Category : Finger

Finger Hand Hangnail

Why You Should Never, Ever Rip Off Your Hangnail

Hang Nail

from Men’s Health

Hangnails can make any grown man wince. They’re pesky, and even though they’re so small, they can hurt like hell.

“Most people don’t notice a hangnail until after it has fully developed and they feel roughness around the nail or pain from inflammation,” says Benjamin J. Jacobs, M.D., hand surgeon at Rebound Orthopedics and Neurosurgery in Portland, Oregon.

But they happen to everyone, and they can be particularly bad in winter months. But here’s how to prevent hangnails from happening and the best ways treat the ones that already exist.

Read the full story.

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Finger Hand Swan Neck Deformity

What is a Swan Neck Deformity?

Swan Neck Deformity
A Swan Neck Deformity is a deformity of the finger in which the middle joint is bent back more than normal, and the tip of the finger is bent down. Sometimes, this deformity can be caused by an injury. Other times, it can happen over time due to a condition such as rheumatoid arthritis.

The odd bending of the finger is usually due to a tear of a ligament in the middle joint of the finger.  Sometimes, the tendon is torn. It causes the tendon to become weak. Eventually, the ability of the tendons to straighten the joint becomes lessened, causing the bending. Here are some signs that you have a Swan Neck Deformity:

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Cold Hand Disease Finger Hand Raynaud's Phenomenon

Raynaud’s Disease: Why Your Hands and Feet Hurt So Badly When They’re Cold

from SELF

Winter is terrible for many reasons, seasonal affective disorder, treacherous slicks of ice, and the infinite quest for moisturized skin among them. But for people with Raynaud’s disease (sometimes called Raynaud’s phenomenon or syndrome), winter can also make their hands and feet go numb, then ache, and even turn every color of the American flag in the process. It would be an impressive party trick if it weren’t so painful.

Raynaud’s symptoms are painfully distinct.

It’s not just that your fingers feel cold when you trudge through the snow (or frolic, depending on your opinion of winter). “It’s impressive, this change,” vascular surgeon Daiva Nevidomskyte, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Surgery at Duke University School of Medicine, tells SELF. “Within a couple of minutes, people’s fingers turn pale, then blue, and once they’re reheated, they turn red. It’s a pretty dramatic response.”

Beyond the visible changes, when someone is having a Raynaud’s attack, the lack of blood flow will lead to numbness and pain in the affected body part as it turns white and blue. When the blood flow returns, the body part starts to redden, and nerves reacting to the renewed circulation will cause tingling, throbbing, or burning, Mounir Haurani, M.D., vascular surgeon and assistant professor at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, tells SELF.

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Dupuytren's Contracture Finger Hand

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist on Dupuytren’s Contracture

Dupuytren's ContractureDupuytren's ContractureDupuytren's Contracture

Why can’t I straighten my finger?

Dupuytren’s Contracture is a benign disorder of the hand that may result in tightening of the palm and bending of the fingers. When it begins, the palm or finger(s) appear to have bumps and later may develop a rope-y appearance.  It is not usually painful, but in some cases, discomfort is reported. The condition is most common in men (almost 5 to 1 versus women) of Northwestern European descent and onset increases with age (over 40).

The condition usually starts with the first knuckle. If it progresses, the middle knuckle may also bend. The fingers most affected are the ring and small, with possible progression to the long, index and thumb. Early signs of Dupuytren’s Contracture may include the appearance of “pitting/dimpling” in the palm. It may become difficult to place the hand on a flat surface, put on gloves, or put the hand in a pocket.

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Arthritis Finger Knuckles

A Hand Surgeon’s Advice About Knuckle Cracking

from Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

ASSH hand surgeon member Sanjeev Kakar, MD talks to Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute about knuckle cracking. Is it good for you? Does it make your knuckles big and swollen? Does it give you arthritis? Hear what he has to say in this new podcast.


Real deal or wives’ tale: Knuckle cracking can cause harm, including arthritis? In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, we hear from a hand surgeon and his answer may surprise you.

Listen to the podcast.

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Anatomy Finger Hand Joints

Anatomy 101: Finger Joints

Joints are cartilage surfaces that connect bones to each other. This cartilage allows our bones to glide smoothly against one another, allowing us painless movement. There are four joints in each finger, totaling 20 joints in each hand!

The small, ringer, middle and index fingers all have the same four joints:

  1. Distal Interphalangeal Joint (DIP): The DIP joint is located at the tip of the finger, just before the finger nail starts. Arthritis can develop at this joint, and it is also commonly fractured.
  2. Proximal Interphalangeal Joint (PIP): The PIP joint is the joint just below the DIP joint. It is located below the top two bones of the finger and allows the finger to bend and extend. This joint can become stiff easily after injury.
  3. Metacarpophalangeal Joint (MCP): The MP joint is where the hand bone meets the finger bone, referred to as the “knuckle.” These joints are very important, allowing us to bend/flex and spread our fingers.
  4. Carpometacarpal Joint (CMC Joint): The CMC joint is located at the bottom of the hand bone. This joint varies in each finger. For example, in the index finger, it has little motion. In the small finger, it has a lot of motion. Injuries and problems with this joint are uncommon.

The thumb joints are a little different than the other finger joints. To learn more about the thumb joints and more about the finger joints, visit our online Anatomy section.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

5 Steps to Removing a Stuck Ring

Getting a ring stuck on your finger is not uncommon. It can happen if you force a ring onto your finger that is too small, but it can also happen over time. Sometimes, your joints become arthritic, causing the joints or tissue to swell, which can cause the ring to get stuck.

Here’s an easy way to remove a stuck ring in 5 steps:

  1. Squirt some Windex (or some soap or oil) on the finger and ring to lubricate it.
  2. Elevate the hand overhead for 5-10 minutes with ice around the ring and finger.
  3. Slide a long string of dental floss (or other thread) under the stuck ring with the bulk of it toward the fingertip (Figure 1).
  4. Beginning at the top of the ring, tightly wrap the floss around and around your finger all the way up and over the knuckle (Figure 2).
  5. Take the opposite end of the string and begin to unwrap the floss. The ring will slide over the knuckle as you go (Figure 3).
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Finger Hand Thumb Trigger Finger

Video: Symptoms and Treatment for Trigger Finger

Trigger Finger is a common but debilitating condition of the hand. Its formal name is stenosing tenosynovitis and is sometimes called “trigger thumb.” Many times, the finger will lock up. Other symptoms include:

  • Pain at the base of the thumb or finger
  • Sensitivity to pressure
  • Lumps
  • Popping
  • Limited finger movement

Trigger Finger can interfere with daily activities such as cooking, playing music, typing, etc. Surgery can be an option for treating this condition, but night splints, medication, or steroid injections can also be possibilities. Watch our 5-minute video above for more information about trigger finger. You can also visit our trigger finger page.

Treatment for a hand condition varies depending on your situation. Find a hand surgeon near you to determine your best course of action.

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