Category : Fracture

Bones Fracture Hand Pediatrics

How to Know if Your Child Has a Broken Bone

It can be difficult to know if your child has a broken bone (also called a “fracture”), if they need emergency care or if they simply need at-home care. To complicate matters further, children need special care when they do break a bone because their bones are still growing and have a different consistency and quality than adult bones.

Children can break bones in a number of ways due to their constant activity and curiosity. They can fall, crush a finger in a door, touch dangerous machinery that they shouldn’t, get hit by a ball, etc.

Here are some important things to note if your child has an injury:

  • Bring your child to the emergency room if the finger, wrist, or arm is not in normal alignment or if there is a skin wound leading to the fracture.
  • Ice the injury if the injured body part looks normal and is movable, but keep an eye on your child’s symptoms.
  • If there is significant bruising or swelling, bring your child to see a hand surgeon as soon as possible. The finger, wrist or arm may be broken, but an x-ray is the only way to tell.
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Bones Fracture Hand Hand Therapy Radial Head Fracture

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Radial Head Fractures

The ability to move our elbows is required for using our arms during daily activities. We would not be able to reach our face to eat or our feet to put on shoes without our elbows.

Three bones make up the elbow: the long bone closer to your shoulder is the humerus, and the two forearm bones are the radius and ulna.  See the image above to get an idea of the location of these bones.

The radius and ulna are involved in bending and straightening the elbow as well as turning the palm up and down.  Radial head fractures affect all of these motions, especially the ability to rotate the forearm and hand.

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Bones Broken Arm Elbow Fracture Fracture Hand Fracture Shoulder Fracture

Random Fact: Broken Bone

Close-up of a young woman's hand in plaster.

Did you know? Just because you can move a body part doesn’t mean a bone isn’t broken. Learn more about the signs of a broken bone in the hand, arm, elbow and shoulder.

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Arm Bones Broken Arm Fracture

How to know if you have a broken arm

Close-up of a young woman's hand in plaster.

It can sometimes be hard to tell the difference between a broken bone, also known as a fracture, and simply a sprain or other injury. Here are six signs that may mean you have a broken arm:

  1. Arm looks crooked
  2. Bruising
  3. Pain
  4. Swelling
  5. Arm is difficult to move
  6. Arm feels numb or tingly

Visit a hand surgeon if any of these symptoms are true. Any deep cuts that may have occurred during your injury should also be checked immediately since there is a risk of infection. Your hand surgeon or emergency doctor may treat you with a cast or recommend surgery.

Read more about broken arm injuries at www.HandCare.org.

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Fracture Hand Sprain

Sprains, Fractures and Other Injuries on Pinterest

Check out the Sprains, Fractures and Other Injuries board on the Hand Society’s Pinterest page for information, images and videos on treatment options for your upper extremity injury.

Follow ASSH’s board Sprains, Fractures and Other Injuries on Pinterest.

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Broken Finger Finger Fracture Hand

Ask a Doctor: Broken Finger

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. John Erickson explains when to visit a doctor for a broken finger.

If you recently injured your finger and are wondering if it is broken, the best thing to do is get an x-ray to find out. You can get x-rays in your physician’s office, urgent care, or local emergency room. Many breaks or fractures in the fingers can be misdiagnosed as “just a sprain” or a “jammed finger.” If a finger fracture is not treated appropriately, the long-term results may not be good. I have heard from many patients “I could still move it, so I didn’t think it was broken.” In many cases, a fracture causes the finger to be stiff and difficult to move; however, this is not true in all cases. When in doubt, get it checked out.

The signs of a broken finger are:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Stiffness
  • Numbness
  • Pain with range of motion
  • Deformity
  • Skin lacerations
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Finger Fracture Hand Pediatrics Wrist

Random Fact: Playground Injuries

Happy friends having fun on playground

Each year, more than 200,000 children visit the emergency room from an injury on the playground. Learn more about finger, wrist and hand fractures in children, common playground injuries.

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Anatomy Fracture Hand Wrist

Anatomy 101: Wrist Bones

Bones-Wrist-Scaphoid

The wrist bones and hand bones give you the support and flexibility needed to move your hand in all different ways and control objects of all shapes and sizes. There are eight bones in the wrist:

  1. Scaphoid
  2. Lunate
  3. Triquetrum
  4. Trapezoid
  5. Trapezium
  6. Capitate
  7. Hamate

The scaphoid bone is the most commonly injured wrist bone, typically resulting in a scaphoid fracture.

Learn more about the bones of the wrist with the interactive anatomy tool from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.

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