Category : Finger

Finger Hand Joint Replacement Joints

What is a finger joint replacement?

a man rubs the pain in his finger

from The Baltimore Sun

Dr. Ryan M. Zimmerman, MD discusses what causes finger joints to wear out and when a joint replacement is necessary.

The tiniest joints of the fingers can break down over time and, in some people, need to be replaced. The wear and tear can cause unbearable pain and stiffness. Dr. Ryan M. Zimmerman, a hand, shoulder and elbow surgeon at the Curtis National Hand Center at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, said replacement can provide much-needed relief for patients.

What causes finger joints to wear out?

Finger joints can wear out for a number of reasons. Osteoarthritis, which is primary wear and tear, is the most common. Inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, are also common. Finally, after trauma, joints can have residual irregularities that cause them to wear out more rapidly. Contrary to popular belief, repetitive activities such as typing have not been linked to arthritis.

Can all joints in the hand be replaced?

Many joints in the hand are candidates for joint replacement, but others are best treated with different kinds of surgery. The metacarpophalangeal joints, what people think of as their “knuckles,” that connect the finger to the palm and the joints just past those, are the best candidates for replacement. The joint at the base of the thumb, by far the most common place for people to develop arthritis, is best treated with a different kind of joint replacement surgery for patients who don’t get adequate relief from splints or injections. Also, the joints at the fingertips are best treated with a different type of surgery because they are too small for formal replacements.

Read the full story.

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Finger Hand Warts

5 things to know about warts

warts_cropped

Warts are bumps on the skin that may feel rough to the touch.  They stem from a virus called human papilloma virus (HPV), for which there is no cure. Here are 5 things to know about these pesky warts on your hands:

  1. Warts can be very itchy and uncomfortable, and they can bleed if irritated.
  2. Despite these symptoms, warts are usually not cancerous.
  3. Treatment options for warts may include duct tape, a pumice stone, freezing the bump or surgery.
  4. Most people fight off this virus within 2-3 years.
  5. Treating warts takes time, so be patient!

Learn more about warts on www.HandCare.org.

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Dupuytren's Contracture Finger Hand

Dupuytren’s Contracture: Symptoms and Treatment Options


Dupuytren’s contracture, sometimes known as Dupuytren’s disease, is a condition that causes bumps and thick cords to develop in the palm and fingers. It is more common in people over the age of 40. Sometimes, this condition causes the fingers to bend into the palm, which can make it difficult to place the hand on a flat surface.

The lumps can be uncomfortable in some people, but Dupuytren’s contracture is not typically painful. Sometimes, no treatment is necessary for this condition. For more severe cases, treatment options may include injections, medicine or hand therapy.

Watch this short video to learn more. Read about Dupuytren’s contracture on www.HandCare.org.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

Random Fact: Stuck Ring

woman is taking off the wedding ring

Did you know? A stuck ring can be the result of joint arthritis, which can happen as your body changes over the years. Learn more about how to remove a stuck ring safely.

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Finger Hand Hand Surgeon Jammed Finger

Ask a Doctor: Jammed Finger

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. David J. Bozentka answers your questions about jammed fingers and what to do about them.

Why should I be concerned about my jammed finger?

A “jammed” finger is a common injury due to direct force to the tip of a finger.  The injury may occur during a variety of activities such as a thrown ball or a fall onto the hand.  It often leads to pain, swelling and the inability to move your finger well.  In general, a jammed finger means there is an injury to the middle joint of the finger, called the “proximal interphalangeal joint” (PIP joint).  Ligaments, tendons or bones can be involved.  Many people assume it will get better, so they delay treatment, but early treatment is important to prevent permanent stiffness and deformity in your finger.

What should I do if I have a jammed finger?

As with most joint injuries, you should initially rest, ice and elevate the finger to decrease swelling.  A finger splint can be used for comfort.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

How to safely use a snowblower

Snow being removed during winter storm using snow blower.

Hand surgeon Jay S. Talsania, MD discusses the dangers of using a snowblower in this new video. Snowblowers can cause serious injuries, most commonly sliced fingers! Learn how to avoid an injury and how to safely clean out a clogged snowblower with these tips from Dr. Talsania.

Watch the full video.

Read more about snowblower safety at www.HandCare.org.

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Finger Hand Nail Bed Injury

Nail Bed Injuries: Types, Causes and Treatment

Close up of man hand holding blank advertising card on white

Dr. Avery Arora with Michigan Surgery Specialists explains the causes of and treatment options for nailbed injuries.

The hand has a substantial number of bones, not to mention quite a few other important parts including ligaments, tendons, joints, the nails and the nail bed. An injury to the hand can cause damage to any and all of these locations. The nail and the nail bed are two of the areas that many people rarely consider when they think about injuries to their hand.

Types of Injuries to the Nail Bed

The most common type of nail injury is a crushing injury, which could happen to a single nail, or several at the same time depending on what happens. Dropping something heavy on the hand, and having it hit the nails or hitting the nail with a hammer while working are just two of the possible ways that you could have a crushing injury to the nail. It’s also possible to puncture the nail. Injuries to the nail bed could also mean there is damage to other parts of your finger and hand.

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Finger Hand Hand Therapy Mallet Finger

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Mallet Finger

Mallet_Fig1A

What is happening to my fingertip? It doesn’t go straight anymore.

If you can’t extend the tip of your finger, you may have what is called a mallet finger. This happens when the end of the tendon that lifts your fingertip becomes separated from the fingertip. There are a few different ways this can happen.

Do I need to do anything about this? Will it heal on its own?

If you have a mallet finger, it needs to be treated; it will not heal on its own. You should consult with your doctor, and possibly a hand surgeon.

A hand surgeon? That sounds serious!

It may be. Sometimes the tendon comes off the fingertip with a portion of the bone – sometimes it only comes partially off. Having a specialist assess it and direct you will ensure you have a good outcome.

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