Category : Hand Surgeon

Hand Hand Surgeon Tendon Injuries Tendons

Ask a Doctor: Tendon Injuries

Hand surgeon David J. Bozentka, MD answers your questions about tendon injuries.

What is a tendon?

A tendon is a cord-like structure that attaches a muscle to a bone.  The muscles that allow you to bend and straighten your fingers start in the forearm, and the tendons attach the muscles to your fingers and wrist.  The tendons on the palm side of the hand that bend the fingers and wrist are called flexor tendons.  The tendons on the back side of the hand and wrist are termed extensor tendons.

How do I know that I have a tendon injury?  

Difficulty in fully bending or straightening your finger or wrist after an injury may be related to damage to a tendon.  Lacerations (cuts) to the hand, wrist or forearm are some of the more common reasons you can injure a tendon.  In addition, an injury without an open wound can cause a tendon to pull away from a bone called an avulsion injury.  A Jersey Finger is a term used for a flexor tendon avulsion injury most commonly occurring in the ring finger.  A player that grabs another player’s jersey that is pulled away can avulse a flexor tendon, causing inability to bend the tip joint of the finger.  Alternatively, a Mallet Finger involves an avulsion injury of the extensor tendon leading to a droop of the tip joint of the involved digit.

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Elbow Hand Hand Pain Hand Surgeon Wrist

Pain in Your Hand, Wrist or Elbow? When to Seek Help

from the Cleveland Clinic

Pain is your body’s way of telling you something is wrong. But it doesn’t always tell you if you need medical treatment. So when pain develops in your hand, wrist or elbow, how do you know whether to treat it at home or see a doctor?

Orthopedic surgeon William Seitz, Jr., MD, who specializes in upper extremity problems, says if something is seriously wrong, you’ll know it.

A wrist fracture, for instance, will cause pain you can’t ignore. “When the pain is so bad you can’t move past it, call your doctor or head to the emergency department,” he says. If you don’t have that level of pain, then listen to your body. Take a moment to consider why you might be feeling pain and what it can tell you.

Read the full story.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

Best Hand Surgeons in the U.S.

The American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) includes a membership of more than 3,800 prestigious hand surgeons in the United States and around the world. Hand surgeon members of ASSH are required to meet rigorous standards. They are required to:

  • Pass the Certification in the Subspecialty of Surgery of the Hand, a difficult exam that tests their hand surgery knowledge
  • Be certified in general, orthopaedic or plastic surgery by their Board
  • Be of high moral, ethical and professional standing
  • Have made worthwhile contributions in areas of hand surgery
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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery Wide Awake Surgery

Video: Wide Awake Surgery


During wide awake surgery, rather than being put asleep, you are only numbed in the area of the body on which surgery is being performed. You will be awake during the procedure. But, don’t worry, you won’t be able to see the procedure being performed. There will be a blue sheet blocking your view. For example, if you are having a hand surgery, only your hand/arm will be numbed. This procedure is fully sterile as a normal surgery is.

Watch our short, 3-minute video above to hear from a surgeon and patient about wide awake surgery. Or, keep reading to learn about the benefits of wide awake surgery.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Steroid Injection

Ask a Doctor: Steroid Injections

Hand surgeon Steven Goldberg, MD, answers your questions about steroid injections.


Steroid injections are a common non-operative treatment for multiple musculoskeletal conditions. The following are a list of some conditions where steroid injections may be recommended:

 

How do steroids work?

There are different types of steroids. Glucocorticoid steroids are the ones used to treat the musculoskeletal problems listed above. There are many different types of steroids that have different onsets of action, duration, solubility, and reasons for use. Any single medication may be used at different doses and volumes depending on the clinical problem. There is no single steroid regimen that is “best”. They have different effects on many different types of tissue, but they may work to reduce inflammation and change the array of proteins that cells make.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

Find a Hand Surgeon Near You

Need a hand surgeon? We have more than 3,000 for you in the Find a Hand Surgeon tool by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH). Our tool, powered by Google Maps, allows you to search by city, state, zip code or doctor all around the world.

Here’s what else you should know about our tool:

  • Our database is limited to surgeon members of ASSH, which means they’ve completed a rigorous application process, demonstrating high moral, ethical and professional standing in hand surgery.
  • All of the surgeons in our database are either board-certified or on track to become board-certified.
  • Our tool will provide you with a photo, office address, website and phone number of each surgeon.
  • You can pinpoint each surgeon on our map, powered by Google.

Search for a hand surgeon today. Learn more about hand surgery and what a hand surgeon does by visiting www.HandCare.org, the patient site from ASSH.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery Leprosy

The Art of Surgery: Life Drawing and Leprosy

from The Guardian

“Life drawing”, “still life” and “life class” are all fairly mundane terms I thought only applied to nude figures or fruit bowls in an art studio. However, in November, I stood and drew in the corner of a plastic surgeon’s theatre in Lalgadh hospital, near Janakpur in Nepal. The theatre was set up to operate on the paralysed hands of leprosy patients. “Life drawing” became very appropriate very quickly.

Like many infectious diseases that predominantly affect those in poverty, leprosy is alive and well; there were more than 200,000 new cases were reported in 2015. The sad fact is that the disease is difficult to contract and relatively straightforward to treat. Many patients present late, when paralysis sets in. Although medication can make patients non-infective, the paralysis requires surgery to correct.

Each year, Working Hands – a Bristol-based charity run by hand surgeon Donald Sammut – spends two weeks, pro bono, operating on the backlog of patients in Lalgadh, training staff and providing hundreds of kilos of medical equipment and consumables. The work is highly skilled, but in many cases the objective is simple: to generate enough movement and power in a hand for the patient to go back to work, or to eat, or to look after themselves in a society where stigma is attached to those with the disease. Most of these patients are illiterate farmers whose only means of support depends on how much they can dig, or carry.

Read the full story.

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Arthroscopy Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

What is Arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that allows a surgeon to look inside your joint by inserting a small tool (about the width of a pencil) into a small cut. You will be under general or regional anesthesia during this surgery. A fiberoptic camera will be inserted into the joint, and the video will be projected on a screen for the surgeon to view. The surgeon may make several small cuts around your elbow to see different areas.

Knee and shoulder arthroscopy are common procedures, but arthroscopy can also be used for both the elbow and wrist. The wrist is the third most common joint to undergo arthroscopy.

Wrist Arthroscopy

This procedure may be performed on the wrist if you are experiencing pain, a clicking noise or swelling. These symptoms usually arise from an injury and usually mean there is an internal problem with the wrist.

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