Category : Hand Safety

Hand Hand Safety

8 snowblower safety tips

Snowblower Safety v2

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

How to remove a stuck ring

woman is taking off the wedding ring

Can’t get that ring off your finger? A stuck ring can be the result of a ring that’s too small, arthritic joints or swelling. Regardless of the reason, here is a safe way to remove it:

  1. Squirt some Windex – yes Windex – on the finger and ring. Or, use any lubricant such as soap or oil.
  2. Elevate the hand overhead for 5-10 minutes with ice around the ring and finger.
  3. Use dental floss or a thread to compress the swollen finger as shown:
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Arthritis Hand Hand Safety Hand Surgeon

Advice from a doctor on avoiding hand injuries during the holidays

cooking and home concept - close up of male hand cutting tomato on cutting board with sharp knife

from the Sun Sentinel

Longtime West Boca Medical Center and private practice hand surgeon Dr. Michael Joyner sees his share of holiday mishaps – cutting holiday appetizers or prepping dinner with arthritis or using too sharp a knife – and has sage advice on how to ward off hand injuries.

What has arthritis got to do with food preparation?

They don’t have a good hold or grip. A lot of times, they’ll get a cut or laceration. In the hand, it doesn’t bleed so much, but may a hit a nerve. Many times they’ll have a constant numbness or tingling.

Does it get worse?

The longer you wait, the less likely it will be repaired.

What should people do if this happens to them?

I would follow up with a hand surgeon and be evaluated in a timely fashion. That can make a difference in your treatment plan.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

5 turkey carving safety tips

Turkey Carving Safety FINAL

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Finger Hand Hand Safety Hand Therapy

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Pumpkin Carving Tools

pile of small cute pumpkins at pumpkin patch

Are pumpkin-carving tools really worth buying? 

Yes, there has been real research on this topic. Dr. Alexander Marcus and his research group in Syracuse, N.Y. tested the performance of two different pumpkin carving tools against a serrated and a plain kitchen knife*. They tested the pressure it takes to cut or puncture a pumpkin with each of the knives and the pumpkin-carving tools. They then used the same pressure against the fingers of cadavers. The pumpkin-carving tools proved to be far superior and safer. The plain kitchen knife caused more injuries than the serrated kitchen knife. Both kitchen knives cut through both the tendons of the finger and, in some cases, a nerve as well. Kitchen knives require more force to puncture a pumpkin, meaning more opportunity for injury.

You can feel confident that investing in pumpkin-carving gadgets is a good idea. If you are interested in seeing the article along with pictures of the test, please be advised that there is a photo of a cadaver hand: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743504000374.

Here are some safe and creative ways to decorate your pumpkin this year:

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

5 Pumpkin Carving Safety Tips

Pumpkin Carving Tips FINAL

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Hand Hand Safety Power Saws

10 power saw safety tips

Power Saw Injuries v2

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Fireworks Hand Hand Safety

12 fireworks safety tips

Fireworks FINAL

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