Category : Hand

Hand Ligament Wrist Wrist Sprain

How to Know if You Have a Sprained Wrist


The wrist is often injured, and there are many different types of injuries you could sustain including a sprained wrist, wrist fracture, ligament tear, etc. Most often, a sprained wrist takes place because of a fall or sudden twisting motion of the wrist. It can sometimes be hard to tell how severe your wrist injury is because many of these injuries have similar symptoms. A sprained wrist means that you’ve either stretched or torn a ligament. Ligaments are what connect the many bones in your wrist.

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Congenital Finger Hand Syndactyly

What is Syndactyly?

Hand surgeon Reena Anjalie Bhatt, MD answers your questions about webbed fingers, also known as syndactyly.

What is syndactyly?

Syndactyly is a condition in which a child is born with two fused fingers or toes. This can occur in the hands or the feet or both. It can occur in one hand or foot, or all four. Syndactyly is the most common congenital malformation of the limbs.

Most commonly, the fused fingers or toes are joined by soft tissue, this is termed simple syndactyly. When adjacent finger bones are fused as well as the soft tissue, this is termed complex syndactyly. When fingers are fused all the way to the fingertips, this is termed complete, whereas fusion that occurs only partway across the webspace is termed incomplete. Syndactyly can occur as part of a syndrome. Complex syndactyly with bony fusion more commonly occurs with with a syndrome. Apert syndrome and Poland syndrome are two examples of syndromes with syndactyly association.

Syndactyly can occur sporadically or be inherited and occurs in 1 out of 2,000 births. In 15-40% of patients there is a family history.

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Hand Hand Tumor Lumps and Bumps

4 Common Types of Hand Tumors

Hand tumors and wrist tumors can come in all shapes and sizes. Sometimes, it may just look like an ordinary lump or bump. And while it may technically be a tumor, the tumor is not necessarily cancerous. There are many different types of hand tumors, and most are benign, which means non-cancerous. Hand tumors can be something as common as a wart or a mole, which are on top of the skin, or something more uncommon that is beneath the skin. Here are some examples of common hand tumors:

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Hand Wrist Wrist Fracture

5 Signs of a Wrist Fracture

The wrist is a part of the body that is injured frequently, and these injuries may result in pain, a sprained wrist or even a wrist fracture. A wrist fracture is a medical term for a broken wrist, which means you’ve broken one or more of the many bones in your wrist. There are eight wrist bones which are connected to the forearm bones called the radius and the ulna. The radius is the most common bone to break in the wrist. This injury typically happens from falling on an outstretched hand, but it can also result from traumatic events such as a car accident.

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Elbow Elbow Fracture Hand

6 Signs of an Elbow Fracture

A young woman touching her painful elbow

Our elbows are vital to some of the daily tasks we perform, including things like washing your face, picking up objects, or anything that requires you to turn your palm up or down. Each year, many people suffer from an elbow fracture, which is another term for a broken elbow. Elbow fractures can result from a fall, a direct blow to the elbow, or an abnormal twisting of the arm. Here are 6 signs that you may have an elbow fracture:

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Hand Wrist Wrist Pain

7 causes of ulnar-sided wrist pain

wrist pain

Your wrist is extremely important to almost everything you do with your hands, including lifting objects, exercising, preparing food, etc. The ulnar side of your wrist is the side of your “pinkie” finger (or small finger), and pain on this side can be very common. It’s so common, in fact, that it can sometimes be difficult to determine the exact cause. The anatomy of the wrist is extremely complicated, which means that ulnar-sided wrist pain can result from an injury to bones, cartilage, ligaments or tendons.

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Finger Hand Hand Pain Hand Therapy

5 Common Hand and Finger Exercises

If you’ve suffered an injury, are recovering from surgery or are living with a condition that affects your hands, chances are you’ve seen a hand therapist or have received instructions to do so by your hand surgeon. Hand therapists are essential to helping patients recover from injuries or surgeries and can help those in pain get back to living a normal life. Hand therapists and hand surgeons often work closely together to determine the best outcome for their patients.

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Animal Bite Hand Snakebite

What to Do After a Snakebite

Photo courtesy of Business Insider

by John M. Erickson, MD

The majority of snakes in the United States are non-venomous. These snakes are not dangerous to humans. The two main families of venomous snakes include the Viperidea and Elapidae families. The Copperhead, Cottonmouth (often called “water moccasins”) and rattlesnakes are examples of pit vipers in the Viperidea Family. Pit Vipers make up approximately 98% of the venomous snake bites in the United States. The coral snake is the only snake in the Elapidae Family native to the United States, and it is much less common than pit vipers.

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