Category : Wrist

Hand Wrist Wrist Sprain

Ask a Doctor: Wrist Sprain

ask-a-doctor_wrist-sprain

Dr. Khurram Pervaiz answers your questions about wrist sprains:

My doctor told me I have a “wrist sprain.” What is that?

A sprain is an injury that involves damage to the ligaments of the wrist. This damage may range from a simple stretch injury with inflammation and irritation of the ligament to a partial tear of the ligament.

What causes a wrist sprain?

Wrist sprains are most commonly caused by trauma. This trauma may range from a simple fall to a car accident or a sports injury. Athletes who participate in sports that involve impact to the wrist are particularly at risk. Gymnastics, cheerleading, martial arts, and CrossFit are some examples of sports that can cause wrist impact.

What are some of the symptoms of a wrist sprain?

The most common symptom of a wrist sprain is pain and swelling of the wrist.  Limited function with weakness and lack of use of the hand and wrist may also occur.

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Hand Wrist Wrist Pain

7 causes of ulnar-sided wrist pain

people, healthcare and problem concept - close up of man suffering from pain in hand oe wrist at home

The “pinkie” side of the wrist is also known as the ulnar side. Pain on this side can be very common. It can result from injury to bones, cartilage, ligaments or tendons. Due to this wide range of causes, it can be difficult to determine why the pain is happening. Here are some possible causes of ulnar-sided wrist pain:

  1. Wrist fracture
  2. Arthritis of the joint(s) between the bones
  3. Ulnar Impaction Syndrome (when the ulna is longer than the radius, which can cause it to “bump into” the smaller wrist bones)
  4. Inflammation or irritation of the tendons that bend and extend the wrist
  5. Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Injury (TFCC) (when the connection between the ulna bone and other structures in the wrist is torn by an injury or frayed over time)
  6. Nerve injury or compression
  7. Tumors, most commonly ganglion cysts, that are benign
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Arthritis Hand Wrist

5 causes of wrist pain

Closeup on business woman with wrist pain

Hand surgeon Avery Arora, MD talks about common causes of wrist pain.

Even though the wrist is a relatively small part of the body, it has eight bones, as well as ligaments, tendons and tissue. The wrist also happens to be easy to damage, which could cause not only pain but also limited use of the wrist and hand. A wide range of things can affect the wrist.

1. Repetitive Motion

One of the most common reasons that people develop pain in their wrists is due to repetitive motion. Motions that cause your hands to do the same things, even simply staying in the same position for a long period can have terrible effects on the wrist. Driving for too long, typing and more can cause irritation in the joints, as well as stress fractures in some cases. This can lead to chronic pain for many patients.

2. Physical Impacts

Physical impacts, such as falling on your wrist or having something hit your wrist is a cause of injury and pain as well. An impact can cause a fracture, as well as a strain or a sprain. Even if the impact does not break a bone, it can harm the nerves, and cause tissue damage and swelling.

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Hand Wrist Wrist Fracture Wrist Sprain

Is it Sprained or Fractured? How to Tell What’s Wrong with Your Wrist

Closeup on business woman with wrist pain

from The Scope

Even a small slip or fall onto an outstretched hand can injure your wrist, but just how bad is it? Should you ice and elevate the injury? Or go to the doctor for an X-ray? Orthopedic surgeon and hand specialist Dr. Andrew Tyser lends his expertise on this episode of “The Specialists,” and explains what to look out for when it comes to wrist injuries.

Dr. Miller: How would somebody know if they might have a wrist fracture versus a sprain of the wrist? What are the common ways that we get wrist fractures?

Dr. Tyser: That’s a great question. I think it’s important to know that wrist fractures in general are very common as are wrist sprains. Many times they’re caused by similar mechanisms. Lots of times people have a simple fall from ground level, sometimes slipping on the ice, sometimes falling off a bike. And the first question is, this hurts, is it broken or not?

Read the full story.

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Elbow Hand Hand Therapy Wrist

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist on Desk Posture

a woman sitting at a desk and has pain in the back. symbol photo for proper posture at work in the office.

I sit at a desk most of the workday, keyboarding. My wrists and elbows are always aching. Is there anything I can do?

If you spend most of your day at a desk, your work station should be evaluated and adjusted to ensure proper positioning and desk posture. Your work station should be set up specifically for you. There are many symptoms that may occur from sitting at a poorly designed work station. These symptoms include fatigue or soreness of wrists, elbows, neck, scapular region and lower back. Eventually, if these signs aren’t addressed, you may start to experience pain or numbness and tingling in these areas. If your work station is shared, it should be adjustable to fit the needs of all who use that workstation.

What should my work station look like?

Proper workstation assessment should include looking at the height of your chair, the type of keyboard and mouse you’re using, and position of your monitor. Proper height of your chair should allow ankles, knees, hips and elbows to rest at 90 degrees.

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Ganglion Cysts Hand Lumps and Bumps Wrist

5 treatment options for a Ganglion Cyst

ganglion cysts

A ganglion cyst is a lump in the hand or wrist that is not uncommon. The cysts can vary in size or even disappear completely, and they may or may not be painful. Usually, they are round-shaped and can be firm, and it may be painful to put pressure on the bump. Treatment for ganglion cysts depends on the location of the cyst and your personal situation. Here are some options your hand surgeon may recommend:

  1. Observation: Sometimes, doing nothing is the best option, as the cyst may go away.
  2. Splints: Material used to support the area.
  3. Anti-inflammatory medication: This may decrease pain during your daily activities. It can be used along with a splint.
  4. Aspiration: Using a needle to remove fluid from the cyst.
  5. Surgery: Completely removing the cyst.

Consult your doctor about the best treatment option for you. Learn more about ganglion cysts and find a hand surgeon at www.HandCare.org.

 

 

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Hand Wrist Wrist Fracture

Wrist Fractures: Causes and Treatment

Learn about wrist fractures, what causes them, and how to treat them in this video from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.

A wrist fracture is a medical term for a broken wrist. There are different types of wrist fractures. It can be “non-displaced,” which means the bones do not move out of place, or it can be “displaced,” when the bones need to be put back in the right place with a cast or splint. Both of these fractures are stable. It can also be unstable, which means the bone may have shattered and cannot be fixed with a cast or splint.

Fractures can be treated with a cast, splint or even surgery. It depends on your personal circumstances. Learn more about wrist fractures, and view additional videos at www.HandCare.org.

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Hand Hand Tumor Lumps and Bumps Wrist Wrist Tumor

Ask a Doctor: Hand Tumors and Wrist Tumors

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. Ekkehard Bonatz answers your questions about the lumps and bumps you may find on your hand or wrist.

I have been told I may need surgery for a tumor in my hand. What does that mean?

A “tumor” simply means there is a swelling that is not normally there, and your doctor feels it needs further examination. Sometimes it is referred to as a mass.

What kinds of tumors should I be concerned about?

Most tumors or masses on the hand and wrist are benign and are not cancer. Most commonly they are ganglion cysts. They are fluid-filled and can change in size. A giant cell tumor is a benign collection of tissue around a joint or a tendon. A thickening in the skin of the palm can also be a sign of Dupuytren’s contracture.

When should I see a hand surgeon about a tumor, growth or mass?

When the problem interferes enough with your hand function during the day or while enjoying a particular hobby, you may want to seek further advice. Many patients experience mild pain or discomfort, while others just notice a lump that wasn’t there before.

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