect bones to each other. This cartilage allows our bones to glide smoothly against one another, allowing us painless movement. There are four joints in each finger, totaling 20 joints in each hand!

The small, ringer, middle and index fingers all have the same four joints:

  1. Distal Interphalangeal Joint (DIP): The DIP joint is located at the tip of the finger, just before the finger nail starts. Arthritis can develop at this joint, and it is also commonly fractured.
  2. Proximal Interphalangeal Joint (PIP): The PIP joint is the joint just below the DIP joint. It is located below the top two bones of the finger and allows the finger to bend and extend. This joint can become stiff easily after injury.
  3. Metacarpophalangeal Joint (MCP): The MP joint is where the hand bone meets the finger bone, referred to as the “knuckle.” These joints are very important, allowing us to bend/flex and spread our fingers.
  4. Carpometacarpal Joint (CMC Joint): The CMC joint is located at the bottom of the hand bone. This joint varies in each finger. For example, in the index finger, it has little motion. In the small finger, it has a lot of motion. Injuries and problems with this joint are uncommon.

The thumb joints are a little different than the other finger joints. To learn more about the thumb joints and more about the finger joints, visit our online Anatomy section.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

5 Steps to Removing a Stuck Ring

Getting a ring stuck on your finger is not uncommon. It can happen if you force a ring onto your finger that is too small, but it can also happen over time. Sometimes, your joints become arthritic, causing the joints or tissue to swell, which can cause the ring to get stuck.

Here’s an easy way to remove a stuck ring in 5 steps:

  1. Squirt some Windex (or some soap or oil) on the finger and ring to lubricate it.
  2. Elevate the hand overhead for 5-10 minutes with ice around the ring and finger.
  3. Slide a long string of dental floss (or other thread) under the stuck ring with the bulk of it toward the fingertip (Figure 1).
  4. Beginning at the top of the ring, tightly wrap the floss around and around your finger all the way up and over the knuckle (Figure 2).
  5. Take the opposite end of the string and begin to unwrap the floss. The ring will slide over the knuckle as you go (Figure 3).
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Finger Hand Thumb Trigger Finger

Video: Symptoms and Treatment for Trigger Finger

Trigger Finger is a common but debilitating condition of the hand. Its formal name is stenosing tenosynovitis and is sometimes called “trigger thumb.” Many times, the finger will lock up. Other symptoms include:

  • Pain at the base of the thumb or finger
  • Sensitivity to pressure
  • Lumps
  • Popping
  • Limited finger movement

Trigger Finger can interfere with daily activities such as cooking, playing music, typing, etc. Surgery can be an option for treating this condition, but night splints, medication, or steroid injections can also be possibilities. Watch our 5-minute video above for more information about trigger finger. You can also visit our trigger finger page.

Treatment for a hand condition varies depending on your situation. Find a hand surgeon near you to determine your best course of action.

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Finger Hand Texting Thumb Thumb Pain

Random Fact: Texting Thumb

Did you know? There is no technical diagnosis called “texting thumb,” but pain from repetitive motions, such as texting, can be treated. Learn more.

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Bacteria Finger Hand Hand Infection

11 Types of Hand Infections

Hand infections can cause serious problems and symptoms, both before and after the infection is resolved. They can result in stiff hands, weak hands, and loss of tissues such as skin, nerve and bone.  It is important to visit a hand surgeon immediately and get early treatment if you have signs of one of these hand infections:

1. Atypical Mycobacterial Infection: This infection can result from puncture wounds from fish spines or contamination of a wound or cut from stagnant water (in nature or from aquariums). It will come on gradually, and you may feel stiffness and swelling.

2. Bite Wound Infection: This can be caused by a human or animal bite due to bacteria in the mouth. Seek treatment immediately after a bite wound.

3. Cellulitis: This is a skin infection that can cause skin redness, warmth, and pain. People with cellulitis may have a fever or feel sick. Seek treatment immediately, as this infection can cause serious problems.

4. Deep Space Infection: One of the compartments or “deep spaces” of the hand can become infected even from a small puncture. A pocket of puss may form at the base of the thumb, on the palm, or between the fingers.

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Finger Hand Systemic Disease

8 Examples of Systemic Diseases

Rheumatoid arthritis , Gout arthritis ( Film x-ray both hands of child with multiple joint arthritis ) ( Medical , Science and Health care concept )

A systemic disease is a disease that affects other parts of the body, or even the whole body. The hands are complex. They are composed of many types of tissue including blood vessels, nerves, skin and skin-related tissues, bones, and muscles/tendons/ligaments. Because of this complexity, the hands may suffer from side effects of systemic diseases. Here are some examples that may affect the hand:

1. Arthritic Swelling: Swelling of the middle joint of a finger is called a Bouchard’s node, and swelling at the small finger joints are called Heberden’s nodes.

2. Dactylitis: Dactylitis can sometimes be associated with psoriatic arthritis.  It can cause swelling and stiffness in the fingers. There also may be pain.  This swelling may be improved with medicines for the problem causing it.

3. Mucous Cyst: With a mucous cyst, if the skin becomes thin, the cyst may break resulting in drainage of a clear sticky fluid.  This may allow bacteria to reach the nearby joint, causing a joint or bone infection.

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Dupuytren's Contracture Finger Hand Lumps and Bumps

Ask a Doctor – Dupuytren’s Contracture

ask-a-doctor_dupuytren

 

Dr. Steven H. Goldberg answers your questions about Dupuytren’s contracture.

I noticed a new lump on the palm of my hand, and I noticed my tendon is visible and tight where I can’t fully straighten my finger. What could this be?

Dupuytren’s contracture, or fibromatosis, is a condition that can cause lumps on the palm of the hand; it also causes cords on the palm or fingers. The cord is not the tendon but rather a thickening of the fascia, a normal structure below the skin. The cord contains myofibroblasts which have a muscle-like quality that pull on the skin causing puckering, dimpling, and bending of the finger. The lumps and cords can also occur on the soles of the feet. Some people are more likely to have this disease due to genetics.

How do you know this lump is Dupuytren’s and not cancer?

Most lumps in the palm are not cancerous. Skin cancers are more common in sun-exposed areas, so a lump on the back of the hand is more likely to be cancerous compared to one on the palm.  Dupuytren’s lumps in the palm of the hand most commonly form in the ring and small finger. Skin puckering or dimpling can occur, and you typically can’t fully straighten your fingers. This loss of motion is less common with other masses or tumors. Dupuytren’s lumps are typically not painful and usually do not grow much.  A more worrisome bump or lump is often painful, can have rapid growth, and can either be painful at night or when resting. If a patient is very concerned about the lump, it can be surgically biopsied to confirm it is Dupuytren’s contracture.

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