Category : Hand

Hand Hand Tumor Lumps and Bumps

3 Common Types of Hand Tumors

While any lump or bump you find on your hand or wrist can be considered a “tumor,” it does not mean that the tumor is cancerous. There are many different types of hand tumors, and most are benign, which means non-cancerous. Hand tumors can be something as common as a wart or a mole, which are on top of the skin, or something more uncommon that is beneath the skin. Here are some examples of common hand tumors:

Ganglion Cyst1. Ganglion Cysts
These are some of the most common tumors in the hand, and the cause is unknown. Ganglion cysts are seen frequently in the wrist but can also appear at the base of your fingers or around the finger joints. The bump is typically filled with fluid, and it will feel very firm.  It may or may not be painful. This type of tumor is not cancerous. If the bump is not painful and is not affecting your daily life, your surgeon may recommend to leave it alone. Other treatment options may include aspiration (puncturing with a needle) or surgically removing it.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Hand Surgery

9 Things You Need to Know About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

from SELF

Think of carpal tunnel syndrome as pins and needles on steroids. This health condition can cause persistent numbness, tingling, and burning in your fingers, wrists, and even your arms. Luckily, carpal tunnel treatment is precise enough that it has the potential to completely resolve the problem that fuels this syndrome in the first place. So here’s everything you need to know about carpal tunnel syndrome, including how to treat it if you’re experiencing symptoms.

1. Carpal tunnel syndrome all comes down to a single nerve.

The median nerve, which runs from your forearm into your thumb, index, and middle fingers, along with part of your ring finger, is nestled inside a canal known as the carpal tunnel. “When the median nerve doesn’t get enough blood flow, it makes your hand hurt and feel like it’s tingling and numb,” Leon S. Benson, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon with the Illinois Bone and Joint Institutewho specializes in elbow, hand, and shoulder issues, tells SELF.

Read the full story.

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Anatomy Hand Tendons Wrist

Anatomy 101: Wrist Tendons

Tendons are fibrous cords that are similar to a rope, attached to muscles and bone. The tendons that control movement in your hands, wrists and fingers run through your forearm. There are 6 tendons that help move your wrist. The wrist tendons are:

  • Flexor carpi radialis: This tendon is one of two tendons that bend the wrist.  It attaches to the base of the second and third hand bones.  It also attaches to the trapezium, one of your wrist bones.
  • Flexor carpi ulnaris: This is the other tendon that bends the wrist. It attaches to the pisiform, another wrist bone, and to the 5th hand bone.
  • Palmaris longus tendon:  This tendon is unique because only 3/4 of the population has it. For those who do have it, it can vary in size. It is, however, a tendon you can live without because it has very little function in the hand and wrist. This tendon is often used to repair other tendons since it serves such a small purpose.
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Hand Hand Surgeon Steroid Injection

Ask a Doctor: Steroid Injections

Hand surgeon Steven Goldberg, MD, answers your questions about steroid injections.

Steroid injections are a common non-operative treatment for multiple musculoskeletal conditions. The following are a list of some conditions where steroid injections may be recommended:


How do steroids work?

There are different types of steroids. Glucocorticoid steroids are the ones used to treat the musculoskeletal problems listed above. There are many different types of steroids that have different onsets of action, duration, solubility, and reasons for use. Any single medication may be used at different doses and volumes depending on the clinical problem. There is no single steroid regimen that is “best”. They have different effects on many different types of tissue, but they may work to reduce inflammation and change the array of proteins that cells make.

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Arthritis Hand Hand Therapy Thumb Arthritis

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Surgery for Thumb Arthritis Pain

Thumb arthritis pain can be debilitating, making everyday self-care tasks intolerable. There is a surgical option when other treatments, such as injections and therapy, fail to adequately reduce pain. A carpometacarpal arthroplasty or CMC arthroplasty is a joint replacement procedure for the base of your thumb. It eliminates the grinding and pain felt from the rubbing of bone on bone after the protective cartilage has worn away, usually caused by arthritis.

Below are some commonly asked questions regarding this procedure:

Will I be in a cast?

Yes. You will likely be in a cast for 2-4 weeks. You will also use either a removable orthosis a hand therapist will custom make for you or an off-the-shelf thumb and wrist splint for a month after the cast has been removed. This will help maintain the optimum position of your thumb as you are healing and protect your new thumb joint.

What happens after my thumb has been immobilized?

Any time a joint has been immobilized, it takes time to regain your flexibility. For this surgery, the wrist and thumb are usually quite stiff. Your doctor will likely recommend you see a hand therapist to assist you with regaining the range of motion and strength safely.

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Hand Hand Surgery Replantation

What is Replantation?

Replantation is a procedure during which a surgeon will reattach a finger, hand or arm that has been completely cut from a person’s body. Replantation, however, isn’t always an option. A surgeon will only perform this procedure if the limb is still expected to function without pain. Sometimes, the body part is too damaged to perform a replant.

This procedure takes a number of hours to complete. The steps include:

  • Step 1: Damaged tissue is carefully removed.
  • Step 2: Bone ends are shortened and rejoined with pins, wires, or plates and screws. This holds the part in place to allow the rest of the tissues to be restored.
  • Step 3: Muscles, tendons, arteries, nerves and veins are then repaired. Sometimes grafts or artificial spacers of bone, skin, tendons and blood vessels may be needed, too. The grafts can be from your own body or from a tissue bank.
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Hand Hand Pain Overuse

Smartphone-Related Hand Injuries and How to Reduce Them

from WRVO Public Media

Repeated use of anything can cause wear and tear including your smartphone. Continued scrolling and tapping can wear down the tendons in your hand and wrist causing injury. Repetitive use injuries are common in older adults but health professionals are seeing injury in younger patients as the age smartphone use decreases.

Dr. Daniel Polatsch, an orthopedic hand surgeon and co-director of the New York Hand and Wrist Center of Lenox Hill, joins us this week to discuss how extended use of smartphones can cause injury and how to reduce the risk of it.

Trigger finger and tendonitis are two of the more common injuries related to overusing your hands. This is usually common in people who spend long hours typing at the computer all day but Polatsch is seeing more patients come in with these injuries due to smartphone use.

“It can develop into something called a trigger finger or trigger thumb which is actually the proper name,” said Polatsch.

Read the full story.

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Hand Hand Safety Knife Safety Turkey Carving

Infographic: How to Carve a Turkey

In the United States, 88% of people eat turkey on Thanksgiving. That leaves a lot of room for hand injuries! It’s not uncommon to accidentally cut yourself while carving a turkey or other meats. Unfortunately, carving injuries can be serious, sometimes involving amputation. Here’s how you can safely carve a turkey this Thanksgiving:

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