Arthritis Hand Hand Therapy Paraffin Wax

9 steps to treating your hands with paraffin wax

Spa salon. Manicure. Paraffin hand bath. Studio photo set.

Paraffin wax can provide relief from arthritis pain, sore joints or sore muscles. It is a type of wax that is used for candles and can be used in your own home. A paraffin wax unit can be purchased for a low cost or even rented. Learn how to safely use one of these units for your hands by following these 9 steps:

1. Wash your hands with soap and water and dry them.

2. Rub lotion onto your hands: Hand lotion allows the wax to be removed easily after treatment.

3. Dip your hand into the wax (Figure 1 above): Your fingertips should go in first. Keep your fingers separated and submerse your hand all the way past the wrist if desired.

4. Remove your hand after it has been coated with wax.

5. Repeat steps 3 and 4: Dip your hand 6-8 times, waiting a few seconds between each dip. This allows layers of wax to form over your hand.

6. Immediately cover your hand with a plastic bag and wrap with a hand towel (Figure 2 below): Wait 10-15 minutes. This will create moist, deep heat for your hand.

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Arthritis Hand MP Joint Arthritis Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Thumb Arthritis

Random Fact: Arthritis

Doctor's hand holding a wrinkled elderly hand

Arthritis impacts 53 million adults and 300,000 children. Learn about the different types that may affect your hands, including  osteoarthritis, arthritis base of the thumb, MP joint arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

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Broken Finger Finger Fracture Hand

Ask a Doctor: Broken Finger

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. John Erickson explains when to visit a doctor for a broken finger.

If you recently injured your finger and are wondering if it is broken, the best thing to do is get an x-ray to find out. You can get x-rays in your physician’s office, urgent care, or local emergency room. Many breaks or fractures in the fingers can be misdiagnosed as “just a sprain” or a “jammed finger.” If a finger fracture is not treated appropriately, the long-term results may not be good. I have heard from many patients “I could still move it, so I didn’t think it was broken.” In many cases, a fracture causes the finger to be stiff and difficult to move; however, this is not true in all cases. When in doubt, get it checked out.

The signs of a broken finger are:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Stiffness
  • Numbness
  • Pain with range of motion
  • Deformity
  • Skin lacerations
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Hand Hand Therapy Joints Thumb Thumb Pain

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Living with(out) thumb pain

Closeup on young housewife opening jar of pickled cucumbers

I have pain in the palm of my hand at the base of my thumb. It hurts more when I try to open jars, and I frequently have to ask someone for help. Is there anything I can do to make this less painful?

Hand therapists discuss something called joint protection, which is all about – you guessed it – protecting your joints! Thumb pain can occur when there is joint inflammation and swelling. With the use of the right tools, you can perform the same tasks while minimizing or eliminating the pain. Tools to help with opening jars come in a variety of shapes and sizes.

For jars that have a vacuum seal (pasta sauces or jam jars), a device called a jar popper/jar key can help break the seal without stressing your thumb. This works similar to a church key for removing bottle tops. It catches the side of the lid and you use the leverage of the tool to release the vacuum. Once that is accomplished, opening the lid is much easier – and less painful!

OA Tool leverage 1  OA Tool leverage 2

That’s interesting. Does it work for pill bottles, too?

Good question! Because pill bottles don’t have a vacuum, it does not work for them; however, there is another option to help you out.

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Elbow Elbow Fracture Hand

6 signs of an elbow fracture

A young woman touching her painful elbow

An elbow fracture is another term for a broken elbow. It can result from a fall, a direct blow to the elbow, or an abnormal twisting of the arm. An x-ray can confirm if you have fractured your elbow, but how do you know whether to visit a hand surgeon or the emergency room? Here are 6 signs of an elbow fracture:

  1. Swelling and bruising of the elbow
  2. Extreme pain
  3. Stiffness in and around the elbow
  4. Snap or pop at the time of the injury
  5. Visible deformity
  6. Numbness or weakness in the arm, wrist and hand

Some elbow fractures are more severe than others. If the bones have not moved and have low risk of moving, a sling, cast or splint will be used to treat the injury. If the fracture is more severe, surgery may be required.

Learn more about the different types of elbow fractures, potential treatment options, and long-term side effects of this injury at www.handcare.org.

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Elbow Hand Lateral Epicondylitis Tennis Elbow

Symptoms, causes and treatment of Tennis Elbow

This 2-minute video tells you everything you need to know about the painful condition Lateral Epicondylitis, also known as Tennis Elbow.

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Arm Elbow Hand Shoulder Wrist

Follow The HandCare Blog on Twitter @HandCareMD

Get all the information from The HandCare Blog plus more in 140 characters or less! Follow @HandCareMD on Twitter for information on conditions, fun facts, and updates on your favorite athlete and celebrity hand surgeries.



 

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Hand Hand Transplant Pediatrics

Q&A with Dr. Scott Levin, the lead surgeon in 8-year-old Zion’s double hand transplant

L. Scott Levin, MD

from the Naples Herald by Gary Levine

Zion Harvey…an archetypal eight-year-old in so many ways…yet wistfully distinctive in so many others…was the recipient, last week, of a gift like no other.

As a toddler (age 2), Zion horrifically lost both hands and both feet to Sepsis…a life-threatening complication from infection.  Two years later, the infection severely damaged his kidneys and required a kidney transplant…the organ donated by his mother, Pattie Ray.

Despite unimaginable misfortune, Zion is bursting with bravura…with determination…with a gutsiness that most could never muster.

levin-scottApproximately three years ago, Pattie began the search for prosthetic hands for her son.  She approached Dr. Scott Kozin, Chief of Staff at Shriners Hospital for Children in Philadelphia who, along with his partner, Dr. Dan Zlotolow, offered a far more progressive suggestion…Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation…make Zion the youngest recipient of a bilateral hand transplant.Zion has already been successfully fitted for prosthetics for his feet and utilizes them to the fullest.

Drs. Kozin and Zlotolow referred Pattie and Zion to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Hand Transplantation Program…led by Dr. Scott Levin.

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