ASSH Fireworks Hand Hand Safety

Infographic: 6 Fireworks Safety Tips from Hand Surgeons

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Hand Safety Hand Therapy Lawnmower Tendons

Advice from a Hand Therapist: Lawnmower and Equipment Safety – Tendon Injuries

Summer is here which means more time enjoying the outdoors and working to maintain landscaping. This may mean mowing the lawn, trimming the hedges or cutting down those hanging tree limbs. These activities may require the use of equipment that has very sharp edges. In the summer, hand therapists see many injuries related to these activities. One of those being tendon injuries, which can mean a  cut of the tendon(s) in the forearm or hand that help open and close the hand. Tendon injuries can be very serious injuries, especially if not correctly addressed with surgery and rehabilitation. If you cut yourself and find a lack of ability to move a finger, thumb or wrist with your own power, you should seek medical attention immediately.

Typically, a tendon injury will require surgical repair. Hand therapy then becomes a large part of the recovery. You can find a local certified hand therapist through the American Society of Hand Therapists at www.asht.org/find-a-therapist.

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"Tech Neck" Hand Pain Technology Texting Thumb

Tech neck, texting thumb: Our bad tech habits leave us in pain. Here’s how to feel better

from USA Today

Americans now spend more than five hours a day hunched over, reading emails, sending texts or checking social media sites, according to analytics firm Flurry— and it’s turning into a real pain in the neck. No really, there’s actually a condition called “tech neck,” and there’s a good chance you — or someone in your family — have it.

ImagineMD, a direct primary care medical company based in Chicago, gathered Google search trend data to rank tech pains by the number of times people searched for them. “Tech neck” is one of the most frequently Googled tech-related conditions in the U.S. these days, right behind “texting thumb” and “cell phone elbow.”

And while the terms might sound funny, these tech-related conditions can be serious and painful. Here are the top three — and what to do about them.

Gamer’s thumb, aka texting thumb

Thumb pain is the No. 1 most-searched-for technology-related injury, with nearly 100,000 monthly searches, according to that ImagineMD report. It’s a repetitive stress injury, caused by too much gripping, tapping and swiping, either on a video game controller or a smartphone screen, says Robert Wysocki, an orthopedic surgeon at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

Read the full story

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Congenital Hand Differences Hand Pediatrics

3 Common Congenital Hand Differences

con·gen·i·tal
(adjective)
(especially of a disease or physical abnormality) present from birth

A congenital hand difference is a hand that is abnormal at birth. During fetal development, the upper limbs are formed between four and eight weeks of pregnancy.  During this time, many steps are needed to form a normal arm and hand.  If any of these steps fail, then a congenital hand difference can result. It is not uncommon for a child to be born with a hand difference. In fact, 1 in 20 babies are born with one.

Some congenital hand differences can be major, and some can be minor. Here are 3 common differences:

  1. Syndactyly: This is when parts of the hand are webbed or fused together (failure of separation).
  2. Polydactyly: This is when the child has an extra small finger (duplication).
  3. Radial Polydactyly: This is when the child has an extra thumb (duplication).
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Hand Muscles Rotator Cuff Shoulder

Anatomy 101: The Rotator Cuff

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and tendons that surround the shoulder joint. These muscles and tendons provide stability in the shoulder, attaching around the head of the humerus bone, encircling it like a cuff. These four muscles include:

  • Infraspinatous: This muscle is positioned more behind the shoulder joint. It helps to externally rotate the arm, for example, when you are throwing a ball.
  • Supraspinatous: This muscle forms the upper border of the rotator cuff. It helps you bring your arm away from your body.
  • Subscapularis: This is the only rotator cuff muscle that is actually in front of the shoulder. It helps rotate the arm toward the body, such as when you touch your stomach.
  • Teres Minor: This muscle primarily helps externally rotate the shoulder, but it also helps pull the arm into the body.
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Joint Replacement Surgery Technology

Random Fact: Joint Replacement Surgery

Did you know? With advanced technology, custom implants for a joint replacement now match your exact anatomy. Read about joint replacement surgery and learn more about why this procedure is so accurate.

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Hand Ulnar-Sided Wrist Pain Wrist Wrist Pain

Ask a Doctor: Ulnar-Sided Wrist Pain


Hand surgeon Mark Yuhas, MD answers your questions about ulnar-sided wrist pain.

What does it mean to have “ulnar-sided” wrist pain?

Pain on the ulnar side of the wrist refers to pain in the region of the wrist on the “pinky side” of the wrist joint. The structures on the pinky side of the wrist make a complex interaction with bones, joints, ligaments, and tendons.  They allow us to grip, twist the forearm and wrist, and move the wrist forward (flexion) and backward (extension).  In the wrist, injury or wearing down of these structures may lead to pain or instability.

What are some causes of ulnar-sided wrist pain?

In a relatively small area on the ulnar side of the wrist, there are many different structures. The main structures that cause pain in this part of the wrist are ligaments (soft tissue that connects bone to bone), tendons (soft tissue that connects bone to muscle), bone, or cartilage (allow joints to move smoothly).  Also on this side of the wrist is the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) which is a group of soft tissue structures that work together.

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Gardening Hand Hand Safety Hand Therapy

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: The Joys of Gardening Without the Risk of Injury

“The glory of gardening: hands in the dirt, head in the sun, heart with nature. To nurture a garden is to not just feed the body but the soul” – Alfred Austin

Gardening is a meaningful activity for people across the lifespan. It can add beauty and nutrition as well as be an outlet for stress relief and a means of exercise. While it has many benefits, it can also be hard work for the muscles and joints of your hands and arms. Here are some tips and tricks that may help you reduce your risk for pain and increase your joy and productivity in the garden.

Tools

Good gardening tools can be especially helpful to reduce risk and pain associated with repetitive use injuries.

  • Tools with built up handles can reduce the grip strength required to perform activities and protect your joints. Wide handled or ergonomic tools may also be available on the internet or in local shops.
  • To build up the handles of your own tools, pipe insulation can be purchased at your local hardware store.
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