Category : Nerves

Anatomy Brachial Plexus Nerves Shoulder

Anatomy 101: Brachial Plexus

brachial-plexus

The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that stem from the spinal cord in the neck and travel all the way down the arm. These nerves control the muscles of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand. They also provide feeling in the arm.

It starts with the five “roots” at the neck. The second level is called “trunks,” which continue toward the shoulder then divide into the third layer of two nerves called the anterior division and the posterior division. The nerves in the fourth layer are called “cords,” and the final layer is comprised of the “branches” that feed the shoulder and arm. See the image below for details.

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Cubital Tunnel Syndrome Elbow Hand Nerves

Ask a Doctor: Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

ask a doctor_cubital tunnel

Dr. Douglas E. Pittner answers your questions about Cubital Tunnel Syndrome.

My doctor said I have cubital tunnel syndrome.  What does that mean?
The cubital tunnel is the name for a space, like a tunnel, at the inside of the elbow.  It is where your ulnar nerve (the “funny bone” nerve) travels around the elbow and into your forearm.  Sometimes problems develop in this area.  It is possible for this tunnel to be too tight, causing pressure on the ulnar nerve.  The nerve can also be stretched as it travels around the elbow.  Cubital tunnel syndrome refers to the pain, numbness, or weakness that is caused by these problems around the elbow.

Why do my fingers to go numb?
The ulnar nerve travels from your elbow to your hand and provides sensation to your fingers as well as connections to important muscles in your hand.  The nerve acts like an electrical wire that sends signals to and from the hand.  When this nerve is stretched or compressed at the elbow, the electrical signals can be slow.  Your body interprets this as numbness or tingling, usually in the small and ring fingers.  You may experience pain in the elbow or forearm.  Weakness can also develop in the hand muscles which can cause decreased strength with gripping or pinching.

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Anatomy Hand Nerves

Anatomy 101: Nerves of the Upper Extremity

Nerves-Peripheral-Musculo cropped

Nerves are essential to everything that you do. The nervous system carries messages to and from the brain. Nerves control your movements and actions, the sensations you feel on your skin (including pleasure or pain), and even your heart rate and blood pressure. In the upper extremity, the nerves are:

  • Ulnar nerve: This nerve provides sensation to the hand, especially the small and ring fingers, and contributes to the muscles that bend the wrist. It travels around the inside of the elbow and across the wrist.
  • Radial nerve: This nerve contributes to muscles that bend the wrist, fingers and elbow. It also provides sensation on the back of the hand and thumb.
  • Median nerve: This nerve provides sensation to the hand. It travels down the middle of the forearm and crosses the wrist through the carpal tunnel.
  • Musculocutaneous nerve: This nerve contributes to muscles that bend the elbow and provides sensation to the forearm.
  • Axillary  nerve: This nerve provides signals to muscles that help raise the arm. It travels deep around the shoulder.

Nerves are fragile and can be damaged by pressure, stretching, or cutting. Learn more about the signs of a nerve injury and how it can be treated. Brush up on your anatomy knowledge at www.HandCare.org.

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Cubital Tunnel Syndrome Finger Hand Nerves

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: Description, Symptoms and Treatment

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome is a condition that is caused by pressure or stretching of the ulnar nerve (the “funny bone”), which can cause you to feel numbness or tingling, pain and/or weakness in the hand and fingers. It can prevent you from performing daily tasks and affect you during the night.

This condition can be treated with simple activity modification, but surgery may be needed.

Watch this 3-minute video to learn more about Cubital Tunnel Syndrome, including possible symptoms and your treatment options. Visit www.HandCare.org to read about this condition in detail.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Nerves Wrist

5 Signs of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Man holding his hand - pain concept

Carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common conditions of the hand. It happens when there is pressure on the median nerve in the wrist. It can be caused by things like arthritis and fractures, but, ultimately, there can be many causes.

Here are 5 signs that you may have carpal tunnel:

  1. Pain
  2. Numbness
  3. Tingling
  4. Weaker grip
  5. Tendency to drop things

Numbness and tingling is common in the thumb and pointer, middle and ring fingers. Sometimes, symptoms can be worse during the night, but they can also be felt during daily activities.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Nerves Wrist

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Check out this latest video from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand that explains the causes, symptoms and treatment options for carpal tunnel syndrome.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused by swelling in the carpal tunnel, which puts pressure on the nerve.  This pressure can happen due to joint dislocations, fractures, arthritis, and many other causes. Symptoms can include pain, numbness, tingling, a weak grip and clumsiness. Learn more about carpal tunnel syndrome at www.handcare.org.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Nerves Wrist

Carpal Tunnel and Migraines

Could your splitting migraine possibly be related to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Check out the latest ASSH Facebook post about recent findings that link the two.


Learn more about the link between #carpaltunnel and #migraines that member Douglas M. Sammers, MD, FACS and a team of other plastic surgeons at UT Southwestern Medical Center found. http://bit.ly/1bLhomM

Posted by American Society for Surgery of the Hand on Monday, April 27, 2015

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