Category : Hand Surgeon

Casts and Splints Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery Hand Therapy

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: What are my surgery precautions and why do I have to follow them?

You just completed your visit with your physician. He/she has likely given you a list of dos and don’ts after your injury or surgery. How important is it to follow these rules?  What could happen if these precautions are not followed?  What are the long-term effects of doing too much of a good thing or doing the wrong thing?

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Fireworks Hand Safety Hand Surgeon

5 Fireworks Tips from a Hand Surgeon

Fireworks are a fascinating and fun part of holiday celebrations throughout the country. Unfortunately, this popular tradition is also associated with injuries that are all too common among both adults and children. Each year, it is estimated that over 10,000 fireworks-related injuries occur in the United States and at least 40% of these injuries involve the arm, hand, and fingers.

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Hand Surgeon PA Physician Assistant

What is a PA?

Lauren B. Grossman, MD answers your questions about physician assistants, also known as PAs.

What is a PA?

A PA is a physician assistant, a health care professional who is credentialed to practice medicine with physician supervision. There are more than 123,000 PAs who practice in every medical setting in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

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Arthritis Hand Surgeon Rheumatoid Arthritis

Ask a Doctor: Rheumatoid Arthritis

Hand surgeon Mark Joseph Yuhas, MD answers your questions about rheumatoid arthritis.

What is arthritis? Can it affect the hand and wrist just the same as other joints such as the hip and knee?

Arthritis is a term that is used to describe pain and stiffness in a joint. A joint is a location in the body where two bones articulate, or move. Typically these joints have cartilage, a type of material in the body that is smooth and helps the joint to move without pain or restriction.

Arthritis involves a process where the cartilage is no longer smooth and begins to “break down”.  This can result in pain, swelling, and loss of motion in many joints in the body including the fingers, hand, and wrist.

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Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery Surgery

Ask a Doctor: Preparing for Hand Surgery

Hand surgeon David Friedman, MD, FACS, answers your questions about preparing for an upcoming hand surgery.

1. Will I need medical clearance before surgery? What other tests might I need? 

Medical clearance may require a visit to your primary care physician and/or a specialist like a cardiologist or pulmonologist.  Whether or not you require medical clearance depends on many factors including your age, medical history, and the type of surgery and anesthesia you are having.  You may require blood work, an EKG, and/or a chest X-ray.  For some types of surgery and depending upon your age and health status, no pre-operative clearance or testing may be needed.

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Arm Hand Surgeon Shoulder

Arm and Shoulder Injuries: A Q&A with Orthopedic Surgeon Matthew Meunier, MD

from UC San Diego Health

Millions of people in the United States break a bone each year, about half of which affect the arm. At the same time, approximately two million people visit their doctors for a rotator cuff problem, and osteoarthritis is the most frequent cause of disability in the nation.

Matthew Meunier, MD, sees it all. He’s an orthopedic surgeon at UC San Diego Health and associate team physician for the San Diego Padres, specializing in hand, upper extremity and microvascular surgery. In this Q&A, Meunier discusses the types of issues he treats, and how people can prevent and seek help for these conditions.

Read the full story.

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Hand Pain Hand Surgeon Numbness

Why Are My Hands Numb?

There can be many different causes for numb hands. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, which is a condition involving a pinched nerve in the wrist, is one of the most common reasons. Typically, with this condition, you’ll feel numbness or tingling in thumb, index, middle and ring fingers.

Here are five other reasons your hands may be numb:

  1. Compression Neuropathy: This means there is pressure on a nerve, which can happen from an injury or other medical condition. In addition to numbness, it can cause weak or twitchy muscles. The location of the compressed nerve can vary, resulting in a variety of different symptoms. Learn more.
  2. Peripheral Neuropathy: This condition can commonly occur in people with diabetes, alcoholics, older individuals or individuals who were poisoned from metals or industrial compounds. It typically causes constant numbness in a general area.
  3. Fibromyalgia: This is a disorder that causes pain all over the body. People with this condition can be more likely than others to develop Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, which in turn may cause numb hands.
  4. Myofascial Pain Syndrome: This condition can be similar to Fibromyalgia. While the symptoms of pain are typically in the neck and shoulder, it can also cause numb hands and forearms.
  5. Medications: Cancer treatment drugs are an example of medication that can cause numbness and tingling in the hands.
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Elbow Hand Surgeon Lumps and Bumps Olecranon Bursitis

Ask a Doctor: Olecranon Bursitis

Hand surgeon Steven H. Goldberg, MD explains olecranon bursitis:

Olecranon bursitis is a common problem that causes pain and swelling near the point of the elbow.  There are several causes of olecranon bursitis.  In some people we never know what causes this problem.  In other people it can begin with trauma or injury to the area. Blood can fill the area, inflammation can occur, or infection can cause the problem. Infections can be either sudden or can slowly grow and become very long lasting. Depending on the cause of the bursitis, the treatment may vary considerably and may just include observation or could require surgery to clean the area.

The olecranon is the pointy part of your elbow. The olecranon bursa is one of many bursas in your body.  A bursa is a type of tissue below the skin that produces fluid and helps the skin or deeper tissues move across areas where a lot of motion occurs. The olecranon bursa, for example, helps the skin slide over the olecranon as you bend or straighten the elbow.  Other areas where there are bursae include the subacromial and subdeltoid (shoulder) bursa, the greater trochanteric (hip) bursa, and the prepatellar (knee) bursa.  Bursitis can occur at any of these areas.

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