Category : Hand Conditions

Hand Hand Conditions Hand Pain Hand Therapy

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Hand Edema

Hand edema is inflammation, swelling or fluid collection in the hand. Sounds basic by definition; however, edema in the hand can be extremely problematic and complex when there is a hand condition or injury.

Edema is the body’s response to healing itself, but, in the hand, large amounts and/or long-term swelling can cause permanent impairment and affect one’s ability to perform daily activities. It is one of the most common problems associated with hand injuries/conditions. Edema can be a primary focus during hand therapy as it can trigger so many other problems such as pain, lack of motion, scar tissue and decreased function of the hand and arm.

Edema can be acute in nature, which means it occurs in the first 24-48 hours after an injury or condition, or chronic (present 48-72 hours or longer after injury). Signs of acute hand edema are typically:

  • Redness
  • Warmth
  • Throbbing
  • Swelling
  • Decreased mobility and use
  • Tingling
  • Numbness
  • Pain

Chronic hand edema can be hard or soft and, typically is not warm, red or throbbing; however, it can be painful and cause scarring and/or decreased function.

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Hand Hand Conditions Hand Pain

Best Ways to Cope With Hand Pain

from Harvard Health Letter

Hand pain becomes common as we get older. Tingling and numbness, aching or locking joints, and difficulty grasping objects are frequent complaints. But don’t make your own diagnosis and suffer in silence. “It’s difficult to discern between different types of hand pain. Some have overlapping symptoms,” says Dr. Sang-Gil Lee, a hand surgeon at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital.

Dr. Lee advises that you seek treatment as soon as possible for persistent hand pain, before it gets so advanced that it’s tough to use your hands for even the simplest jobs, like brushing your teeth or buttoning a shirt.

The following are common types of hand pain and their treatments.

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the wearing away of cartilage in the joints. Any joint is susceptible. However, in the fingers, it’s typically the last joint before the fingernail that’s affected. On the thumb, it’s usually the joint at the base of the hand. Symptoms include stiffness and pain that goes away with rest. “What causes pain is the restriction of gliding motion. It causes inflammation,” explains Dr. Lee. To diagnose osteoarthritis, your doctor may order an x-ray to look at the bones.

Read the full story.

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Espanol Hand Hand Conditions

5 Common Hand Conditions (in Español) / 5 Condiciones comunes de la mano

Did you know that the American Society for Surgery of the Hand provides online information on 20 different hand and upper extremity conditions in Spanish? Here are some of our most popular conditions in Spanish:

  1. Artritis de la base del pulgar (thumb arthritis): La artritis en la base del pulgar es una predisposición genética: al igual que las canas y el afinamiento del pelo, aparece con la edad y surge más temprano en algunas familias.  A diferencia del afinamiento del cabello, las mujeres tienden a padecer artritis del pulgar antes que los hombres.
  2. Dedo en gatillo (trigger finger): La tendosinovitis estenosante, comúnmente conocida como “dedo en gatillo” o “pulgar en gatillo”, afecta los tendones y poleas de la mano que flexionan los dedos.
  3. Quistes sinoviales (ganglion cysts): Los quistes sinoviales (o “gangliones”) son bultos muy comunes en la mano y la muñeca que aparecen junto a articulaciones o tendones.  Los lugares más comunes son la parte de arriba de la muñeca, el lado de la palma de la muñeca, la base de los dedos del lado de la palma y la parte superior de la articulación que está más cerca de la punta de los dedos.
  4. Síndrome del túnel carpiano (carpal tunnel syndrome): El síndrome del túnel carpiano (STC) es una afección que surge debido al aumento de la presión sobre el nervio medo en la muñeca. En efecto, es un nervio pellizcado en la muñeca.
  5. Epicondilitis lateral (tennis elbow): La epicondilitis lateral, en general conocida como codo de tenista, es una afección dolorosa de los tendones que se unen al hueso en la parte externa (lateral) del codo.

For additional topics in Spanish, visit www.HandCare.org.

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