Category : Hand Surgery

Hand Surgery Joint Pain Joint Replacement Joints

What is Joint Replacement Surgery?

Joint replacement surgery is a procedure in which bone and structures that line the joint are removed and replaced with new parts. This procedure is necessary when the articular cartilage (the substance on the surface of a bone) wears out or is damaged, which means the bones will no longer glide smoothly against one another. It may also stem from abnormal joint fluid.

The new parts may be made of metal, plastic, or materials that are carbon-coated. They allow the joints to move again without pain, increase range of motion, and can improve the look of the joints. Finger joints, knuckle joints, and wrist joints are commonly replaced.

After joint replacement surgery, you will most likely work with a hand therapist and could possibly wear a splint. However, with this procedure, there are always risks. There could be an infection, or the implant could fail, causing more joint pain. The implant could also wear out over time, resulting in the need for another surgery. In addition, vessels, nerves or other structures near the surgery site could be damaged. Talk to your doctor about the risks of joint replacement surgery before agreeing to the procedure.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery Leprosy

The Art of Surgery: Life Drawing and Leprosy

from The Guardian

“Life drawing”, “still life” and “life class” are all fairly mundane terms I thought only applied to nude figures or fruit bowls in an art studio. However, in November, I stood and drew in the corner of a plastic surgeon’s theatre in Lalgadh hospital, near Janakpur in Nepal. The theatre was set up to operate on the paralysed hands of leprosy patients. “Life drawing” became very appropriate very quickly.

Like many infectious diseases that predominantly affect those in poverty, leprosy is alive and well; there were more than 200,000 new cases were reported in 2015. The sad fact is that the disease is difficult to contract and relatively straightforward to treat. Many patients present late, when paralysis sets in. Although medication can make patients non-infective, the paralysis requires surgery to correct.

Each year, Working Hands – a Bristol-based charity run by hand surgeon Donald Sammut – spends two weeks, pro bono, operating on the backlog of patients in Lalgadh, training staff and providing hundreds of kilos of medical equipment and consumables. The work is highly skilled, but in many cases the objective is simple: to generate enough movement and power in a hand for the patient to go back to work, or to eat, or to look after themselves in a society where stigma is attached to those with the disease. Most of these patients are illiterate farmers whose only means of support depends on how much they can dig, or carry.

Read the full story.

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Arthroscopy Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

What is Arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that allows a surgeon to look inside your joint by inserting a small tool (about the width of a pencil) into a small cut. You will be under general or regional anesthesia during this surgery. A fiberoptic camera will be inserted into the joint, and the video will be projected on a screen for the surgeon to view. The surgeon may make several small cuts around your elbow to see different areas.

Knee and shoulder arthroscopy are common procedures, but arthroscopy can also be used for both the elbow and wrist. The wrist is the third most common joint to undergo arthroscopy.

Wrist Arthroscopy

This procedure may be performed on the wrist if you are experiencing pain, a clicking noise or swelling. These symptoms usually arise from an injury and usually mean there is an internal problem with the wrist.

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Hand Hand Surgery Therapy Dog

Making the rounds: Therapy dogs team up with hand surgeon to comfort patients

from the Chicago Tribune

When Ceil Johnson fell on the ice and broke her wrist last month, she went to hand surgeon Leon Benson for treatment.

Benson had taken care of her before, but that didn’t mean she wasn’t nervous when the doctor, who practices in Wilmette and Glenview, removed the staples in her arm a few weeks later. But Johnson had a companion to help steady her as Benson carefully removed each staple: Benson’s Portuguese water dog, Cooper.

Cooper sat patiently on the exam table beside Johnson, letting her put her arms around him and bury her face in his glossy black side until the doctor’s work was completed.

Johnson, who has dogs herself, said she was glad Cooper had been there for her.

“I’m not a kid about stuff like this, but without Cooper there, it would have felt a lot worse,” she said.

Benson, who is affiliated with both the NorthShore Orthopaedic Institute and the Illinois Bone and Joint Institute, is used to that kind of response to 7-year-old Cooper, and to Chelsea, Cooper’s 11-year-old Portuguese water dog colleague. That’s exactly the reason he brings one or both of them in to see patients.

Read the full story.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

Video: Preparing for Surgery


Surgery can be a scary thing. Not only does it mean your body will be undergoing a procedure, but it also requires taking time off work, receiving help at home and coordinating transportation to and from surgery. Despite these obstacles, surgeon members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand will ensure that your surgical experience is a good one. Your hand surgeon wants the best outcome for you.

To achieve the best outcome, your surgeon will be well prepared prior to your surgery. Reviewing the procedure with you is just one way your doctor will prepare. Watch our short, 1-minute video above to learn more about preparing for surgery.

Visit www.HandCare.org to read about different hand surgeries and how a hand surgeon can help you.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Hand Surgery

Random Fact: Recovering from Carpal Tunnel Surgery

technology, home and lifestyle concept - close up of man working with laptop computer and sitting on sofa at home

Did you know? After carpal tunnel surgery, you can begin using a keyboard again within two weeks. Now that’s a fast recovery! Learn more about Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and how it’s treated.

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Hand Hand Surgery Scars

Surgical Scar Tissue: A Less-Talked-About Side Effect

Vector medical concept Surgeons in operation theater. Room with people, scalpel and screen disease and pulse patient, assistant doctor illustration. Team doctors in the operating room with the patient

from US News & World Report

When the short-term effects of surgery – such as oozing wounds and incision pain – have long faded, an unseen complication may be lurking beneath the skin. Excess scar tissue, layers deep, can significantly reduce function and movement months after surgery. And on the skin’s surface, visible, lingering scars might be noticeable enough to really bother patients. Before you undergo surgery, here’s what to know about reducing scarring as you heal.

Bend and straighten your elbow. The folds that form in your skin, known as Langer’s lines, represent the direction and orientation of the collagen fibers, similar to the grain of wood, says Dr. Robert Klapper, director of the Joint Replacement Program in Orthopaedic Surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. During surgery, it’s not always possible for surgeons to cut parallel to the grain with their scalpels.

“If you are not able, because of heart surgery for example, to get down to the sternum, we as surgeons have to violate the Langer’s line,” Klapper says. “This can often lead to keloids and bumps and poor healing, and extra scar tissue can take place.”

Performing joint surgery, Klapper says, involves cutting into multiple layers of anatomy: the epidermis or skin surface; subcutaneous fat; fascia or connective tissue; muscles, tendons and ligaments; and the lining around the bone called the ostium. “It’s kind of like a seven-layer cake, if you will,” he says. “As a surgeon, you must respect in your repair of the surgery all layers of the seven-layer cake. All should get closed properly.”

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

What Can a Hand Surgeon Do?

Portrait Of Medical Team Standing In Hospital Corridor

Most hand surgeons can treat more than just the hand. They can also treat your shoulder, elbow, arm and wrist. A hand surgeon can also provide a variety of treatments that do not include surgery. They can help you find a hand therapist to reduce your pain, or they can recommend other options such as splints or injections. Hand surgeons can see you for an injury, such as a broken bone, dislocation or jammed finger, for general pain, or for a condition such as:

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Arthritis
  • Trigger finger
  • Tennis elbow
  • Etc.

Use our Find a Hand Surgeon tool to find a specialist in your area. Our tool includes more than 3,000 board-certified hand surgeons, both orthopaedic and plastic surgeons, who are members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Watch our short video to learn more about hand surgery:

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