Category : Hand

Fireworks Hand Hand Safety

Here’s Why Fireworks Are Dangerous

It’s hard to imagine a Fourth of July holiday without fireworks. It’s an American tradition that’s both fun and exciting, but fireworks can be dangerous. Here’s why.

They’re unpredictable.

Fireworks can explode unexpectedly and can even go off in the wrong direction sometimes. It’s also hard to gauge exactly how large an explosion may be, especially with illegal fireworks. If a firework explodes in your hand, you could lose your hand completely.

Sometimes, you may come across a firework that is a “dud.” If this occurs, do not attempt to relight the firework. Instead, wait 20 minutes after the initial attempt, then place the firework in a bucket of water.

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Artificial Skin Hand Hand Therapy Skin

Advice from a Hand Therapist: Artificial Skin

What is artificial skin?

We’re answering your questions about artificial skin.

My friend had a bad burn on her hand. She mentioned that the doctor used artificial skin on her hand. What is artificial skin anyway?

Artificial skin is a term used to describe a group of products used to treat burns and other wounds. Skin is the largest organ in our body. You can think of it as a fortress. Its chief purpose is to provide protection to the structures inside our bodies as well as to keep our body temperature regulated. A burn or a wound is a hole in that fortress that makes us susceptible to infections or loss of important fluids. Our skin has a remarkable ability to heal itself, but sometimes an injury may involve an area so large that the body cannot heal fast enough to prevent complications. Sometimes these wounds can be covered with skin grafts from elsewhere on the body. However, this can be painful, and, if the area is very large, a skin graft may not be possible. Artificial skin can be one way that these areas can be covered.

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Finger Fingertip Injury Hand

Ask a Doctor: Fingertip Injuries

Hand surgeon Ryan Zimmerman, MD answers your questions about fingertip injuries.

Fingertip Injuries

What are fingertips made of?

Fingertips have several parts, all with special purposes.  At the core is the bone, called the distal phalanx, which provides support and shape to the end of the finger.  On the top and bottom of the bone are tendons that attach to the bone and make it move.  On the top rests the nail, supported by the specialized nail bed skin just below.  The rest of the fingertip is covered by skin that has lots of nerves, which give fingertips their sensitivity. 

Are fingertip injuries common?  How do they happen?

Fingertips are one of the most commonly injured body parts, and injuries can happen lots of different ways.  Two common ways are cuts, such as from a knife, or crush injuries, such as getting caught in a car door or under a heavy object. 

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Dog Walking Hand Injury

Many dog owners are holding their dog’s leads incorrectly, warn surgeons

from Country Living

Dog walkers could be putting themselves at risk of serious hand injuries by holding dog leads incorrectly, surgeons have warned.

According to the British Society for Surgery of the Hand, severe hand injuries can be caused by the sudden movement of dogs after many owners wrap the lead around their wrist or fingers when out on a walk.

They have explained that holding your dog’s lead incorrectly could lead to: 

  • Lacerations
  • Friction burns
  • Fractures
  • Ligament injuries

Read the full story.

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Elbow Hand Shoulder Sports Injury

The Biceps Brachii: A Common Cause of Shoulder and Elbow Pain in Athletes

Hand surgeon Benjamin R. Graves MD discusses the biceps brachii and the impact it has on the shoulders and elbows of athletes.

As an upper extremity surgeon, I see patients of all ages, sports, and skill levels for shoulder and elbow injuries on a daily basis.  These problems can be acute or chronic and vary from mild to severe.  Mild cases can often be treated with non-surgical measures, whereas more severe injuries may require surgery. 

One muscle in particular, the biceps brachii (pronounced bray-key-eye), is frequently injured during sports activity, and is one of the more common reasons a patient may come to see me for evaluation.  What makes this muscle unique is that it spans two joints, the shoulder and the elbow.  This means that an injury to the “biceps” can involve the elbow, the shoulder, or both.

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Boxing Hand Sports Injury

The Beginner’s Guide to Boxing Wraps

from Livestrong

Boxing a great cardiovascular workout — you can also burn up to 900 calories in just 30 minutes of intense boxing, turning you into a fat-burning, muscle-gaining machine. And it also happens to be a fantastic stress-relieving workout. There’s just something so therapeutic about punching something to release pent-up aggression.

Before you jump into the ring with just a set of boxing gloves, though, you first need to protect your hands with boxing wraps to prevent a serious injury.

Read the full story.

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Hand Shoulder Shoulder Arthritis

How to treat shoulder arthritis

Shoulder arthritis is a condition that can cause pain in the shoulder that typically worsens with activity. This can include something as simple as reaching the arm over the head. The pain can be in the back of the shoulder (as with arthritis of the G-H joint) or the top of the shoulder (as with A-C arthritis). Shoulder arthritis can also cause loss of motion or a grinding feeling when you move.

How can this be treated? Shoulder arthritis is treated similarly to other arthritis conditions. Options may include:

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Hand Hand Therapy Overuse Technology

Advice From a Certified Hand Therapist: Electronic Device Safety

With an increase in the use of personal electronic devices during our daily lives, we need to be aware of potential negative impacts these devices can have on our bodies.  Using electronic devices for extended periods of time, holding a static position, can create stress on our bodies.

Signs and Symptoms of Overuse

  • Numbness in the fingers from sustaining wrist and elbow positions while holding the device. 
  • Cramping of the fingers and thumbs from using smaller devices for extended periods of time. Keep in mind that for every 1 kg of pressure applied to the pad of your thumb, there is 13 times that amount at the base of your thumb! 
  • Inflammation from repetitive movements causing triggering or catching in the fingers. 
  • Muscle stiffness in the neck or shoulders due to a prolonged bent posture when using devices.
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