Category : Finger

Cold Hand Disease Finger Hand

How to know if you have Cold Hand Disease

Close up of young beautiful woman hands holding hot cup of coffee or tea. Morning coffee cold season office coffee break or coffee lover concept.

Do your hands always seem cold? You may have cold hand disease, which is a condition that can occur due to a decrease in blood flow in the hand. Here are some signs that you may have this disease:

  1. Your hands are cold even in mild weather.
  2. Your fingers hurt in cold temperatures.
  3. You have to wear gloves when handling frozen foods.
  4. Your hands turn a shade of blue, white or red sometimes.
  5. Minor cuts on your fingers take longer to heal than normal.

In a normal hand, blood travels from the heart, down the arm, all the way to the fingertips, which keeps the hands warm. In an individual with cold hand disease, blood flow is decreased due to vasoconstriction (when the blood vessels in the hand become smaller, allowing less blood to flow) or vaso-occlusion (when the normal process of temporarily applying more muscle pressure to your blood vessels becomes abnormally strong or prolonged).

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Finger Football Hand Sports Injury

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Football Hand Injuries

Football

Football season is finally here! My friends and I like to go play a few flag football games during this time of year. I really don’t see too many football hand injuries putting NFL players on the disabled list (DL). Should I be concerned about hand injuries?

Numerous studies find a large percentage of emergency room visits are for hand injuries from recreational sports. Nearly half of these are from either football or basketball. Unfortunately, NFL players tend to play through their finger injuries. Take a look at Michael Strahan talking about his finger injuries. (How about the most twisted hand injuries in NFL history?)

What kind of hand injuries should I worry about?

As you can see from the video and photos of the NFL players, hand injuries from football typically involve tendons, ligaments and/or bones. Injuries to the tendons that straighten the finger are called mallet finger and central slip injuries. A jersey finger is an injury to the tendon that bends the finger.

The thumb and the middle joints of the fingers (jammed finger) are prone to ligament injuries. Hand injuries can progress to deformities if left untreated. An example of this is a boutonniere deformity.

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Finger Hand Joints Knuckles

News Story: Knuckle-cracking is actually good for you

Hand Massage. Pain in the finger joints. Arthralgia

from CNN

(CNN) – For the past 15 years, Tanya Johnson has been driving her boss nuts.

It’s not her job skills — Dr. Robert Szabo says Johnson is an excellent nurse — but rather her incessant knuckle-cracking that makes him want to strangle her.

“I kept telling her to stop, that it was bad for her,” Szabo said.

You’d think Johnson might have listened, given that Szabo is a hand surgeon at the UC Davis Medical Center and former president of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.

But she just kept right on cracking.

“I told him, ‘Prove that it’s bad,’ ” she said.

Read the full story.

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Finger Hand Mallet Finger

Ask a Doctor: Mallet Finger

ask a doctor_mallet finger

Dr. Ben Jacobs answers your questions about Mallet Finger:

My finger droops even when I try to straighten the tip. What is going on?

A mallet finger is a very common condition and can happen to any of the fingers.  It occurs when the tendon that straightens your finger pulls away from the bone at the end of the finger. Sometimes the tendon takes a small piece of bone with it (mallet fracture) and other times not.  It might or might not hurt. Mallet fingers need treatment if you want to be able to straighten the finger again.

When should I seek treatment for my injury?

In the case of mallet finger, a trip to the emergency room isn’t usually needed unless the skin on the finger is severely injured.  However, you should see your doctor or hand surgeon as soon as you can — ideally within a few days or weeks — to begin treatment.  Success with treatment sometimes is possible if treatment starts a few months after the injury.

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Finger Hand Joint Replacement Joints

What is a finger joint replacement?

a man rubs the pain in his finger

from The Baltimore Sun

Dr. Ryan M. Zimmerman, MD discusses what causes finger joints to wear out and when a joint replacement is necessary.

The tiniest joints of the fingers can break down over time and, in some people, need to be replaced. The wear and tear can cause unbearable pain and stiffness. Dr. Ryan M. Zimmerman, a hand, shoulder and elbow surgeon at the Curtis National Hand Center at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, said replacement can provide much-needed relief for patients.

What causes finger joints to wear out?

Finger joints can wear out for a number of reasons. Osteoarthritis, which is primary wear and tear, is the most common. Inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, are also common. Finally, after trauma, joints can have residual irregularities that cause them to wear out more rapidly. Contrary to popular belief, repetitive activities such as typing have not been linked to arthritis.

Can all joints in the hand be replaced?

Many joints in the hand are candidates for joint replacement, but others are best treated with different kinds of surgery. The metacarpophalangeal joints, what people think of as their “knuckles,” that connect the finger to the palm and the joints just past those, are the best candidates for replacement. The joint at the base of the thumb, by far the most common place for people to develop arthritis, is best treated with a different kind of joint replacement surgery for patients who don’t get adequate relief from splints or injections. Also, the joints at the fingertips are best treated with a different type of surgery because they are too small for formal replacements.

Read the full story.

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Finger Hand Warts

5 things to know about warts

warts_cropped

Warts are bumps on the skin that may feel rough to the touch.  They stem from a virus called human papilloma virus (HPV), for which there is no cure. Here are 5 things to know about these pesky warts on your hands:

  1. Warts can be very itchy and uncomfortable, and they can bleed if irritated.
  2. Despite these symptoms, warts are usually not cancerous.
  3. Treatment options for warts may include duct tape, a pumice stone, freezing the bump or surgery.
  4. Most people fight off this virus within 2-3 years.
  5. Treating warts takes time, so be patient!

Learn more about warts on www.HandCare.org.

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Dupuytren's Contracture Finger Hand

Dupuytren’s Contracture: Symptoms and Treatment Options


Dupuytren’s contracture, sometimes known as Dupuytren’s disease, is a condition that causes bumps and thick cords to develop in the palm and fingers. It is more common in people over the age of 40. Sometimes, this condition causes the fingers to bend into the palm, which can make it difficult to place the hand on a flat surface.

The lumps can be uncomfortable in some people, but Dupuytren’s contracture is not typically painful. Sometimes, no treatment is necessary for this condition. For more severe cases, treatment options may include injections, medicine or hand therapy.

Watch this short video to learn more. Read about Dupuytren’s contracture on www.HandCare.org.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

Random Fact: Stuck Ring

woman is taking off the wedding ring

Did you know? A stuck ring can be the result of joint arthritis, which can happen as your body changes over the years. Learn more about how to remove a stuck ring safely.

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