Tag Archives: thumb pain

Arthritis Hand Thumb Thumb Arthritis

Ask a Doctor: Thumb Arthritis

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. Tamara Clancy answers your questions about thumb arthritis, also known as arthritis base of the thumb.

What is the painful bump at the base of my thumb?

This is more than likely wear-and-tear arthritis, and the bump is one of the bones (metacarpal) that becomes prominent as the joint wears out (cartilage thins).

What is the cause?

The cause is the cartilage in the joint thinning out.  Some of this is genetic (inherited).  Injury and joint laxity (being “double-jointed”) may contribute to developing this as well.  It is also more common in women.

Is there any way to know if my pain will get worse?

No — this is a problem that usually gets worse as we get older, but there is no way to predict how rapidly the pain will progress in a particular person.

Read More
Hand Thumb Thumb Arthritis Thumb Pain

Thumb Arthritis: Symptoms, Treatment and Recovery

 

Thumb arthritis, sometimes known as “basal joint arthritis” or “arthritis base of the thumb,” is a condition that is genetic and tends to come with age. Patients with thumb arthritis find it difficult to perform daily tasks such as opening a jar or turning a doorknob. The pain and swelling is found at the base of the thumb.

Watch this two-minute video to see how a quick surgery can relieve thumb arthritis symptoms if splints and injections do not work for you.

Learn more about Thumb Arthritis and watch more short videos at www.HandCare.org.

Read More
Finger Hand Thumb Trigger Finger

Ask a Doctor: Trigger Finger

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. Sameer Puri answers your most important questions about stenosing tenosynovitis, also known as trigger finger.

My doctor told me I might have a “trigger finger.” What is that?

“Trigger finger,” or stenosing tenosynovitis, is a condition that causes pain, locking, popping or clicking of the fingers or thumb when the hand is opened or closed.

What causes trigger finger?

Muscles in your forearm attach to tendons that run all the way to the bones at the ends of your fingers. These muscles help you bend your fingers into a fist. In the hand, the tendons are held close to the bone by pulleys. If the pulleys become too tight or thick, or the tendon gets swollen, the tendon can get stuck. If the tendon cannot glide freely, trigger finger occurs.

What are some of the symptoms of trigger finger?

In its early stages, trigger finger can cause pain. Usually, it is tender on your palm where the finger joins the hand. Sometimes, you feel the pain further along or even on the back of the finger. You might feel like your hands or fingers are stiff or swollen. As it progresses, the tightness can cause the tendon to catch as it tries to glide, leading to a painful snapping sensation when making a fist or opening the hand. Eventually, the finger can get stuck where it is, making it really hard either to straighten or to bend it.

The symptoms are often worst in the mornings immediately after waking up and can occur in any of the fingers or thumbs.

Read More
de Quervain's Tenosynovitis Hand Tendons Wrist

Ask a Doctor: de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

 

Dr. Carl B. Weiss, an orthopaedic surgeon, answers your questions about de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis.

Q: What is de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis?

A: De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis is a condition caused by entrapment of some of the tendons going to your thumb.  These tendons, called the abductor pollicis longus and the extensor pollicis brevis, go through a snug tunnel at the wrist, called the first dorsal extensor compartment.  You can see the tendons on the back of your hand when you straighten your fingers. When, for whatever reason, the tunnel becomes too tight, it sets up a vicious cycle; whenever you move your thumb in certain ways, it pulls the tendons through the tight tunnel, causing pain and further aggravating the condition.

Q: How is the diagnosis made?

A: A hand surgeon can help determine if you have de Quervain’s.  If you have tenderness over the tendons and pain when you make a fist with your thumb tucked inside and bend the wrist with the pinkie facing down (see image), then you have what is known as a positive Finkelstein’s sign, which would indicate that you likely have de Quervain’s.  However, there are other causes of pain in this area, such as arthritis in the joint at the base of your thumb, which can feel similar to de Quervain’s.  Therefore, x-rays may be used to help make the diagnosis.  A hand surgeon can distinguish between these conditions, though it is quite possible that a patient has both.

Read More