Bones Kienbock's Disease Wrist Wrist Pain

Ask a Doctor: Kienbock’s Disease

kienbocks

Dr. Mark Yuhas answers your questions about Kienbock’s Disease:

What is Kienbock’s Disease?

Kienbock’s Disease, also known as avascular necrosis of the lunate, is a disease that can result in pain and stiffness in the wrist. The lunate is one of eight small bones in the wrist that give the wrist its complex and unique motion.  “Avascular necrosis” is a lack of blood supply to the bone, which results in bone death. Blood supply is important to all bones to grow, heal, and provide structure and support to the body. Without blood supply, the lunate may not provide the same support and structure needed for proper wrist function.

What is the cause of Kienbock’s Disease? Can it be prevented?

There are several theories about the cause of Kienbock’s Disease, but a single cause has not been identified. Multiple variables are thought to be involved, including a history of wrist trauma. Other contributing factors include variations in anatomy such as the position of the forearm bones at the wrist, the shape of the lunate, and the pattern of blood supply to the lunate. Most of these factors are not able to be controlled by the patient.

There is no way that we know to prevent Kienbock’s Disease. However, it is important to identify this problem as soon as possible in order to prevent progression of the disease which can lead to wrist arthritis. This ultimately can cause pain, stiffness, and decreased function in the wrist.

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Hand Hand Safety Knife Safety

Avoiding Hand Injuries in the Kitchen

from Sun News

We are aware that we should exercise caution to prevent job-related injuries at work. However, many injuries happen at home, especially in the kitchen. Hand injuries are some of the worst kind. Cut hand tendons and ligaments are not only painful, but extremely hard to restore through surgery.

Our hands are our “money makers.” Without their proper use, life is much more difficult. Not only at work, but when at home, too, we should take the proper precautions whenever performing a task that involves a blade (like cutting, chopping, or peeling) – even if the task does not seem “dangerous.” Here’s a great video showing some basic kitchen knife techniques – the cross chop and the rock chop.

Recently, attention has been drawn to the injury known as “avocado hand.” This is what surgeons and doctors call hands that have been lacerated by a knife while slicing an avocado. Click HERE to watch a video on how to prevent “avocado hand.” Instead of holding the avocado with your bare hand, you can use a damp towel or a cutting board to slice the avocado and remove the pit.

Read the full story.

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Hand Hand Therapy Paraffin Wax

What is Paraffin Wax?

Paraffin Wax Unit

Paraffin wax is a type of wax used for candles that can also be used to relieve pain from arthritis, sore joints or sore muscles. When the wax is melted and becomes hot, submerging your hands in the wax can be a great method to sooth pain. Paraffin wax is an at-home treatment that has been recommended by hand specialists.

You should NOT use paraffin wax if you have an open cut/wound on your hands or if you’ve had past issues with sensation in your hands.

This at-home treatment can be completed by either renting or purchasing a paraffin wax unit, both of which are low-cost options. You can buy a unit at a local drugstore.

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Burns Grilling Hand Hand Safety

How to Grill Safely

Outdoor grilling is a favorite summer activity in the U.S. It’s fun, easy, and produces great tasting food. But grilling also poses a safety risk, whether you are using a charcoal or gas grill. Your hands are exposed to high heat and susceptible to burns. Here’s how to grill safely:

Always wear gloves.

When turning food or removing items from the grill, always use potholders or insulated gloves to protect your hands from the heat. The flame could flare up without notice.

Use long utensils.

Use long utensils that are meant for grilling when placing food on the grill, turning it or removing it so that your hands do not get too close to the flame.

Avoid grilling on windy days.

The winds can cause the flame to jump which may burn your hands or start clothing on fire.

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Finger Hand Hand Safety

5 Steps to Removing a Stuck Ring

Getting a ring stuck on your finger is not uncommon. It can happen if you force a ring onto your finger that is too small, but it can also happen over time. Sometimes, your joints become arthritic, causing the joints or tissue to swell, which can cause the ring to get stuck.

Here’s an easy way to remove a stuck ring in 5 steps:

  1. Squirt some Windex (or some soap or oil) on the finger and ring to lubricate it.
  2. Elevate the hand overhead for 5-10 minutes with ice around the ring and finger.
  3. Slide a long string of dental floss (or other thread) under the stuck ring with the bulk of it toward the fingertip (Figure 1).
  4. Beginning at the top of the ring, tightly wrap the floss around and around your finger all the way up and over the knuckle (Figure 2).
  5. Take the opposite end of the string and begin to unwrap the floss. The ring will slide over the knuckle as you go (Figure 3).
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Anatomy Bones Shoulder

Anatomy 101: Shoulder Bones

There are five major bones in the shoulder. The shoulder bones can easily be affected by falls or accidents, in addition to arthritis. Here is an overview of the shoulder bones:

  1. Scapula: Another name for this bone is the shoulder blade. There are 17 muscles that attach to the scapula! Much of your shoulder motion is between the scapula and the chest. The scapula is part of the “shoulder girdle” which also includes muscle and ligament that allow your shoulder to move.
  2. Clavicle: This bone is also referred to as the collar bone. The clavicle connects the arm to the chest. It has joints on both ends, which can become arthritic.
  3. Acromion: This bone is a flat projection of the scapula that gives the shoulder its square shape.
  4. Coracoid Process: This bone is also a projection of the scapula. It points outward toward the front of the body. This bone is important because its muscles and ligaments help support the clavicle, shoulder joint and humerus.
  5. Glenoid Cavity: This is the socket portion of the ball-and-socket joint of the shoulder. Any abnormalities in the cavity can cause joint instability, which can lead to a condition called “frozen shoulder.”

Learn more about the shoulder bones and the anatomy of the upper extremity (including the hand, wrist, arm and shoulder) at www.HandCare.org/hand-arm-anatomy.

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Hand Hand Therapy Pencil Grip

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Modifications to Pencil Grip for Handwriting

As a pediatric hand therapist, I see clients who hold their pens and pencils a little bit differently than most. Typically, these clients are using a different grip to compensate for weakness or loose joints. An altered grasp is not in itself a bad thing until it creates a problem.

The problem is usually a complaint of pain with handwriting. An individual with loose joints develops an altered grasp pattern in order to increase stability when writing, thus allowing them to write clearly. An example of a modified grip is excessive extension of the tip of the fingers or thumb along with excessive flexion of the second joint of the thumb.

Another example involves holding the pencil tight in the first web space while using all four fingers and thumb to stabilize the pencil.

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Hand Hand Conditions Hand Pain

Best Ways to Cope With Hand Pain

from Harvard Health Letter

Hand pain becomes common as we get older. Tingling and numbness, aching or locking joints, and difficulty grasping objects are frequent complaints. But don’t make your own diagnosis and suffer in silence. “It’s difficult to discern between different types of hand pain. Some have overlapping symptoms,” says Dr. Sang-Gil Lee, a hand surgeon at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital.

Dr. Lee advises that you seek treatment as soon as possible for persistent hand pain, before it gets so advanced that it’s tough to use your hands for even the simplest jobs, like brushing your teeth or buttoning a shirt.

The following are common types of hand pain and their treatments.

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the wearing away of cartilage in the joints. Any joint is susceptible. However, in the fingers, it’s typically the last joint before the fingernail that’s affected. On the thumb, it’s usually the joint at the base of the hand. Symptoms include stiffness and pain that goes away with rest. “What causes pain is the restriction of gliding motion. It causes inflammation,” explains Dr. Lee. To diagnose osteoarthritis, your doctor may order an x-ray to look at the bones.

Read the full story.

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