Arm Casts and Splints Hand Hand Safety

How to take care of your arm cast

Close-up of a young woman's hand in plaster.

Whether it’s an arm cast, wrist splint or finger splint, many types of casts can help your recovery from surgery or an injury. Casts are hard, made with plaster or fiberglass, while splints are lighter and can be taken on and off more easily. These are important to protecting you while your injury heals, so follow these tips to take good care of your cast or splint:

  1. Keep your cast or splint clean and dry. Getting it wet could irritate your skin. Cover it with a plastic bag, seal it with tape or rubber bands to keep it dry, and elevate it overhead while showering.
  2. Do not let dirt, sand or other materials get inside your cast or splint.
  3. Do not stick objects in your cast. If you feel itchy, ask your doctor for advice.
  4. Never attempt to trim your cast. If there are rough edges or your skin is irritated around the ends, contact your doctor.
  5. Contact your doctor if your cast or splint has a crack or soft spot.
  6. Never attempt to remove a cast yourself.

Be sure to contact your doctor if you have worsening pain, excessive swelling, numbness or tingling in your fingers, burning or stinging, or loss of movement in your fingers while wearing a cast. Learn more about casts and splints at www.HandCare.org.

Read More
Hand Hand Safety Ski and Snowboard Injury Thumb

Random Fact: Skiing Injuries

Close up of female skier hands  holding ski poles.Did you know? One of the most common skiing injuries is a thumb ligament tear. Learn how to avoid a ski or snowboard injury this winter at www.HandCare.org.

Read More
Arthritis Hand Thumb Thumb Arthritis

Ask a Doctor: Thumb Arthritis

Medical physician doctor hands. Healthcare background banner.

Dr. Tamara Clancy answers your questions about thumb arthritis, also known as arthritis base of the thumb.

What is the painful bump at the base of my thumb?

This is more than likely wear-and-tear arthritis, and the bump is one of the bones (metacarpal) that becomes prominent as the joint wears out (cartilage thins).

What is the cause?

The cause is the cartilage in the joint thinning out.  Some of this is genetic (inherited).  Injury and joint laxity (being “double-jointed”) may contribute to developing this as well.  It is also more common in women.

Is there any way to know if my pain will get worse?

No — this is a problem that usually gets worse as we get older, but there is no way to predict how rapidly the pain will progress in a particular person.

Read More
Finger Hand Hand Therapy Mallet Finger

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Mallet Finger

Mallet_Fig1A

What is happening to my fingertip? It doesn’t go straight anymore.

If you can’t extend the tip of your finger, you may have what is called a mallet finger. This happens when the end of the tendon that lifts your fingertip becomes separated from the fingertip. There are a few different ways this can happen.

Do I need to do anything about this? Will it heal on its own?

If you have a mallet finger, it needs to be treated; it will not heal on its own. You should consult with your doctor, and possibly a hand surgeon.

A hand surgeon? That sounds serious!

It may be. Sometimes the tendon comes off the fingertip with a portion of the bone – sometimes it only comes partially off. Having a specialist assess it and direct you will ensure you have a good outcome.

Read More
Hand Hand Safety

8 snowblower safety tips

Snowblower Safety v2

Read More
Finger Hand Hand Safety

How to remove a stuck ring

woman is taking off the wedding ring

Can’t get that ring off your finger? A stuck ring can be the result of a ring that’s too small, arthritic joints or swelling. Regardless of the reason, here is a safe way to remove it:

  1. Squirt some Windex – yes Windex – on the finger and ring. Or, use any lubricant such as soap or oil.
  2. Elevate the hand overhead for 5-10 minutes with ice around the ring and finger.
  3. Use dental floss or a thread to compress the swollen finger as shown:
Read More
Arthritis Hand Hand Safety Hand Surgeon

Advice from a doctor on avoiding hand injuries during the holidays

cooking and home concept - close up of male hand cutting tomato on cutting board with sharp knife

from the Sun Sentinel

Longtime West Boca Medical Center and private practice hand surgeon Dr. Michael Joyner sees his share of holiday mishaps – cutting holiday appetizers or prepping dinner with arthritis or using too sharp a knife – and has sage advice on how to ward off hand injuries.

What has arthritis got to do with food preparation?

They don’t have a good hold or grip. A lot of times, they’ll get a cut or laceration. In the hand, it doesn’t bleed so much, but may a hit a nerve. Many times they’ll have a constant numbness or tingling.

Does it get worse?

The longer you wait, the less likely it will be repaired.

What should people do if this happens to them?

I would follow up with a hand surgeon and be evaluated in a timely fashion. That can make a difference in your treatment plan.

Read More
ASSH Hand Hand Surgeon

How to find a good hand surgeon

FAHS screens hotHand surgeons do much more than perform surgery. They can treat you for minor injuries such as a sprained wrist or jammed finger, or give you options for conditions such as carpal tunnel or trigger finger. Even if you’re simply experiencing pain in your hands, visiting a hand surgeon is the best option.

With the new and improved Find a Hand Surgeon tool from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, you can search for a hand surgeon near you from our database of thousands of hand surgeons, all of which are members of our Society. Search by location (city or state or zip code) or search for a specific doctor that you may be familiar with. You can view the results on a Google map to see which surgeons are near you.

Visit www.HandCare.org to use the Find a Hand Surgeon tool and learn about conditions and injuries of the upper extremity.

Read More
1 22 23 24 25 26 32