Finger Hand Trigger Finger

5 Signs You Have Trigger Finger

Trigger finger is a condition that can cause discomfort at the base of the finger or thumb, right where the finger joins the palm. Officially known as stenosing tenosynovitis, trigger finger can also be referred to as “trigger thumb.” This condition involves the tendons that bend the fingers. These tendons normally glide easily with the help of pulleys, which hold the tendons close to the bone. In individuals with trigger finger, the pulley becomes too thick, making it difficult for the tendon to glide.

Here are five signs that you may have trigger finger:

  1. Pain/discomfort at the base of the finger or thumb
  2. Popping-sound when you move your finger
  3. Catching feeling
  4. Limited finger movement
  5. Lump at the base of the finger or thumb
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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery

Best Hand Surgeons in the U.S.

The American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) includes a membership of more than 3,800 prestigious hand surgeons in the United States and around the world. Hand surgeon members of ASSH are required to meet rigorous standards. They are required to:

  • Pass the Certification in the Subspecialty of Surgery of the Hand, a difficult exam that tests their hand surgery knowledge
  • Be certified in general, orthopaedic or plastic surgery by their Board
  • Be of high moral, ethical and professional standing
  • Have made worthwhile contributions in areas of hand surgery
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Arthritis Hand Lumps and Bumps Warts

Random Fact: Warts

Did you know? Warts on the hands can sometimes be confused with cysts or bone spurs from arthritis. If you aren’t sure about a lump on your hand, visit a hand surgeon. Learn more about warts.

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Bones Elbow Elbow Fracture Hand

Ask a Doctor: Elbow Fractures

Elbow Fractures

Hand surgeon Benjamin R. Graves, MD answers your questions about elbow fractures.


Of all the joints in the body, the elbow is one of the most complex.  This complexity comes from the fact that the “elbow joint” is made up of three separate joints that form where the humerus, radius, and ulna bones meet.  Under normal circumstances, these three joints work together seamlessly to allow the flexion, extension, and forearm rotation we need to brush our hair and teeth, feed ourselves, turn a door handle, serve a tennis ball, and perform a multitude of other daily tasks.

Fractures involving the elbow can range in severity, from relatively minor injuries that heal on their own, to more severe injuries that require surgery.  Elbow fractures can also lead to a lot of questions for patients and their families.  I have compiled a list of five questions that I am frequently asked regarding elbow fractures.

I hurt my elbow. How do I know if I have an elbow fracture?

Elbow fractures can occur in a variety of ways.  Low-energy injuries, such as falls from standing or bumping the elbow onto a hard object can lead to small, stable fractures that can easily be mistaken for a sprain or strain.  They don’t always cause deformity or instability, and might only cause limited swelling and hurt-to-the-touch in a specific location.  These injuries may hurt for days or weeks and then stop hurting on their own.

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Hand Hand Safety Hand Therapy Snowblower Safety

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Preventing Injuries During Snow Removal

The winter months can be a festive and fun time of year; however, they can also bring many hazards that can lead to hand, wrist, elbow or shoulder injuries. Snow shoveling and removal are strenuous and sometimes risky activities that are necessary in these snowy months, and should be addressed with some simple safety measures to protect yourself from potential injury.

Common safety steps to take when addressing snow removal include:

  • Warm up before tackling snow removal – Doing a short amount of light exercise to warm your body prior to shoveling snow can assist in reducing your risk of injury.
  • Wearing gloves with skid resistant material – One simple strategy to combat the snow is to be sure your gloves and/or mittens have a skid resistant material on the palm and fingers. This will allow you to have adequate grip on your shovel to prevent unnecessary slipping of your equipment.
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Cubital Tunnel Syndrome Elbow Hand Nerves

3 Causes of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome is a condition that involves the ulnar nerve, also known as the “funny bone” nerve, which runs on the inner side of the elbow. This condition can cause numbness or tingling in the ring finger and small finger (sometimes referred to as “pins and needles”), pain in the forearm, loss of sensation and/or weakness in the hand.

Here are three potential causes of this condition:

  1. Pressure: The ulnar nerve has little padding over it, so direct pressure (like leaning your arm on an arm rest) can cause the arm and hand — especially the ring and small fingers — to “fall asleep.”
  2. Stretching: Keeping the elbow bent for a long time can stretch the ulnar nerve.  This can happen while you sleep or if you are holding a phone for a long period of time, for example.
  3. Anatomy: Sometimes, the ulnar nerve simply does not stay in its place. It will snap back and forth over a bony bump as you move your elbow, which can irritate the nerve.
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Finger Hand Hangnail

Why You Should Never, Ever Rip Off Your Hangnail

Hang Nail

from Men’s Health

Hangnails can make any grown man wince. They’re pesky, and even though they’re so small, they can hurt like hell.

“Most people don’t notice a hangnail until after it has fully developed and they feel roughness around the nail or pain from inflammation,” says Benjamin J. Jacobs, M.D., hand surgeon at Rebound Orthopedics and Neurosurgery in Portland, Oregon.

But they happen to everyone, and they can be particularly bad in winter months. But here’s how to prevent hangnails from happening and the best ways treat the ones that already exist.

Read the full story.

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Finger Hand Swan Neck Deformity

What is a Swan Neck Deformity?

Swan Neck Deformity
A Swan Neck Deformity is a deformity of the finger in which the middle joint is bent back more than normal, and the tip of the finger is bent down. Sometimes, this deformity can be caused by an injury. Other times, it can happen over time due to a condition such as rheumatoid arthritis.

The odd bending of the finger is usually due to a tear of a ligament in the middle joint of the finger.  Sometimes, the tendon is torn. It causes the tendon to become weak. Eventually, the ability of the tendons to straighten the joint becomes lessened, causing the bending. Here are some signs that you have a Swan Neck Deformity:

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