Category : Hand

Finger Hand Texting Thumb Thumb Pain

Random Fact: Texting Thumb

Did you know? There is no technical diagnosis called “texting thumb,” but pain from repetitive motions, such as texting, can be treated. Learn more.

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Hand Musician Pain

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist for Musicians

©furtseff/fotolia

“…the instrument becomes an extension of the body, for example, the bow of the violinist or the drumsticks of the drummer.” – Schlinger, 2006.

Many musicians say they “merge” with their instrument when they are playing – that they lose themselves and do not know where they stop and the instrument begins. This process leads to beautiful music; however, it can lead to less body awareness, pain and overuse injuries related to playing their instrument.

Statistics estimate more than 39,000 people are formally employed as musicians in the United States. This does not include the large numbers of children and teenagers just starting out, or devoted amateur and professional musicians playing night and weekend shows. Among this large number of musicians, studies have shown that the percentage who report having play-related pain may actually be higher than in other professions. In some groups, more than 90% of musicians surveyed reported having some type of pain.

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Hand Hand Surgery Opioids Pain

How Do Former Opioid Addicts Safely Get Pain Relief After Surgery?

from NPR

Nearly 1.5 million Americans were treated for addiction to prescription opioids or heroin in 2015, according to federal estimates, and when those people get seriously hurt or need surgery, it’s often not clear, even to many doctors, how to safely manage their pain. For some former addicts, what begins as pain relief ends in tragedy.

Max Baker is one such case. He started using prescription pain pills as a teenager in New England and quickly moved on to heroin. His father, Dr. James Baker, is a physician in the Worcester, Mass., area, and says he saw signs that his son was high on opioids — in Max’s pupils and skin tone. He begged Max to stop.

“He would have slurred speech, and be nodding off at the dinner table, and we’d go to a concert together and he would disappear and come back acting differently,” James Baker says.

It was a long, painful slog, but Max eventually sought help. When he was 22, he was prescribed an opioid called suboxone, a standard relapse prevention drug that helps wean people off opioids. After a year, he’d worked his way off that medication, too.

Read the full story.

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Hand Hand Surgery Tendon Transfer Surgery Tendons

4 Reasons You May Need Tendon Transfer Surgery

Tendon transfer surgery is a procedure during which a tendon is shifted from its original attachment to a new one (see figure above). There are many reasons that this procedure may be necessary. Your hand surgeon will determine if this is the right surgery for you. Here are four potential reasons for tendon transfer surgery:

  1. Nerve Injuries: If a nerve is injured and cannot be repaired, it no longer sends signals to certain muscles, which paralyzes those muscles. This surgery can make those muscles work again. An example of this is a spinal cord injury.
  2. Muscle Injuries: If a muscle has been cut or broken and cannot be repaired, this surgery can help. A tendon can rupture due to something like Rheumatoid Arthritis.
  3. Disorder of the Nervous System: Sometimes, a disease may prevent nerve signals from being sent to muscles. Examples are cerebral palsy and a stroke. Tendon transfer surgery may help.
  4. Birth Defects: Sometimes, babies are born without certain muscle functions, and this surgery may bring back function.
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Arthritis Hand Joints MP Joint Arthritis

Ask a Doctor: MP Joint Arthritis

Dr. David J. Bozentka answers your questions about MP joint arthritis.

What is the MP joint?

Figure 1

The metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint is the large knuckle joint located where the fingers and thumb meet the hand (Figure 1).  The metacarpal bones lie within the palm and the phalanges lie within the digits.    The metacarpal head, or ball part of the MP joint, meets with the proximal phalanx which makes up the socket part of the joint.  The bones on each side of the joint have a cartilage surface that allows smooth gliding.  Multiple tendons cross this joint.  Flexor tendons and small additional tendons in the hand promote flexion, or bending.  The extensor tendons promote extension, or straightening, of the joint.  A collateral ligament on each side of the joint provides stability for a pinching motion.  The bones, ligaments, and tendons of the MP joint allow motion and stability for optimal hand function.

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Hand Hand Therapy Mirror Therapy Pain

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Mirror Therapy for Chronic Pain

Chronic pain that does not respond to conventional treatment can be frustrating for both the person with the pain and the team of people trying to help alleviate the pain. You may have heard of mirror therapy, but are unsure of what it is or who can benefit. To answer these questions, I consulted Susan Stralka, PT, DPT, MS. Susan has many years of experience treating patients with chronic pain and has lectured around the world on this topic.

What is mirror therapy?

Mirror therapy is a rehabilitation technique that uses the mirror image of a non-painful limb to retrain the brain about its perception of a painful limb. The non-painful limb (such as a hand or foot) is placed in front of a mirror and the painful limb is placed behind the mirror out of sight.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery Leprosy

The Art of Surgery: Life Drawing and Leprosy

from The Guardian

“Life drawing”, “still life” and “life class” are all fairly mundane terms I thought only applied to nude figures or fruit bowls in an art studio. However, in November, I stood and drew in the corner of a plastic surgeon’s theatre in Lalgadh hospital, near Janakpur in Nepal. The theatre was set up to operate on the paralysed hands of leprosy patients. “Life drawing” became very appropriate very quickly.

Like many infectious diseases that predominantly affect those in poverty, leprosy is alive and well; there were more than 200,000 new cases were reported in 2015. The sad fact is that the disease is difficult to contract and relatively straightforward to treat. Many patients present late, when paralysis sets in. Although medication can make patients non-infective, the paralysis requires surgery to correct.

Each year, Working Hands – a Bristol-based charity run by hand surgeon Donald Sammut – spends two weeks, pro bono, operating on the backlog of patients in Lalgadh, training staff and providing hundreds of kilos of medical equipment and consumables. The work is highly skilled, but in many cases the objective is simple: to generate enough movement and power in a hand for the patient to go back to work, or to eat, or to look after themselves in a society where stigma is attached to those with the disease. Most of these patients are illiterate farmers whose only means of support depends on how much they can dig, or carry.

Read the full story.

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Bacteria Finger Hand Hand Infection

11 Types of Hand Infections

Hand infections can cause serious problems and symptoms, both before and after the infection is resolved. They can result in stiff hands, weak hands, and loss of tissues such as skin, nerve and bone.  It is important to visit a hand surgeon immediately and get early treatment if you have signs of one of these hand infections:

1. Atypical Mycobacterial Infection: This infection can result from puncture wounds from fish spines or contamination of a wound or cut from stagnant water (in nature or from aquariums). It will come on gradually, and you may feel stiffness and swelling.

2. Bite Wound Infection: This can be caused by a human or animal bite due to bacteria in the mouth. Seek treatment immediately after a bite wound.

3. Cellulitis: This is a skin infection that can cause skin redness, warmth, and pain. People with cellulitis may have a fever or feel sick. Seek treatment immediately, as this infection can cause serious problems.

4. Deep Space Infection: One of the compartments or “deep spaces” of the hand can become infected even from a small puncture. A pocket of puss may form at the base of the thumb, on the palm, or between the fingers.

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