Anatomy Finger Hand Joints

Anatomy 101: Finger Joints

Joints are cartilage surfaces that connect bones to each other. This cartilage allows our bones to glide smoothly against one another, allowing us painless movement. There are four joints in each finger, totaling 20 joints in each hand!

The small, ringer, middle and index fingers all have the same four joints:

  1. Distal Interphalangeal Joint (DIP): The DIP joint is located at the tip of the finger, just before the finger nail starts. Arthritis can develop at this joint, and it is also commonly fractured.
  2. Proximal Interphalangeal Joint (PIP): The PIP joint is the joint just below the DIP joint. It is located below the top two bones of the finger and allows the finger to bend and extend. This joint can become stiff easily after injury.
  3. Metacarpophalangeal Joint (MCP): The MP joint is where the hand bone meets the finger bone, referred to as the “knuckle.” These joints are very important, allowing us to bend/flex and spread our fingers.
  4. Carpometacarpal Joint (CMC Joint): The CMC joint is located at the bottom of the hand bone. This joint varies in each finger. For example, in the index finger, it has little motion. In the small finger, it has a lot of motion. Injuries and problems with this joint are uncommon.

The thumb joints are a little different than the other finger joints. To learn more about the thumb joints and more about the finger joints, visit our online Anatomy section.

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Hand Hand Safety Knife Safety Pumpkin Carving

How to Carve a Pumpkin

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Food Hand Hand Therapy Knife Safety

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Kitchen Knife Safety

Serious hand injuries can occur during daily activities such as preparing food. Many hand injuries can be prevented with simple adjustments to routines. In preparation for the upcoming fall cooking season, please consider some safe, simple adjustments to your own routine in cutting various food items to prevent knife slips, which can cause injuries to the tendons or the nerves in your hand.

Mangoes

This delicious, yet slippery fruit can be a challenge when it comes to cutting and preparing for serving. The danger arises from removing the outside peel of the fruit. Once this is removed, the fruit center is extremely juicy and becomes difficult to hold. The fruit is also oval-shaped, difficult to place on a cutting board and has a large pit in the center.

Here’s a safe method for preparing mangoes:

  1. Keep the peel intact! Instead, stand the mango on a cutting board with stem side down and cut mango into two large pieces from either side of the pit. Be sure to cut toward a cutting board or solid surface and not the palm of your hand.
  2. Taking the two large pieces with peel side on cutting board, you can use a paring knife to cut cubes or slices of the mango, being sure not to cut through the peel. Again, be certain you are cutting toward a hard surface and not your hand.
  3. Once all your cuts are made, you can begin to peel away the skin of the mango by turning the skin inside out OR you can use a spoon (not anything sharp) and scoop the cut pieces away from the skin of the mango.
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Arthritis Hand Osteoarthritis

Ask a Doctor: Osteoarthritis

Hand surgeon Khurram Pervaiz, MD answers your questions about osteoarthritis.

My doctor told me I have osteoarthritis. What is that?

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis and involves wear and tear of the joint.  This form of arthritis is caused by inflammation, breakdown, and the eventual loss of cartilage in the joint – the cartilage wears down over time.

What causes osteoarthritis?

There are many reasons for osteoarthritis of a joint. The most common factors that lead to osteoarthritis are old age, genetics, weight and injury / trauma.

What are some of the symptoms of osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis affecting a joint can cause a variety of symptoms such as pain, stiffness (limited mobility), warmth, and swelling. There may be a grating feeling (or crepitus) with movement of the joint.

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Ganglion Cysts Hand Lumps and Bumps

How to Know If You Have a Ganglion Cyst

Ganglion cysts are lumps in the hand and wrist that are fairly common. They can occur in people of all ages, and the cause is unknown. Sometimes they are painful, but many times they will not affect you. Here’s how to know that you have a ganglion cyst and not a wart or different type of lump:

  • The lump may be filled with clear fluid or gel.
  • The lump will be oval or round in shape.
  • Light is often able to pass through the lump (transillumination).

Your ganglion cyst may change in size over time or even disappear completely. Some are soft and some are firm. To treat a ganglion cyst, sometimes it may be appropriate to simply do nothing. Other times, your surgeon may recommend a splint, medication, aspiration (removing the fluid with a needle), or surgery.

Talk to your hand surgeon about the best treatment option for you. Learn more about ganglion cysts at www.HandCare.org.

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Hand Hand Safety Safety Gloves

Guide to Comparing Safety Gloves

Guest post from Enviro Tech

A glove should fit your hand perfectly. It also should fit the situation in which you’re using it. Although safety gloves are a necessity in the workplace, not enough workers fully understand their importance.

Many hand injuries in the workplace occur because the worker involved isn’t wearing safety gloves.  Sometimes injuries occur when the gloves being worn are inadequate for the hazard.  It isn’t enough for workers to simply be wearing safety gloves while on the job — they need to be wearing the right gloves for the specific job.

There is a wide variety of safety gloves designed to protect workers in a wide variety of hazardous situations. Some gloves are designed to protect from caustic substances, while others are designed to guard against sharp objects. Some safety gloves offer protection only against extreme cold. Certain types of gloves offer workers the manual dexterity required for detailed and delicate work, while others limit dexterity due to their construction. Knowing which safety gloves fit the situation is crucial for workers to protect themselves and/or avoid costly accidents.

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Arm Hand Scar Treatment Scars

5 Ways to Heal a Scar

You may have a scar from an injury or just from a surgery. It may be red, raised and firm. Some scars can even be sensitive or affect the way you use your hand or arm. To make sure that your scar does not affect your motion, and to help it heal properly, try these treatments:

  1. Scar Massage: Use Vaseline or any lotion to massage your scar twice a day for 10 minutes. This can help decrease sensitivity.
  2. Exercise: This can help prevent stiffness of joints near your scar.
  3. Apply Silicone Gel: This gel can be put on your scar in liquid or sheet form.
  4. Vibrating/Rubbing: Using vibration or rubbing your scar with different textures can desensitize it.
  5. Injection or Surgery: These options may be available if you have a unique problem with your scar.
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Arthritis Hand Rheumatoid Arthritis

Random Fact – Rheumatoid Arthritis

Did you know? People in manufacturing jobs may have a higher risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. Learn more about how rheumatoid arthritis is different from other types of arthritis.

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