Category : Finger

Finger Hand Hand Surgeon Jammed Finger

Ask a Doctor: Jammed Finger

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. David J. Bozentka answers your questions about jammed fingers and what to do about them.

Why should I be concerned about my jammed finger?

A “jammed” finger is a common injury due to direct force to the tip of a finger.  The injury may occur during a variety of activities such as a thrown ball or a fall onto the hand.  It often leads to pain, swelling and the inability to move your finger well.  In general, a jammed finger means there is an injury to the middle joint of the finger, called the “proximal interphalangeal joint” (PIP joint).  Ligaments, tendons or bones can be involved.  Many people assume it will get better, so they delay treatment, but early treatment is important to prevent permanent stiffness and deformity in your finger.

What should I do if I have a jammed finger?

As with most joint injuries, you should initially rest, ice and elevate the finger to decrease swelling.  A finger splint can be used for comfort.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

How to safely use a snowblower

Snow being removed during winter storm using snow blower.

Hand surgeon Jay S. Talsania, MD discusses the dangers of using a snowblower in this new video. Snowblowers can cause serious injuries, most commonly sliced fingers! Learn how to avoid an injury and how to safely clean out a clogged snowblower with these tips from Dr. Talsania.

Watch the full video.

Read more about snowblower safety at www.HandCare.org.

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Finger Hand Nail Bed Injury

Nail Bed Injuries: Types, Causes and Treatment

Close up of man hand holding blank advertising card on white

Dr. Avery Arora with Michigan Surgery Specialists explains the causes of and treatment options for nailbed injuries.

The hand has a substantial number of bones, not to mention quite a few other important parts including ligaments, tendons, joints, the nails and the nail bed. An injury to the hand can cause damage to any and all of these locations. The nail and the nail bed are two of the areas that many people rarely consider when they think about injuries to their hand.

Types of Injuries to the Nail Bed

The most common type of nail injury is a crushing injury, which could happen to a single nail, or several at the same time depending on what happens. Dropping something heavy on the hand, and having it hit the nails or hitting the nail with a hammer while working are just two of the possible ways that you could have a crushing injury to the nail. It’s also possible to puncture the nail. Injuries to the nail bed could also mean there is damage to other parts of your finger and hand.

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Finger Hand Hand Therapy Mallet Finger

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Mallet Finger

Mallet_Fig1A

What is happening to my fingertip? It doesn’t go straight anymore.

If you can’t extend the tip of your finger, you may have what is called a mallet finger. This happens when the end of the tendon that lifts your fingertip becomes separated from the fingertip. There are a few different ways this can happen.

Do I need to do anything about this? Will it heal on its own?

If you have a mallet finger, it needs to be treated; it will not heal on its own. You should consult with your doctor, and possibly a hand surgeon.

A hand surgeon? That sounds serious!

It may be. Sometimes the tendon comes off the fingertip with a portion of the bone – sometimes it only comes partially off. Having a specialist assess it and direct you will ensure you have a good outcome.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

How to remove a stuck ring

woman is taking off the wedding ring

Can’t get that ring off your finger? A stuck ring can be the result of a ring that’s too small, arthritic joints or swelling. Regardless of the reason, here is a safe way to remove it:

  1. Squirt some Windex – yes Windex – on the finger and ring. Or, use any lubricant such as soap or oil.
  2. Elevate the hand overhead for 5-10 minutes with ice around the ring and finger.
  3. Use dental floss or a thread to compress the swollen finger as shown:
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Cubital Tunnel Syndrome Finger Hand Nerves

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: Description, Symptoms and Treatment

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome is a condition that is caused by pressure or stretching of the ulnar nerve (the “funny bone”), which can cause you to feel numbness or tingling, pain and/or weakness in the hand and fingers. It can prevent you from performing daily tasks and affect you during the night.

This condition can be treated with simple activity modification, but surgery may be needed.

Watch this 3-minute video to learn more about Cubital Tunnel Syndrome, including possible symptoms and your treatment options. Visit www.HandCare.org to read about this condition in detail.

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Anatomy Bones Finger Hand

Anatomy 101: Finger Bones

Bones-Metacarpals_Index

Did you know that there are 27 bones in the hand and wrist? The hand is a very complex anatomical structure. Fingers, also known as phalanges, have three bones each. The finger bones, as shown in the figure above, are:

  1. Proximal phalanges: Above the metacarpals, below the knuckle
  2. Middle phalanges: Just above the knuckle
  3. Distal phalanges: At the fingertip

The thumb mimics the other fingers but does not have a middle phalanx. Metacarpals are hand bones that line up with the fingers. They give the hand its structure and serve as an attachment for many small muscles, tendons and ligaments in the hand.

Learn more about the bones of the fingers, hand and wrist on the anatomy page at www.HandCare.org.

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Finger Hand Hand Therapy Trigger Finger

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Trigger Finger

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I noticed that after making a fist, when I try to straighten one of my fingers, it catches and becomes very painful. Sometimes it is necessary to take my other hand to force the finger back into a straight position.

The condition you are describing may be trigger finger (or trigger thumb), and is frequently caused by overuse. Some examples of activities that might initiate this condition are power washing a deck for several hours, using a rivet gun repetitively, leash training a dog or opening window latches that have a lot of resistance.

Why is there a hard nodule present in my palm? It’s tender to touch!

The nodule is actually extreme thickening of the tendon, and each time your tendon “triggers,” there is an inflammatory response that occurs (see diagrams below). Look at the swollen tendon in the first diagram, then take a look at the pulley in the second diagram. You will see that at some point, the nodule becomes so inflamed the tendon can’t glide underneath the pulley — that’s why it “triggers.”

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