Category : Shoulder

Dislocated Shoulder Shoulder Shoulder Pain

How to Fix a Dislocated Shoulder

A dislocated shoulder happens when enough force is applied to the arm that the ball dislocates from the socket. If you’ve dislocated your shoulder, you’re likely feeling a lot of pain, your shoulder may appear abnormal, and it’s likely difficult to move your arm/shoulder.

The best way to fix a dislocated shoulder is to visit the emergency room or a healthcare professional such as an upper extremity surgeon. Here’s why you should visit a professional rather than doing it yourself:

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Arm Hand Surgeon Shoulder

Arm and Shoulder Injuries: A Q&A with Orthopedic Surgeon Matthew Meunier, MD

from UC San Diego Health

Millions of people in the United States break a bone each year, about half of which affect the arm. At the same time, approximately two million people visit their doctors for a rotator cuff problem, and osteoarthritis is the most frequent cause of disability in the nation.

Matthew Meunier, MD, sees it all. He’s an orthopedic surgeon at UC San Diego Health and associate team physician for the San Diego Padres, specializing in hand, upper extremity and microvascular surgery. In this Q&A, Meunier discusses the types of issues he treats, and how people can prevent and seek help for these conditions.

Read the full story.

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Elbow Hand Shoulder Sports Injury

The Biceps Brachii: A Common Cause of Shoulder and Elbow Pain in Athletes

Hand surgeon Benjamin R. Graves MD discusses the biceps brachii and the impact it has on the shoulders and elbows of athletes.

As an upper extremity surgeon, I see patients of all ages, sports, and skill levels for shoulder and elbow injuries on a daily basis.  These problems can be acute or chronic and vary from mild to severe.  Mild cases can often be treated with non-surgical measures, whereas more severe injuries may require surgery. 

One muscle in particular, the biceps brachii (pronounced bray-key-eye), is frequently injured during sports activity, and is one of the more common reasons a patient may come to see me for evaluation.  What makes this muscle unique is that it spans two joints, the shoulder and the elbow.  This means that an injury to the “biceps” can involve the elbow, the shoulder, or both.

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Hand Shoulder Shoulder Arthritis

How to treat shoulder arthritis

Shoulder arthritis is a condition that can cause pain in the shoulder that typically worsens with activity. This can include something as simple as reaching the arm over the head. The pain can be in the back of the shoulder (as with arthritis of the G-H joint) or the top of the shoulder (as with A-C arthritis). Shoulder arthritis can also cause loss of motion or a grinding feeling when you move.

How can this be treated? Shoulder arthritis is treated similarly to other arthritis conditions. Options may include:

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Broken Bone Shoulder Shoulder Fracture

3 Types of Shoulder Fractures

A shoulder fracture is another word for a broken shoulder. The shoulder is a complex joint that connects the arm to the body. It has many different parts, including the humerus (upper arm bone), the scapula (shoulder blade bone) and the clavicle (collarbone). The upper end of the humerus has a ball-like shape that connects with the socket of the scapula, called the glenoid, creating the “ball and socket”.

Here are three different types of shoulder fractures:

  • Clavicle Fracture: A broken collarbone is the most common type shoulder fracture. It usually results from a fall.
  • Proximal Humerus Fracture: This is a fracture of the upper part of the arm. Sometimes, proximal humerus fractures just involve cracks in the bone rather than the bone moving far out of its position. This type of broken bone is more common in people 65 years of age or older.
  • Scapula Fractures: A fracture of the scapula bone is rare. It usually results from a traumatic event such as a car accident or a long fall.
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Hand Muscles Rotator Cuff Shoulder

Anatomy 101: The Rotator Cuff

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and tendons that surround the shoulder joint. These muscles and tendons provide stability in the shoulder, attaching around the head of the humerus bone, encircling it like a cuff. These four muscles include:

  • Infraspinatous: This muscle is positioned more behind the shoulder joint. It helps to externally rotate the arm, for example, when you are throwing a ball.
  • Supraspinatous: This muscle forms the upper border of the rotator cuff. It helps you bring your arm away from your body.
  • Subscapularis: This is the only rotator cuff muscle that is actually in front of the shoulder. It helps rotate the arm toward the body, such as when you touch your stomach.
  • Teres Minor: This muscle primarily helps externally rotate the shoulder, but it also helps pull the arm into the body.
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Brachial Plexus Nerves Shoulder

Ask a Doctor: Brachial Plexus Injuries

Hand surgeon Ryan Zimmerman, MD answers your questions about brachial plexus injuries.


What is the brachial plexus? 

The brachial plexus is a complicated web of nerves located near the base of your neck and top of your shoulder.  Typically, five nerves from the spinal cord at your neck weave together and eventually form the nerves for your shoulder, arm and hand.

How do brachial plexus injuries happen?

Brachial plexus injuries usually happen due to a stretching injury across the nerves.  Most of the time, the nerves get stretched but stay connected.  In severe cases, the nerves can tear. There are a few common ways for brachial plexus injuries to happen.  In newborns, the injury can occur during birth, This is more likely if the baby gets stuck during delivery.  During sports, tackles or collisions can cause a stretch injury.  This is commonly referred to as a “stinger” or “burner.”  In car or motorcycle accidents, the brachial plexus can be stretched by the force of the impact.

What are the symptoms of a brachial plexus injury?

Each injury is unique, and the symptoms are due to the exact nerves that get stretched and how badly they get stretched.  Many patients with brachial plexus injuries describe “electrical” or shooting pains that can run all the way down to the hand.  Numbness and weakness are also common.  The numbness can range from a slight funny feeling to total numbness. Weakness can range from mild loss of strength to total inability to move the shoulder, elbow, or hand.

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Brachial Plexus Hand Nerves Shoulder

What is a Brachial Plexus Injury?

The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that start in the spinal cord in the neck and travel down the arm. These nerves control the muscles of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, as well as provide feeling in the arm. If you have a brachial plexus injury, it means you have damaged a nerve.

Nerve injuries can be very serious, as they can stop signals to and from the brain. Nerves can be damaged by stretching, pressure or cutting. Stretching can occur when the head and neck are forced away from the shoulder, such as during a motorcycle or car accident. Pressure could occur if the brachial plexus is crushed, which can happen during a fracture or dislocation. You will know if you have a nerve injury, as opposed to just a broken bone or other injury, if you’ve lost feeling in your arm.

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