Category : Tendons

de Quervain's Tenosynovitis Tendonitis Tendons

Advice from a CHT: How to Prevent Tendonitis in New Mothers

De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is a common, painful inflammation of two tendons that move your thumb.  Most people with de Quervain’s will have pain at their wrist (just below the thumb) that will worsen with thumb or wrist movement. It is most often seen in women, especially in those who have recently had a child or those at the end of pregnancy – usually due to a combination of repetitive movement and an increase in swelling, which naturally occurs during pregnancy; however, all caregivers of young children can be susceptible to this overuse condition.

What can I do to prevent de Quervain’s?

The most important advice is to avoid overuse and repetitive motions of your wrist and thumb. Moving your thumb or wrist from side to side repeatedly (thumb side to little finger side) can provoke symptoms.  Changing the way we do things to rely on stronger, more capable muscles to do a job is helpful.

Specifically for new parents and caregivers, some tips include:

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Bicep Tendon Tear Elbow Shoulder Tendons

A Detailed Guide About Bicep Tendon Tears

Guest post from BicepTendonTear.com

A bicep tendon is a band of fibrous tissues which has the property of being tough as well as flexible. It can withstand tension due to its flexibility. A bicep tendon tear can occur at two places, either at the elbow or at the shoulder. Bicep tear occurring at the shoulder is more common. 90% of the tears happen at the shoulder. Main reasons being over-head weight lifting, not warming up properly before any heavy physical activity, smoking too much, and age. Use of steroids is harmful as well; they lead to various disorders such as deficiency in sperm count, impotency and infertility. Moreover, they may lead to dysplasia of collagen fibrils, which can decrease the tensile strength of tendon, thus causing the bicep tendon to tear. These tears weaken your arm to an extent that 30% of your flexural strength and 40% of your supination strength decreases.

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Hand Hand Surgery Tendon Transfer Surgery Tendons

4 Reasons You May Need Tendon Transfer Surgery

Tendon transfer surgery is a procedure during which a tendon is shifted from its original attachment to a new one (see figure above). There are many reasons that this procedure may be necessary. Your hand surgeon will determine if this is the right surgery for you. Here are four potential reasons for tendon transfer surgery:

  1. Nerve Injuries: If a nerve is injured and cannot be repaired, it no longer sends signals to certain muscles, which paralyzes those muscles. This surgery can make those muscles work again. An example of this is a spinal cord injury.
  2. Muscle Injuries: If a muscle has been cut or broken and cannot be repaired, this surgery can help. A tendon can rupture due to something like Rheumatoid Arthritis.
  3. Disorder of the Nervous System: Sometimes, a disease may prevent nerve signals from being sent to muscles. Examples are cerebral palsy and a stroke. Tendon transfer surgery may help.
  4. Birth Defects: Sometimes, babies are born without certain muscle functions, and this surgery may bring back function.
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Anatomy Hand Tendons Thumb

Anatomy 101: Thumb Tendons

tendons

 

Did you know that the tendons attached to your thumb run all the way up your forearm? There are four thumb tendons:

  • Abductor pollicis longus: This tendon helps you move the thumb away from the palm to form an open hand.
  • Flexor pollicis longus: This tendon helps you bend the thumb.
  • Extensor pollicis brevis: This tendon travels along the back of the thumb and helps straighten the thumb. It connects the muscle in the back of the forearm to the bone in the middle of the thumb.
  • Extensor pollicis longus:  This tendon also travels along the back of the thumb and helps straighten the thumb, but it connects the muscle in the back of the forearm to the bone at the tip of the thumb.

Learn more about anatomy of the fingers, hand, wrist, arm and shoulder at www.HandCare.org.

 

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Elbow Hand Lateral Epicondylitis Tendons Tennis Elbow

Ask a Doctor: Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. Noah Raizman answers your questions about Lateral Epicondylitis, sometimes known as tennis elbow.

Q: What is Lateral Epicondylitis, and is it the same thing as “Tennis Elbow?”
A: Lateral Epicondylitis and Tennis Elbow are one and the same. Lateral Epicondylitis is a painful condition caused by damage to the elbow where the tendons that extend your wrist and fingers originate from. That area is called the lateral epicondyle. Tendons attach muscle to bone. The primary muscle that allows your wrist to extend, the ECRB (extensor carpi radialis brevis), is usually the tendon involved.

Q: What causes it?
A: Lateral Epicondylitis can be caused by trauma, repetitive mild trauma and overuse, but truly, we are not sure why some people get it and others do not. We consider it a “tendinopathy of middle age” because it typically happens in patients in their 40s and 50s, though it can occur at any age. Sometimes it is due to sports activities like golf or racquet sports and sometimes from work activities, but, just as often, it seems to happen after lifting or carrying objects.

Q: What are the symptoms?
A: Lateral Epicondylitis typically includes symptoms such as pain over the outside (lateral) part of the elbow. There is typically no clicking, popping or feeling of instability. There typically is no pain over the back or inside of the elbow. The pain is worst with gripping, grasping and wringing activities and can be provoked by typing or using a computer mouse with the wrist extended. There is not usually any numbness or tingling associated with it.

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de Quervain's Tenosynovitis Hand Tendons Wrist

Ask a Doctor: de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

 

Dr. Carl B. Weiss, an orthopaedic surgeon, answers your questions about de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis.

Q: What is de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis?

A: De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis is a condition caused by entrapment of some of the tendons going to your thumb.  These tendons, called the abductor pollicis longus and the extensor pollicis brevis, go through a snug tunnel at the wrist, called the first dorsal extensor compartment.  You can see the tendons on the back of your hand when you straighten your fingers. When, for whatever reason, the tunnel becomes too tight, it sets up a vicious cycle; whenever you move your thumb in certain ways, it pulls the tendons through the tight tunnel, causing pain and further aggravating the condition.

Q: How is the diagnosis made?

A: A hand surgeon can help determine if you have de Quervain’s.  If you have tenderness over the tendons and pain when you make a fist with your thumb tucked inside and bend the wrist with the pinkie facing down (see image), then you have what is known as a positive Finkelstein’s sign, which would indicate that you likely have de Quervain’s.  However, there are other causes of pain in this area, such as arthritis in the joint at the base of your thumb, which can feel similar to de Quervain’s.  Therefore, x-rays may be used to help make the diagnosis.  A hand surgeon can distinguish between these conditions, though it is quite possible that a patient has both.

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