Category : Hand Surgeon

Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

What is Office-Based Hand Surgery?

Male doctor talking with patient seriously at clinic. Close-up.

from Fox 17 West Michigan

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — Hands and wrists are subject to a variety of problems that result in pain, weakness or numbness. Thanks to a new technique, three doctors in Grand Rapids are fixing those problems quicker — and cheaper — than ever before.

It’s called office-based hand surgery, and during the procedure, the patient is wide awake.

Normally, if you have carpal tunnel syndrome, which causes numbness, tingling, or weakness in the hand, you would go to a hospital, undergo a number of tests, get put under anesthesia, and pay thousands of dollars for treatment.

Office-based hand surgery is not only cheaper, it’s safer and saves time.

Ryan Ganzevoort underwent hand surgery two weeks ago at Spectrum Health Medical Group. When he found the procedure took less than 10 minutes in the doctor’s office, it was a no-brainer, he says.

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ASSH Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

How to search for a hand surgeon

FAHS screen shot_New York

The Find a Hand Surgeon search tool on www.HandCare.org is the best way to find the top hand surgeons in the U.S. and overseas. This tool includes thousands of surgeons, all of whom are members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, the oldest and most prestigious hand surgery society. All of our active surgeon members are board-certified. Search by location (city or state or zip code) or search for a specific doctor that you may be familiar with. You can view the results on a Google map to see which surgeons are near you.

Why visit a hand surgeon?

Hand surgeons do much more than perform surgery. They can treat you for minor injuries such as a sprained wrist or jammed finger, or give you options for conditions such as carpal tunnel or trigger finger. Even if you’re simply experiencing pain in your hands, visiting a hand surgeon is the best option.

Visit www.HandCare.org to learn about conditions and injuries of the upper extremity.

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Finger Hand Hand Surgeon Jammed Finger

Ask a Doctor: Jammed Finger

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. David J. Bozentka answers your questions about jammed fingers and what to do about them.

Why should I be concerned about my jammed finger?

A “jammed” finger is a common injury due to direct force to the tip of a finger.  The injury may occur during a variety of activities such as a thrown ball or a fall onto the hand.  It often leads to pain, swelling and the inability to move your finger well.  In general, a jammed finger means there is an injury to the middle joint of the finger, called the “proximal interphalangeal joint” (PIP joint).  Ligaments, tendons or bones can be involved.  Many people assume it will get better, so they delay treatment, but early treatment is important to prevent permanent stiffness and deformity in your finger.

What should I do if I have a jammed finger?

As with most joint injuries, you should initially rest, ice and elevate the finger to decrease swelling.  A finger splint can be used for comfort.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

What to expect at a hand surgery consultation

Male doctor talking with patient seriously at clinic. Close-up.

Dr. Avery Arora, MD discusses what a hand surgeon may ask you if you are considering surgery and what questions you should ask your hand surgeon.


When you go in for a hand surgery consultation, it is extremely important for the patient to be honest and open with the doctor regarding their health. While the exact questions may differ depending on the type of procedure and the reason for the procedure, the types of questions will generally have a number of similarities.

What types of questions will the doctor ask?

For example, the doctor will want to know if you have any other medical conditions, if you are going through any other medical treatments at the time, and if you have ever had any other surgeries. They want to know if you have any known drug allergies, as well as what medications you may be taking currently. They need to make sure that there is nothing that will interfere with the surgery. In addition to prescription and over the counter drugs, you need to let them know about tobacco use, alcohol and other drugs, as these could have an effect on whether you are a good candidate for surgery or not.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Surgery

How to prepare for surgery

Preparing for Surgery v1

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Hand Hand Surgeon Ski and Snowboard Injury Sports Injury

Q&A on winter sports injuries with Dr. James Monica

Man Clearing Snow From Path With Shovel

from My Central Jersey

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that about 1 million Americans are injured and 17,000 people die as a result of slip and fall injuries every year.

These injuries increase significantly during the winter season. In fact, about 450,000 people are treated annually for winter sports-related injuries. What’s more, snowboarding tops the list of accident-related winter activities.

Dr. James Monica, a board certified orthopaedist and member of University Orthopaedic Associates (UOA), knows this firsthand. He deals with winter injuries and treats a substantial number of fractures from sports and accidents.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Therapy

What is a hand therapist?

What is a Hand Therapist FINAL FINAL

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Hand Hand Surgeon

7 Myths About Your Hands

Doctor's hand holding a wrinkled elderly hand

from Everyday Health

By Glenn D. Cohen, MD, Special to Everyday Health

People all over the world of various cultures, religions, and nationalities use their hands to greet one another, communicate through sign language, hold their babies, do work, and more. Hands are a universal part of our humanity, and the hand is one of the most vital parts of the body. Here’s proof: One-fourth of the motor cortex in the brain is dedicated to controlling muscles in your hands. Yet what I’ve learned as a hand surgeon is that many people don’t know a lot about their hands. Here are some hand misconceptions I’ve encountered over the years.

Myth No. 1: If You Can Move Your Finger, Wrist, or Elbow, It Isn’t Broken

Recently, I treated a tough young defensive end who was sure his finger wasn’t broken because he could move it. He insisted on getting back in the game. “Just because you can move it doesn’t mean it’s not broken,” I told him. Only a doctor, using an X-ray, can make the definitive call.

In high school football, the hand is the most commonly fractured body part, according to a study published in 2012 in The American Journal of Sports Medicine. More than 150,000 football players under age 15 seek treatment for injuries each year, and one out of every seven of those injuries are to the hand, finger, or wrist.

Read the full story at Everyday Health.

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