Category : Food

Food Hand Hand Therapy Knife Safety

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Kitchen Knife Safety

Serious hand injuries can occur during daily activities such as preparing food. Many hand injuries can be prevented with simple adjustments to routines. In preparation for the upcoming fall cooking season, please consider some safe, simple adjustments to your own routine in cutting various food items to prevent knife slips, which can cause injuries to the tendons or the nerves in your hand.

Mangoes

This delicious, yet slippery fruit can be a challenge when it comes to cutting and preparing for serving. The danger arises from removing the outside peel of the fruit. Once this is removed, the fruit center is extremely juicy and becomes difficult to hold. The fruit is also oval-shaped, difficult to place on a cutting board and has a large pit in the center.

Here’s a safe method for preparing mangoes:

  1. Keep the peel intact! Instead, stand the mango on a cutting board with stem side down and cut mango into two large pieces from either side of the pit. Be sure to cut toward a cutting board or solid surface and not the palm of your hand.
  2. Taking the two large pieces with peel side on cutting board, you can use a paring knife to cut cubes or slices of the mango, being sure not to cut through the peel. Again, be certain you are cutting toward a hard surface and not your hand.
  3. Once all your cuts are made, you can begin to peel away the skin of the mango by turning the skin inside out OR you can use a spoon (not anything sharp) and scoop the cut pieces away from the skin of the mango.
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Arthritis Food Hand

Can salt cause arthritis?

food, junk-food, cooking and unhealthy eating concept - close up of white salt cellar on wooden table

from The Paper

There’s a salt epidemic going on – according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the average American ingests up to double the recommended sodium intake every day. Not only is this bad news for those with high blood pressure, diabetes or kidney disease, but one local bone expert points out that too much salt can also exacerbate the most common hand issue Americans face: arthritis.

Currently, approximately twenty percent of the U.S. population suffers from arthritis – that’s more than 52 million people. Dr. Mark Ciaglia, the preeminent hand surgeon and owner of Woodlands Center for Special Surgery, has noted a trend in arthritis hitting younger age groups, thanks in large part to repetitive motion injuries caused by activities such as video gaming or intense school-level sports.

“People, depending on their health, should take in between 1500 to 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day; yet the average person eats about 3,400,” said Ciaglia. He points out a couple of reasons why this can lead to arthritis and other hand issues.

Read the full story.

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