Elbow Lateral Epicondylitis Tendons Tennis Elbow

How to Treat Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow, officially called lateral epicondylitis, is a condition involving the degeneration of a tendon’s attachment on the outside (lateral) part of the elbow. Simply put, the degeneration causes pain. The pain may be located on the outside of the elbow, and it can be tender to the touch. This condition can also cause pain during activity, especially when gripping or lifting things. Sometimes, the pain will travel down your forearm and into the hand.

Tennis elbow is commonly caused by overuse, which doesn’t necessarily result from playing tennis. Overuse can be from work-related activities such as typing or plumbing, or non-work activities such as painting. It can also be caused by trauma. If you’ve suffered from a direct blow to the elbow at some point, it may lead to degeneration.

Sometimes, tennis elbow pain will go away on its own. If it doesn’t, here are potential methods for treating this condition:

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Cold Hand Disease Finger Hand Raynaud's Phenomenon

Raynaud’s Disease: Why Your Hands and Feet Hurt So Badly When They’re Cold

from SELF

Winter is terrible for many reasons, seasonal affective disorder, treacherous slicks of ice, and the infinite quest for moisturized skin among them. But for people with Raynaud’s disease (sometimes called Raynaud’s phenomenon or syndrome), winter can also make their hands and feet go numb, then ache, and even turn every color of the American flag in the process. It would be an impressive party trick if it weren’t so painful.

Raynaud’s symptoms are painfully distinct.

It’s not just that your fingers feel cold when you trudge through the snow (or frolic, depending on your opinion of winter). “It’s impressive, this change,” vascular surgeon Daiva Nevidomskyte, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Surgery at Duke University School of Medicine, tells SELF. “Within a couple of minutes, people’s fingers turn pale, then blue, and once they’re reheated, they turn red. It’s a pretty dramatic response.”

Beyond the visible changes, when someone is having a Raynaud’s attack, the lack of blood flow will lead to numbness and pain in the affected body part as it turns white and blue. When the blood flow returns, the body part starts to redden, and nerves reacting to the renewed circulation will cause tingling, throbbing, or burning, Mounir Haurani, M.D., vascular surgeon and assistant professor at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, tells SELF.

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Hand Ski and Snowboard Injury Thumb

Random Fact: Skiing Injuries

Did you know? Looping your hands through the straps of a ski pole increases your risk of hurting your thumb if you fall. Upper extremity injuries are some of the most common skiing injuries. Learn more about how to ski safely at www.HandCare.org.

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Dupuytren's Contracture Finger Hand

Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist on Dupuytren’s Contracture

Dupuytren's ContractureDupuytren's ContractureDupuytren's Contracture

Why can’t I straighten my finger?

Dupuytren’s Contracture is a benign disorder of the hand that may result in tightening of the palm and bending of the fingers. When it begins, the palm or finger(s) appear to have bumps and later may develop a rope-y appearance.  It is not usually painful, but in some cases, discomfort is reported. The condition is most common in men (almost 5 to 1 versus women) of Northwestern European descent and onset increases with age (over 40).

The condition usually starts with the first knuckle. If it progresses, the middle knuckle may also bend. The fingers most affected are the ring and small, with possible progression to the long, index and thumb. Early signs of Dupuytren’s Contracture may include the appearance of “pitting/dimpling” in the palm. It may become difficult to place the hand on a flat surface, put on gloves, or put the hand in a pocket.

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Brachial Plexus Hand Nerves Shoulder

What is a Brachial Plexus Injury?

The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that start in the spinal cord in the neck and travel down the arm. These nerves control the muscles of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, as well as provide feeling in the arm. If you have a brachial plexus injury, it means you have damaged a nerve.

Nerve injuries can be very serious, as they can stop signals to and from the brain. Nerves can be damaged by stretching, pressure or cutting. Stretching can occur when the head and neck are forced away from the shoulder, such as during a motorcycle or car accident. Pressure could occur if the brachial plexus is crushed, which can happen during a fracture or dislocation. You will know if you have a nerve injury, as opposed to just a broken bone or other injury, if you’ve lost feeling in your arm.

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Hand Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery Wide Awake Surgery

Video: Wide Awake Surgery


During wide awake surgery, rather than being put asleep, you are only numbed in the area of the body on which surgery is being performed. You will be awake during the procedure. But, don’t worry, you won’t be able to see the procedure being performed. There will be a blue sheet blocking your view. For example, if you are having a hand surgery, only your hand/arm will be numbed. This procedure is fully sterile as a normal surgery is.

Watch our short, 3-minute video above to hear from a surgeon and patient about wide awake surgery. Or, keep reading to learn about the benefits of wide awake surgery.

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Hand Hand Tumor Lumps and Bumps

3 Common Types of Hand Tumors

While any lump or bump you find on your hand or wrist can be considered a “tumor,” it does not mean that the tumor is cancerous. There are many different types of hand tumors, and most are benign, which means non-cancerous. Hand tumors can be something as common as a wart or a mole, which are on top of the skin, or something more uncommon that is beneath the skin. Here are some examples of common hand tumors:

Ganglion Cyst1. Ganglion Cysts
These are some of the most common tumors in the hand, and the cause is unknown. Ganglion cysts are seen frequently in the wrist but can also appear at the base of your fingers or around the finger joints. The bump is typically filled with fluid, and it will feel very firm.  It may or may not be painful. This type of tumor is not cancerous. If the bump is not painful and is not affecting your daily life, your surgeon may recommend to leave it alone. Other treatment options may include aspiration (puncturing with a needle) or surgically removing it.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Hand Hand Surgery

9 Things You Need to Know About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

from SELF

Think of carpal tunnel syndrome as pins and needles on steroids. This health condition can cause persistent numbness, tingling, and burning in your fingers, wrists, and even your arms. Luckily, carpal tunnel treatment is precise enough that it has the potential to completely resolve the problem that fuels this syndrome in the first place. So here’s everything you need to know about carpal tunnel syndrome, including how to treat it if you’re experiencing symptoms.

1. Carpal tunnel syndrome all comes down to a single nerve.

The median nerve, which runs from your forearm into your thumb, index, and middle fingers, along with part of your ring finger, is nestled inside a canal known as the carpal tunnel. “When the median nerve doesn’t get enough blood flow, it makes your hand hurt and feel like it’s tingling and numb,” Leon S. Benson, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon with the Illinois Bone and Joint Institutewho specializes in elbow, hand, and shoulder issues, tells SELF.

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